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1 - 10 of 54 results for: ANTHRO ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ANTHRO 1: Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 201)

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline's distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 30N: Does Science Have Culture?

In this course students will engage with the anthropology of science and medicine to explore the how cultural norms shape scientific understandings. Through a series of diverse global case studies, seminar participants will assess how historical conditions yield political possibilities that inflect discoveries. Lastly, students will probe how cultural understandings of nature, human difference and national esteem influence how scientific facts come to cohere as reflections of the societies in which they emerge.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 82P: The Literature of Psychosis (HUMBIO 162L, PSYC 82, PSYC 282)

One of the great gifts of literature is its ability to give us insight into the internal worlds of others. This is particularly true of that state clinicians call "psychosis." But psychosis is a complex concept. It can be terrifying and devastating for patients and families, and yet shares characteristics with other, less pathological states, such as mysticism and creativity. How then can we begin to make sense of it? In this course, we will examine the first-hand experience of psychosis. We will approach it from multiple perspectives, including clinical descriptions, works of art, and texts by writers ranging from Shakespeare, to the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick, to patients attempting to describe their experience. This class is not only for students thinking of careers in medicine, psychology or anthropology, but also readers and writers interested exploring extraordinary texts. There are no prerequisites necessary; all that is needed is a love of language and a curiosity about the secrets of other minds.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Mason, D. (PI)

ANTHRO 93: Prefield Research Seminar

For Anthropology majors only; non-majors register for 93B. Preparation for anthropological field research in other societies and the U.S. Data collection techniques include participant observation, interviewing, surveys, sampling procedures, life histories, ethnohistory, and the use of documentary materials. Strategies of successful entry into the community, research ethics, interpersonal dynamics, and the reflexive aspects of fieldwork. Prerequisites: two ANTHRO courses or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Kohrman, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 95: Research in Anthropology

Independent research conducted under faculty supervision, normally taken junior or senior year in pursuit of a senior paper or an honors project. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 10 units total)

ANTHRO 95B: Independent Study for Honors or Senior Paper Writing

Required of Anthropology honors or senior paper candidates. Taken in the final quarter before handing in the final draft of the Honors or Senior Paper and graduating. This independent study supports work on the honors and senior papers for students with an approved honors or senior paper application in Anthropology. Prerequisite: consent of Anthropology faculty advisor.nnTerms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum Units: 1-5nn(not repeatable for credit)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5

ANTHRO 95C: Monumental Pasts: Cultural Heritage and Politics (ARCHLGY 95)

What is heritage? Who decides what and how pasts matter? Our pasts loom monumental in multiple senses. At the intersection of archaeology and anthropology, the emerging discipline of heritage is often described as the politics of the past. What people choose to take from their histories varies and is often contested. Heritage shapes and is shaped by power. This course introduces contemporary themes and debates in cultural heritage. Together we'll develop a critical stance toward dominant perspectives to understand how pasts are used, erased, reclaimed, and mobilized in the present, for the future. In doing so we'll think through concepts such as materiality, intangibility, monumentality, value, memory, identity, community, nationalism, and universality. Our case studies will range from contemporary debates over Jim Crow era monuments in the USA, to UNESCO World Heritage List politics, and the development of community identities. We will also reflect on heritage at a personal scale and its relationship to belonging. Course materials will include readings and media from around the globe. Students will participate through seminar discussions, proposing and presenting topics of their choice, regular journal entries, and a choice of final project¿podcast, paper, or exhibition plan.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

ANTHRO 96: Directed Individual Study

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 97: Internship in Anthropology

Opportunity for students to pursue their specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, or government agency. May be repeated for credit. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 122A: Decolonizing Archaeology (ANTHRO 222A)

What does it mean to say that archaeology is a colonial discipline? Anthropology and archaeology are rooted historically in projects of domination and extermination by colonial powers. Today many scholars, practitioners, and colonized peoples are exploring ways to recast the archaeological project--to de-colonize it. There are many approaches to such attempts and this course will explore three of them: Indigenous archaeology, community-based participatory research, and activist archaeology. There are no recipes to produce de-colonized archaeology and no clear answers to the questions that arise in the process. As a class we will explore possibilities and chart futures for a practice of archaeology that breaks from divides between researcher and subject, past and present, and scholarship and social justice. From this course you will gain an understanding of foundational critiques of archaeology from inside and outside the discipline and from Indigenous, Black, and people of color who have historically been the subject of archaeology¿s colonial practices. You will also gain an understanding of attempts to move beyond colonial frameworks and your own position within them through a series of archaeological case studies. You will not leave this course with answers, but you will leave this course with a deeper understanding of the ongoing project of decolonization.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
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