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1 - 10 of 12 results for: mabuchi

ANTHRO 188: Matter and Mattering: Transdisciplinary Thinking about Things (ANTHRO 288, APPPHYS 188, ARCHLGY 188, ARTSINST 198, ARTSINST 298)

Things sit at the nexus of cross-cutting heterogeneous processes; tracing the entanglements of any prominent thing or class of things demands a transdisciplinary approach that recruits expertise from the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. For example, carbon is a key factor in global warming for reasons that are as much socio-historical as bio-physical, and we could not begin to sketch the full significance of carbon without considering such diverse frames of reference. Our growing appreciation in the social sciences and humanities of the agency, polyvalence and catalytic role of things has given rise to The New Materialist and Post-Humanist movements, which in turn raise questions about intra-action and observational perspective that are echoed in the modern physical and life sciences. In this class we will explore these theoretical convergences in considering themes such as `things-in-themselves¿, networks and open systems, assemblages and entanglements. We will also examine specific examples such as oil, metal (guns), dams, viruses, electricity, mushrooms; each thing will be explored both in terms of its social and ethical entanglements and in terms of its material properties and affordances. There will also be hands-on encounters with objects in labs and a couple of local field trips. The key question throughout will be `why and how does matter matter in society today?¿
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5

ANTHRO 288: Matter and Mattering: Transdisciplinary Thinking about Things (ANTHRO 188, APPPHYS 188, ARCHLGY 188, ARTSINST 198, ARTSINST 298)

Things sit at the nexus of cross-cutting heterogeneous processes; tracing the entanglements of any prominent thing or class of things demands a transdisciplinary approach that recruits expertise from the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. For example, carbon is a key factor in global warming for reasons that are as much socio-historical as bio-physical, and we could not begin to sketch the full significance of carbon without considering such diverse frames of reference. Our growing appreciation in the social sciences and humanities of the agency, polyvalence and catalytic role of things has given rise to The New Materialist and Post-Humanist movements, which in turn raise questions about intra-action and observational perspective that are echoed in the modern physical and life sciences. In this class we will explore these theoretical convergences in considering themes such as `things-in-themselves¿, networks and open systems, assemblages and entanglements. We will also examine specific examples such as oil, metal (guns), dams, viruses, electricity, mushrooms; each thing will be explored both in terms of its social and ethical entanglements and in terms of its material properties and affordances. There will also be hands-on encounters with objects in labs and a couple of local field trips. The key question throughout will be `why and how does matter matter in society today?¿
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5

APPPHYS 188: Matter and Mattering: Transdisciplinary Thinking about Things (ANTHRO 188, ANTHRO 288, ARCHLGY 188, ARTSINST 198, ARTSINST 298)

Things sit at the nexus of cross-cutting heterogeneous processes; tracing the entanglements of any prominent thing or class of things demands a transdisciplinary approach that recruits expertise from the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. For example, carbon is a key factor in global warming for reasons that are as much socio-historical as bio-physical, and we could not begin to sketch the full significance of carbon without considering such diverse frames of reference. Our growing appreciation in the social sciences and humanities of the agency, polyvalence and catalytic role of things has given rise to The New Materialist and Post-Humanist movements, which in turn raise questions about intra-action and observational perspective that are echoed in the modern physical and life sciences. In this class we will explore these theoretical convergences in considering themes such as `things-in-themselves¿, networks and open systems, assemblages and entanglements. We will also examine specific examples such as oil, metal (guns), dams, viruses, electricity, mushrooms; each thing will be explored both in terms of its social and ethical entanglements and in terms of its material properties and affordances. There will also be hands-on encounters with objects in labs and a couple of local field trips. The key question throughout will be `why and how does matter matter in society today?¿
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5

