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1 - 10 of 30 results for: tissue engineering

BIOE 103: Systems Physiology and Design

Physiology of intact human tissues, organs, and organ systems in health and disease, and bioengineering tools used (or needed) to probe and model these physiological systems. Topics: Clinical physiology, network physiology and system design/plasticity, diseases and interventions (major syndromes, simulation, and treatment, instrumentation for intervention, stimulation, diagnosis, and prevention), and new technologies including tissue engineering and optogenetics.  Discussions of pathology of these systems in a clinical-case based format, with a view towards identifying unmet clinical needs.  Learning computational skills that not only enable simulation of these systems but also apply more broadly to biomedical data analysis. Prerequisites: CME 102; PHYSICS 41; BIO 41, 42
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 103B: Systems Physiology and Design

*ONLINE Offering of BIOE103. This pilot class, BIOE103B, is an entirely online offering with the same content, learning goals, and prerequisites as BIOE103. Students attend class by watching videos and completing assignments remotely. Students may attend recitation and office hours in person, but cannot attend the BIOE103 in-person lecture due to room capacity restraints.* Physiology of intact human tissues, organs, and organ systems in health and disease, and bioengineering tools used (or needed) to probe and model these physiological systems. Topics: Clinical physiology, network physiology and system design/plasticity, diseases and interventions (major syndromes, simulation, and treatment, instrumentation for intervention, stimulation, diagnosis, and prevention), and new technologies including tissue engineering and optogenetics. Discussions of pathology of these systems in a clinical-case based format, with a view towards identifying unmet clinical needs. Learning computational skills that not only enable simulation of these systems but also apply more broadly to biomedical data analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 41, 42; CME 102; PHY 41; BIO 41, 42; strongly recommended PHY 43; or instructor approval.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 211: Biophysics of Multi-cellular Systems and Amorphous Computing (BIOE 311, BIOPHYS 311, DBIO 211)

Provides an interdisciplinary perspective on the design, emergent behavior, and functionality of multi-cellular biological systems such as embryos, biofilms, and artificial tissues and their conceptual relationship to amorphous computers. Students discuss relevant literature and introduced to and apply pertinent mathematical and biophysical modeling approaches to various aspect multi-cellular systems, furthermore carry out real biology experiments over the web. Specific topics include: (Morphogen) gradients; reaction-diffusion systems (Turing patterns); visco-elastic aspects and forces in tissues; morphogenesis; coordinated gene expression, genetic oscillators and synchrony; genetic networks; self-organization, noise, robustness, and evolvability; game theory; emergent behavior; criticality; symmetries; scaling; fractals; agent based modeling. The course is geared towards a broadly interested graduate and advanced undergraduates audience such as from bio / applied physics, computer science, developmental and systems biology, and bio / tissue / mechanical / electrical engineering. Prerequisites: Previous knowledge in one programming language - ideally Matlab - is recommended; undergraduate students benefit from BIOE 41, BIOE 42, or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOE 260: Tissue Engineering (ORTHO 260)

Principles of tissue engineering and design strategies for practical applications for tissue repair. Topics include tissue morphogenesis, stem cells, biomaterials, controlled drug and gene delivery, and paper discussions. Students will learn skills for lab research through interactive lectures, paper discussions and research proposal development. Students work in small teams to work on develop research proposal for authentic tissue engineering problems. Lab sessions will teach techniques for culturing cells in 3D, as well as fabricating and characterizing hydrogels as 3D cell niche.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 300B: Engineering Concepts Applied to Physiology

This course focuses on engineering approaches to quantifying, modeling and controlling the physiology and pathophysiology of complex systems, from the level of individual cells to tissue, organ and multi-organ systems.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 311: Biophysics of Multi-cellular Systems and Amorphous Computing (BIOE 211, BIOPHYS 311, DBIO 211)

Provides an interdisciplinary perspective on the design, emergent behavior, and functionality of multi-cellular biological systems such as embryos, biofilms, and artificial tissues and their conceptual relationship to amorphous computers. Students discuss relevant literature and introduced to and apply pertinent mathematical and biophysical modeling approaches to various aspect multi-cellular systems, furthermore carry out real biology experiments over the web. Specific topics include: (Morphogen) gradients; reaction-diffusion systems (Turing patterns); visco-elastic aspects and forces in tissues; morphogenesis; coordinated gene expression, genetic oscillators and synchrony; genetic networks; self-organization, noise, robustness, and evolvability; game theory; emergent behavior; criticality; symmetries; scaling; fractals; agent based modeling. The course is geared towards a broadly interested graduate and advanced undergraduates audience such as from bio / applied physics, computer science, developmental and systems biology, and bio / tissue / mechanical / electrical engineering. Prerequisites: Previous knowledge in one programming language - ideally Matlab - is recommended; undergraduate students benefit from BIOE 41, BIOE 42, or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOE 361: Biomaterials in Regenerative Medicine (MATSCI 381)

Materials design and engineering for regenerative medicine. How materials interact with cells through their micro- and nanostructure, mechanical properties, degradation characteristics, surface chemistry, and biochemistry. Examples include novel materials for drug and gene delivery, materials for stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Prerequisites: undergraduate chemistry, and cell/molecular biology or biochemistry.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 393: Bioengineering Departmental Research Colloquium

Bioengineering department labs at Stanford present recent research projects and results. Guest lecturers. Topics include applications of engineering to biology, medicine, biotechnology, and medical technology, including biodesign and devices, molecular and cellular engineering, regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, biomedical imaging, and biomedical computation. Aut, Win, Spr (Lin, Riedel-Kruse, Barron)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOPHYS 311: Biophysics of Multi-cellular Systems and Amorphous Computing (BIOE 211, BIOE 311, DBIO 211)

Provides an interdisciplinary perspective on the design, emergent behavior, and functionality of multi-cellular biological systems such as embryos, biofilms, and artificial tissues and their conceptual relationship to amorphous computers. Students discuss relevant literature and introduced to and apply pertinent mathematical and biophysical modeling approaches to various aspect multi-cellular systems, furthermore carry out real biology experiments over the web. Specific topics include: (Morphogen) gradients; reaction-diffusion systems (Turing patterns); visco-elastic aspects and forces in tissues; morphogenesis; coordinated gene expression, genetic oscillators and synchrony; genetic networks; self-organization, noise, robustness, and evolvability; game theory; emergent behavior; criticality; symmetries; scaling; fractals; agent based modeling. The course is geared towards a broadly interested graduate and advanced undergraduates audience such as from bio / applied physics, computer science, developmental and systems biology, and bio / tissue / mechanical / electrical engineering. Prerequisites: Previous knowledge in one programming language - ideally Matlab - is recommended; undergraduate students benefit from BIOE 41, BIOE 42, or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CHEMENG 420: Growth and Form

Advanced topics course examining the role of physical forces in shaping living cells, tissues, and organs, making use of D'Arcy Thompson's classic text On Growth and Form. The course begins with a review of relevant physical principles drawn from statistical physics, polymer theory, rheology and materials science. We then examine current knowledge of cellular mechanotransduction pathways, the roles of physical forces in guiding embryonic development, and the contribution of aberrant cellular response to mechanical cues in heart disease and cancer. The course concludes by examining current frontiers in stem cell biology and tissue engineering.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dunn, A. (PI)
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