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1 - 10 of 14 results for: APPPHYS ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

APPPHYS 188: Matter and Mattering: Transdisciplinary Thinking about Things (ANTHRO 188, ANTHRO 288, ARCHLGY 188, ARTSINST 198, ARTSINST 298)

Things sit at the nexus of cross-cutting heterogeneous processes; tracing the entanglements of any prominent thing or class of things demands a transdisciplinary approach that recruits expertise from the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. For example, carbon is a key factor in global warming for reasons that are as much socio-historical as bio-physical, and we could not begin to sketch the full significance of carbon without considering such diverse frames of reference. Our growing appreciation in the social sciences and humanities of the agency, polyvalence and catalytic role of things has given rise to The New Materialist and Post-Humanist movements, which in turn raise questions about intra-action and observational perspective that are echoed in the modern physical and life sciences. In this class we will explore these theoretical convergences in considering themes such as `things-in-themselves¿, networks and open systems, assemblages and entanglements. We will also e more »
Things sit at the nexus of cross-cutting heterogeneous processes; tracing the entanglements of any prominent thing or class of things demands a transdisciplinary approach that recruits expertise from the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. For example, carbon is a key factor in global warming for reasons that are as much socio-historical as bio-physical, and we could not begin to sketch the full significance of carbon without considering such diverse frames of reference. Our growing appreciation in the social sciences and humanities of the agency, polyvalence and catalytic role of things has given rise to The New Materialist and Post-Humanist movements, which in turn raise questions about intra-action and observational perspective that are echoed in the modern physical and life sciences. In this class we will explore these theoretical convergences in considering themes such as `things-in-themselves¿, networks and open systems, assemblages and entanglements. We will also examine specific examples such as oil, metal (guns), dams, viruses, electricity, mushrooms; each thing will be explored both in terms of its social and ethical entanglements and in terms of its material properties and affordances. There will also be hands-on encounters with objects in labs and a couple of local field trips. The key question throughout will be `why and how does matter matter in society today?¿
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

APPPHYS 204: Quantum Materials

Applied Physics Core course appropriate for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students with prior knowledge of elementary quantum mechanics. Introduction to materials and topics of current interest. Topics include superconductivity, magnetism, charge and spin density waves, frustration, classical and quantum phase transitions, multiferroics, and interfaces. Prerequisite: elementary course in quantum mechanics.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

APPPHYS 205: Introduction to Biophysics (BIO 126, BIO 226)

Core course appropriate for advanced undergraduate students and graduate students with prior knowledge of calculus and a college physics course. Introduction to how physical principles offer insights into modern biology, with regard to the structural, dynamical, and functional organization of biological systems. Topics include the roles of free energy, diffusion, electromotive forces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and information in fundamental biological processes.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

APPPHYS 207: Laboratory Electronics

Lecture/lab emphasizing analog and digital electronics for lab research. RC and diode circuits. Transistors. Feedback and operational amplifiers. Active filters and circuits. Pulsed circuits, voltage regulators, and power circuits. Precision circuits, low-noise measurement, and noise reduction techniques. Circuit simulation tools. Analog signal processing techniques and modulation/demodulation. Principles of synchronous detection and applications of lock-in amplifiers. Common laboratory measurements and techniques illustrated via topical applications. Prerequisites: undergraduate device and circuit exposure.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Fox, J. (PI)

APPPHYS 228: Quantum Hardware

Review of the basics of quantum information. Quantum optics: photon counting, detection, and amplification. Quantum noise in parametric processes. Quantum sensing: standard quantum limits, squeezed light, and spin squeezing. Gaussian quantum information. Quantum theory of electric circuits, electromagnetic components, and nanomechanical devices. Integrated quantum systems: superconductivity and Josephson qubits, measurement-based quantum computing with photons, spin qubits, topological systems. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 134/234 and APPPHYS 203.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

APPPHYS 280: Phenomenology of Superconductors

Phenomenology of superconductivity viewed as a macroscopic quantum phenomenon. Topics include the superconducting pair wave function, London and Ginzburg-Landau theories, the Josephson effect, type I type II superconductivity, and the response of superconductors to currents, magnetic fields, and RF electromagnetic radiation. Introduction to thermal fluctuation effects in superconductors and quantum superconductivity.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

APPPHYS 282: Introduction to Modern Atomic Physics and Quantum Optics (PHYSICS 182, PHYSICS 282)

Introduction to modern atomic physics, including laser cooling and trapping, collisions, ultracold and quantum gases, optical lattices, entanglement, and ion trap quantum gates. Introduction to quantum optical theory of light and atom-photon interactions, including cavity QED, quantum trajectory theory, nonlinear optics, and fundamentals of laser spectroscopy including frequency combs. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 131 or 134.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lev, B. (PI)

APPPHYS 290: Directed Studies in Applied Physics

Special studies under the direction of a faculty member for which academic credit may properly be allowed. May include lab work or directed reading.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

APPPHYS 384: Advanced Topics in AMO Physics

This course will develop the subject of Strong-Field QED. Topics to be covered include: The structure of the quantum vacuum;relativistic laser-vacuum interactions;linear and non-linear Compton and Breit-Wheeler pair-production processes;vacuum polarization and vacuum tunneling; the radiation reaction problem in strong fields;applications in astrophysics and cosmology. The course will also cover experimental methods, including petawatt lasers with focused intensities sufficient to destabilize the vacuum. Prerequisites: familiarity with quantum mechanics, electrodynamics, and special relativity.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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