2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 26 results for: AA ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

AA 100: Introduction to Aeronautics and Astronautics

This class introduces the basics of aeronautics and astronautics through applied physics, hands-on activities, and real world examples. The principles of fluid flow, flight, and propulsion for aircraft will be illustrated, including the creation of lift and drag, aerodynamic performance including takeoff, climb, range, and landing. The principles of orbits, maneuvers, space environment, and propulsion for spacecraft will be illustrated. Students will be exposed to the history and challenges of aeronautics and astronautics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Hara, K. (PI)

AA 115Q: The Global Positioning System: Where on Earth are We, and What Time is It?

Preference to freshmen. Why people want to know where they are: answers include cross-Pacific trips of Polynesians, missile guidance, and distraught callers. How people determine where they are: navigation technology from dead-reckoning, sextants, and satellite navigation (GPS). Hands-on experience. How GPS works; when it does not work; possibilities for improving performance.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR
Instructors: Lo, S. (PI)

AA 136B: Spacecraft Design Laboratory (AA 236B)

Space Capstone II. Required for Aero/Astro majors. Continuation of 236A. Emphasis is on practical application of systems engineering to the life cycle program of spacecraft design, testing, launching, and operations. Prerequisite: 236A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

AA 146A: Aircraft Design

Air Capstone I. Required for Aero/Astro majors. This capstone design class brings together the material from prior classes in a way that emphasizes the interactions between disciplines and demonstrates how some of the more theoretical topics are synthesized in practical design of an aircraft concept. The class will address a single problem developed by the faculty and staff. Students will spend two quarters designing a system that addresses the objectives and requirements posed at the beginning of the course sequence. They will work individually and in teams, focusing on some aspect of the problem but exposed to many different disciplines and challenges. The second quarter will focus on the demonstration of a physical system incorporating features of the design solution. This may be accomplished with a set of experiments or a flight demonstration involving data gathering and synthesis of work in a final report authored by the team.nnnPrerequisites:nn1. Math 20, 21 or 41, 42 or equivalentsnn2. Elementary physics, and AA100 or equivalent classesnn3. Additional required AA courses dealing with aero, structures, and controls
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Kroo, I. (PI)

AA 174B: Principles of Robot Autonomy II (AA 274B, CS 237B, EE 260B)

This course teaches advanced principles for endowing mobile autonomous robots with capabilities to autonomously learn new skills and to physically interact with the environment and with humans. It also provides an overview of different robot system architectures. Concepts that will be covered in the course are: Reinforcement Learning and its relationship to optimal control, contact and dynamics models for prehensile and non-prehensile robot manipulation, imitation learning and human intent inference, as well as different system architectures and their verification. Students will earn the theoretical foundations for these concepts and implementnthem on mobile manipulation platforms. In homeworks, the Robot Operating System (ROS) will be used extensively for demonstrations and hands-on activities. Prerequisites: CS106A or equivalent, CME 100 or equivalent (for linear algebra), CME 106 or equivalent (for probability theory), and AA 171/274.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

AA 190: Directed Research and Writing in Aero/Astro

For undergraduates. Experimental or theoretical work under faculty direction, and emphasizing development of research and communication skills. Written report(s) and letter grade required; if this is not appropriate, enroll in 199. Consult faculty in area of interest for appropriate topics, involving one of the graduate research groups or other special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of student services manager and instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit

AA 199: Independent Study in Aero/Astro

Directed reading, lab, or theoretical work for undergraduate students. Consult faculty in area of interest for appropriate topics involving one of the graduate research groups or other special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

AA 214: Numerical Methods for Compressible Flows

For M.S.-level graduate students. Covers the hierarchy of mathematical models for compressible flows. Introduction to finite difference, finite volume, and finite element methods for their computation. Ideal potential flow; transonic potential flow; Euler equations; Navier-Stokes equations; representative model problems; shocks, expansions, and contact discontinuities; treatment of boundary conditions; time and pseudo-time integration schemes. Prerequisites: basic knowledge of linear algebra and ODEs ( CME 206 or equivalent).
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Farhat, C. (PI)

AA 229: Advanced Topics in Sequential Decision Making (CS 239)

Survey of recent research advances in intelligent decision making for dynamic environments from a computational perspective. Efficient algorithms for single and multiagent planning in situations where a model of the environment may or may not be known. Partially observable Markov decision processes, approximate dynamic programming, and reinforcement learning. New approaches for overcoming challenges in generalization from experience, exploration of the environment, and model representation so that these methods can scale to real problems in a variety of domains including aerospace, air traffic control, and robotics. Students are expected to produce an original research paper on a relevant topic. Prerequisites: AA 228/ CS 238 or CS 221.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints