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1 - 10 of 27 results for: AFRICAAM ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

AFRICAAM 18B: Jazz History: Bebop to Present, 1940-Present (MUSIC 18B)

Modern jazz styles from Bebop to the current scene. Emphasis is on the significant artists of each style.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II

AFRICAAM 39: Long Live Our 4Bil. Year Old Mother: Black Feminist Praxis, Indigenous Resistance, Queer Possibility (CSRE 39, FEMGEN 39, NATIVEAM 39)

How can art facilitate a culture that values women, mothers, transfolks, caregivers, girls? How can black, indigenous, and people of color frameworks help us reckon with oppressive systems that threaten safety and survival for marginalized people and the lands that sustain us? How can these questions reveal the brilliant and inventive forms of survival that precede and transcend harmful systems toward a world of possibility? Each week, this course will call on artists, scholars, and organizers of color who clarify the urgency and interconnection of issues from patriarchal violence to environmental degradation; criminalization to legacies of settler colonialism. These same thinkers will also speak to the imaginative, everyday knowledge and creative healing practices that our forebears have used for millennia to give vision and rise to true transformation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 43: Introduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature (AMSTUD 12A, ENGLISH 12A)

(Formerly English 43/143). In his bold study, What Was African American Literature?, Kenneth Warren defines African American literature as a late nineteenth- to mid-twentieth-century response to the nation's Jim Crow segregated order. But in the aftermath of the Jim Crow era and the Civil Rights movement, can critics still speak, coherently, of "African American literature"? And how does this political conception of African American literary production compare with accounts grounded in black language and culture? Taking up Warren's intervention, this course will explore African American literature from its earliest manifestations in the spirituals and slave narratives to texts composed at the height of desegregation and decolonization struggles at mid-century and beyond.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Rasberry, V. (PI)

AFRICAAM 44: Post-Civil Right Black America

This course will examine sites of cultural production and resistance of Black America in the post-civil rights era in the United States. It will introduce students to the rhetorical problems, constraints, and possibilities of contemporary Black America through analysis of historical and social trends. We will take a cultural studies approach to texts that emerged from Black struggles and contributions to American society. Though there will be attention given to roots of Black America before emancipation, our primary concern will be with 20th and 21st century African American life and culture. nnTo do this, we will draw from a broad range of scholarship and theory including African American history, studies in race and gender, performance theory, and visual and media studies. The texts we will read and screen are there to assist us in understanding how race and sex are produced and position Blacks within systems of inequality.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-5

AFRICAAM 45: Dance Improvisation from Freestyle to Hip Hop (DANCE 45)

This class is an arena for physical and artistic exploration to fire the imagination of dance improvisers, cultivate sensation and perception within and without studio practice and to promote interactive intelligence.nStudents will learn to harness and transform habitual movement patterns and dance trainings as resources for new ways of moving: expand their awareness of being a part of a bigger picture, while being attentive to everything all at once: and to use visual, aural and kinesthetic responses to convert those impulses into artistic material. Class will be accompanied by live and recorded music and include weekly jam sessions. Open to students from all dance, movement, athletic backgrounds and skill levels. Beginners welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 50C: The United States in the Twentieth Century (HISTORY 50C)

(Same as HISTORY 150C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150C.) 100 years ago, women and most African-Americans couldn't vote; automobiles were rare and computers didn't exist; and the U.S. was a minor power in a world dominated by European empires. This course surveys politics, culture, and social movements to answer the question: How did we get from there to here? Two historical research "labs" or archival sessions focus on the Great Depression in the 1930s and radical and conservative students movements of the 1960s. Suitable for non-majors and majors alike.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

AFRICAAM 55F: The Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1830 to 1877 (AMSTUD 55F, AMSTUD 155F, HISTORY 55F, HISTORY 155F)

( History 55F is 3 units; History 155F is 5 units.)This course explores the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War. The Civil War profoundly impacted American life at national, sectional, and constitutional levels, and radically challenged categories of race and citizenship. Topics covered include: the crisis of union and disunion in an expanding republic; slavery, race, and emancipation as national problems and personal experiences; the horrors of total war for individuals and society; and the challenges--social and political--of Reconstruction.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

AFRICAAM 92BP: Contemporary Black Poetry and Poetics (ENGLISH 92BP)

In this poetry workshop, students will write and read closely, exploring various aspects of poetic craft, including imagery, metaphor and simile, line, stanza, music, rhythm, diction, and tone. The course reading will focus on the rich diversity of contemporary poetry from the global Black diaspora, with a special emphasis on poetry that investigates the intersections of race, cultural identity, nationhood, gender, and sexuality. Note: No prior knowledge of Black poetry and poetics is required. First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Shanahan, C. (PI)

AFRICAAM 106I: Stanford Dance Community: Inter-Style Choreography Workshop (DANCE 106I)

Designed for adventurous dancers, choreographers and student dance team leaders across Stanford campus. Students will explore a multiplicity of dance styles presented both by peer choreographers, as well as professionals in the field, to create a community of dancers who want to experiment and innovate within their form. The emphasis of the class is on individual growth as a dancer and dance maker through exposure to new and unfamiliar styles. Student dance team leaders and dancers with a strong interest in both choreography and learning different forms are highly encouraged to attend. Interested participants encouraged but not required to contact instructor, Aleta Hayes: ahayes1@stanford.edu. Course will consist of weekly choreography master classes taught by peers, composition intensives facilitated by the instructor, and guest professional master classes, not represented by the class participants.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: way_ce
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 128: Roots Modern Experience - Mixed Level (DANCE 128)

In this course students will be introduced to a series of Afro-contemporary dance warm ups and dance combinations that are drawn from a broad range of modern dance techniques, somatic practices and dance traditions of the African diaspora with a particular focus on Afro Brazilian, Afro Cuban and Haitian dance forms. Our study of these dance disciplines will inform the movement vocabulary, technical training, class discussions, and choreography we experience in this course. Students will learn more about the dances and rhythms for the Orishas of Brazil and Cuba, and the Loa of Haiti with an additional focus on other African diaspora dance forms such as, Cuban Haitian, Palo, Samba and Samba-Reggae. Dance combinations will consist of dynamic movement patterns that condition the body for strength, flexibility, endurance, musicality and coordination. Through this approach to our warm ups and class choreography, we will deepen our analysis and understanding of how African diaspora movement traditions are inherently embedded in many expressions of the broadly termed form known as contemporary dance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: way_ce
Instructors: Smith, A. (PI)
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