2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 25 results for: tissue engineering

BIOE 80: Introduction to Bioengineering (ENGR 80)

Broad but rigorous overview of the field of bioengineering, centered around the common theme of engineering analysis and design of biological systems. Topics include biomechanics, systems and synthetic biology, physical biology, biomolecular engineering, tissue engineering, and devices. Emphasis on critical thinking and problem solving approaches, and quantitative methods applied to biology. 4 units, Spr (Cochran)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 103: Systems Physiology and Design

Physiological design principles of intact tissues, organs, organ systems, and organisms in health and disease, and bioengineering tools used (or needed) to probe and model these physiological systems. Topics: Clinical physiology, ion channels and gradients, nonlinear dynamics of cell physiology, network physiology and system design/plasticity, diseases and interventions (major syndromes, simulation and treatment planning, instrumentation for intervention and stimulation, instrumentation for diagnosis and prevention), and new technologies including tissue engineering and optogenetics. Analytic and conceptual problem solving with cases from primary literature and real-world applications. Prerequisites: MATH 41, 42; CME 102; PHY 41, 43; BIO 41, 42; or instructor approval.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 300B: Physiology and Tissue Engineering

This course focuses on engineering approaches to quantifying, modeling and controlling the physiology and pathophysiology of complex systems, from the level of individual cells to tissue, organ and multi-organ systems. (Covert)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOE 260: Tissue Engineering (ORTHO 260)

Principles of tissue engineering and design strategies for practical applications for tissue repair. Topics include tissue components and dynamics, morphogenesis, stem cells, cellular fate processes, cell and tissue characterization, controlled drug and gene delivery, bioreactors, cell-materials interactions, and host integration. Present research proposal to solve a real life tissue engineering problem.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOE 361: Biomaterials in Regenerative Medicine (MATSCI 381)

Materials design and engineering for regenerative medicine. How materials interact with cells through their micro- and nanostructure, mechanical properties, degradation characteristics, surface chemistry, and biochemistry. Examples include novel materials for drug and gene delivery, materials for stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Prerequisites: undergraduate chemistry, and cell/molecular biology or biochemistry.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 393: Bioengineering Departmental Research Colloquium

Bioengineering department labs at Stanford present recent research projects and results. Guest lecturers. Topics include applications of engineering to biology, medicine, biotechnology, and medical technology, including biodesign and devices, molecular and cellular engineering, regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, biomedical imaging, and biomedical computation. Aut, Win, Spr (Lin, Riedel-Kruse, Barron)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEMENG 420: Growth and Form

Advanced topics course examining the role of physical forces in shaping living cells, tissues, and organs, making use of D'Arcy Thompson's classic text On Growth and Form. The course begins with a review of relevant physical principles drawn from statistical physics, polymer theory, rheology and materials science. We then examine current knowledge of cellular mechanotransduction pathways, the roles of physical forces in guiding embryonic development, and the contribution of aberrant cellular response to mechanical cues in heart disease and cancer. The course concludes by examining current frontiers in stem cell biology and tissue engineering.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 331: Biophotonics: Light in Medicine and Biology

Current topics and trends in the use of light in medicine and for advanced microscopy. Course begins with a review of relevant optical principles (basic physics required). Key topics include: light-tissue interactions; sensing and spectroscopy; contrast-enhanced imaging; super-resolution and label-free microscopy; medical applications of light for diagnostics, in-vivo imaging, and therapy; nanophotonics and array technologies. Open to non-majors; programming experience (Matlab and/or C) required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Bowden, A. (PI)

EE 303: Autonomous Implantable Systems

Integrating electronics with sensing, stimulation, and locomotion capabilities into the body will allow us to restore or enhance physiological functions. In order to be able to insert these electronics into the body, energy source is a major obstacle. This course focuses on the analysis and design of wirelessly powered catheter-deliverable electronics. Emphases will be on the interaction between human and electromagnetic fields in order to transfer power to the embedded electronics via electromagnetic fields, power harvesting circuitry, electrical-tissue interface, and sensing and actuating frontend designs. Prerequisites: EE 252 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Poon, A. (PI)

ENGR 80: Introduction to Bioengineering (BIOE 80)

Broad but rigorous overview of the field of bioengineering, centered around the common theme of engineering analysis and design of biological systems. Topics include biomechanics, systems and synthetic biology, physical biology, biomolecular engineering, tissue engineering, and devices. Emphasis on critical thinking and problem solving approaches, and quantitative methods applied to biology. 4 units, Spr (Cochran)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints