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11 - 20 of 27 results for: tissue engineering

CHEMENG 470: Mechanics of Soft Matter: Rheology (CHEMENG 270)

Soft matter comes in many forms and includes polymeric materials, suspensions, emulsions, foams, gels, and living tissue. These materials are characterized by being easily deformed and possessing internal relaxation time spectra. They are viscoelastic with responses that are intermediate between purely viscous liquids and perfectly elastic solids. This course provides an introduction to the subject of rheology, which concerns the deformation and flow of complex liquids and solids. Rheological testing is aimed at determining the relationships between the applied stresses in these materials and the resulting deformations. These are characterized by material functions, such as viscosity (shear and extensional), moduli, and compliances. These functions reflect the microstructure of the material being tested and microstructural models of polymers (single chain theories and reptation-based models), suspensions, emulsions, and foams will be presented. Experimental methods to measure materials more »
Soft matter comes in many forms and includes polymeric materials, suspensions, emulsions, foams, gels, and living tissue. These materials are characterized by being easily deformed and possessing internal relaxation time spectra. They are viscoelastic with responses that are intermediate between purely viscous liquids and perfectly elastic solids. This course provides an introduction to the subject of rheology, which concerns the deformation and flow of complex liquids and solids. Rheological testing is aimed at determining the relationships between the applied stresses in these materials and the resulting deformations. These are characterized by material functions, such as viscosity (shear and extensional), moduli, and compliances. These functions reflect the microstructure of the material being tested and microstructural models of polymers (single chain theories and reptation-based models), suspensions, emulsions, and foams will be presented. Experimental methods to measure materials subjected to both shearing and elongational deformations will be described. Many soft matter systems are influenced by interfacial phenomena (foams, emulsions, thin films in the human body) and interfacial rheological techniques will be discussed. Advanced undergraduates register for 270; graduates register for 470. Prerequisites: ChE 120A or its equivalent (concurrent enrollment is permissible)
Terms: Win | Units: 3

DBIO 211: Biophysics of Multi-cellular Systems and Amorphous Computing (BIOE 211, BIOE 311, BIOPHYS 311)

Provides an interdisciplinary perspective on the design, emergent behavior, and functionality of multi-cellular biological systems such as embryos, biofilms, and artificial tissues and their conceptual relationship to amorphous computers. Students discuss relevant literature and introduced to and apply pertinent mathematical and biophysical modeling approaches to various aspect multi-cellular systems, furthermore carry out real biology experiments over the web. Specific topics include: (Morphogen) gradients; reaction-diffusion systems (Turing patterns); visco-elastic aspects and forces in tissues; morphogenesis; coordinated gene expression, genetic oscillators and synchrony; genetic networks; self-organization, noise, robustness, and evolvability; game theory; emergent behavior; criticality; symmetries; scaling; fractals; agent based modeling. The course is geared towards a broadly interested graduate and advanced undergraduates audience such as from bio / applied physics, computer science, developmental and systems biology, and bio / tissue / mechanical / electrical engineering. Prerequisites: Previous knowledge in one programming language - ideally Matlab - is recommended; undergraduate students benefit from BIOE 42, or equivalent.
Last offered: Winter 2018

EE 303: Autonomous Implantable Systems

Integrating electronics with sensing, stimulation, and locomotion capabilities into the body will allow us to restore or enhance physiological functions. In order to be able to insert these electronics into the body, energy source is a major obstacle. This course focuses on the analysis and design of wirelessly powered catheter-deliverable electronics. Emphases will be on the interaction between human and electromagnetic fields in order to transfer power to the embedded electronics via electromagnetic fields, power harvesting circuitry, electrical-tissue interface, and sensing and actuating frontend designs. Prerequisites: EE 252 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

MATSCI 81N: Bioengineering Materials to Heal the Body

Preference to freshmen. Real-world examples of materials developed for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine therapies. How scientists and engineers design new materials for surgeons to use in replacing body parts such as damaged heart or spinal cord tissue. How cells interact with implanted materials. Students identify a clinically important disease or injury that requires a better material, proposed research approaches to the problem, and debate possible engineering solutions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 381: Biomaterials in Regenerative Medicine (BIOE 361)

Materials design and engineering for regenerative medicine. How materials interact with cells through their micro- and nanostructure, mechanical properties, degradation characteristics, surface chemistry, and biochemistry. Examples include novel materials for drug and gene delivery, materials for stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Prerequisites: undergraduate chemistry, and cell/molecular biology or biochemistry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

ME 234: Introduction to Neuromechanics

Understanding the role of mechanics in brain development, physiology, and pathology. Mechanics of brain cells: neurons, mechanobiology, mechanotransduction. Mechanics of brain tissue: experimental testing, constitutive modeling, computational modeling. Mechanics of brain development: gyrification, cortical folding, axon elongation, lissencephaly, polymicrogyria. Mechanics of traumatic brain injury: high impact loading, neural injury. Mechanics of brain tumors, brain cancer, tumor growth, altered cytoskeletal mechanics. Mechanics of neurological disorders: autism, dementia, schizophrenia. Mechanics of brain surgery.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

ME 244: Mechanotransduction in Cells and Tissues (BIOE 283, BIOPHYS 244)

Mechanical cues play a critical role in development, normal functioning of cells and tissues, and various diseases. This course will cover what is known about cellular mechanotransduction, or the processes by which living cells sense and respond to physical cues such as physiological forces or mechanical properties of the tissue microenvironment. Experimental techniques and current areas of active investigation will be highlighted. This class is for graduate students only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

ME 283: Introduction to Biomechanics and Mechanobiology

Introduction to the mechanical analysis of tissues (biomechanics), and how mechanical cues play a role in regulating tissue development, adaptation, regeneration, and aging (mechanobiology). Topics include tissue viscoelasticity, cardiovascular biomechanics, blood rheology, interstitial flow, bone mechanics, muscle contraction and mechanics, and mechanobiology of the musculoskeletal system. Undergraduates should have taken ME70 and ME80, or equivalent courses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

ME 287: Mechanics of Biological Tissues

Introduction to the mechanical behaviors of biological tissues in health and disease. Overview of experimental approaches to evaluating tissue properties and mathematical constitutive models. Elastic behaviors of hard tissues, nonlinear elastic and viscoelastic models for soft tissues.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

ME 387: Soft Tissue Mechanics

Structure/function relationships and mechanical properties of soft tissues, including nonlinear elasticity, viscoelasticity, and poroelasticity.
Last offered: Summer 2018
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