APPPHYS 225: Probability and Quantum Mechanics

Structure of quantum theory emphasizing states, measurements, and probabilistic modeling. Generalized quantum measurement theory; parallels between classical and quantum probability; conditional expectation in the Schrödinger and Heisenberg pictures; covariance with respect to symmetry groups; reference frames and super-selection rules. Classical versus quantum correlations; nonlocal aspects of quantum probability; axiomatic approaches to interpretation. Prerequisites: undergraduate quantum mechanics, linear algebra, and basic probability and statistics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Mabuchi, H. (PI)

APPPHYS 290: Directed Studies in Applied Physics

Special studies under the direction of a faculty member for which academic credit may properly be allowed. May include lab work or directed reading.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Baer, T. (PI) ; Beasley, M. (PI) ; Bienenstock, A. (PI) ; Block, S. (PI) ; Brongersma, M. (PI) ; Bucksbaum, P. (PI) ; Byer, R. (PI) ; Chu, S. (PI) ; Clemens, B. (PI) ; Das, R. (PI) ; Devereaux, T. (PI) ; Digonnet, M. (PI) ; Dionne, J. (PI) ; Doniach, S. (PI) ; Druckmann, S. (PI) ; Dunne, M. (PI) ; El Gamal, A. (PI) ; Fan, S. (PI) ; Fejer, M. (PI) ; Feldman, B. (PI) ; Fetter, A. (PI) ; Fisher, D. (PI) ; Fisher, I. (PI) ; Fox, J. (PI) ; Ganguli, S. (PI) ; Geballe, T. (PI) ; Glenzer, S. (PI) ; Goldhaber-Gordon, D. (PI) ; Harris, J. (PI) ; Harrison, W. (PI) ; Heinz, T. (PI) ; Hesselink, L. (PI) ; Hogan, D. (PI) ; Hogan, J. (PI) ; Hollberg, L. (PI) ; Hong, G. (PI) ; Huang, Z. (PI) ; Hwang, H. (PI) ; Kachru, S. (PI) ; Kapitulnik, A. (PI) ; Kasevich, M. (PI) ; Kenny, T. (PI) ; Khuri-Yakub, B. (PI) ; Lee, Y. (PI) ; Lev, B. (PI) ; Levin, C. (PI) ; Lindenberg, A. (PI) ; Lobell, D. (PI) ; Mabuchi, H. (PI) ; Manoharan, H. (PI) ; Miller, D. (PI) ; Moerner, W. (PI) ; Moler, K. (PI) ; Nilsson, A. (PI) ; Osheroff, D. (PI) ; Palanker, D. (PI) ; Pease, R. (PI) ; Petrosian, V. (PI) ; Prakash, M. (PI) ; Quake, S. (PI) ; Quate, C. (PI) ; Raubenheimer, T. (PI) ; Reed, E. (PI) ; Reis, D. (PI) ; Safavi-Naeini, A. (PI) ; Schnitzer, M. (PI) ; Shen, Z. (PI) ; Solgaard, O. (PI) ; Spakowitz, A. (PI) ; Stohr, J. (PI) ; Sturrock, P. (PI) ; Suzuki, Y. (PI) ; Tantawi, S. (PI) ; Vuckovic, J. (PI) ; Winick, H. (PI) ; Yamamoto, Y. (PI) ; Zhang, S. (PI)

APPPHYS 291: Practical Training

Opportunity for practical training in industrial labs. Arranged by student with research adviser's approval. Summary of activities required.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

APPPHYS 390: Dissertation Research

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit

APPPHYS 802: TGR PhD Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit

ARCHLGY 188: Matter and Mattering: Transdisciplinary Thinking about Things (ANTHRO 188, ANTHRO 288, APPPHYS 188, ARTSINST 198, ARTSINST 298)

Things sit at the nexus of cross-cutting heterogeneous processes; tracing the entanglements of any prominent thing or class of things demands a transdisciplinary approach that recruits expertise from the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. For example, carbon is a key factor in global warming for reasons that are as much socio-historical as bio-physical, and we could not begin to sketch the full significance of carbon without considering such diverse frames of reference. Our growing appreciation in the social sciences and humanities of the agency, polyvalence and catalytic role of things has given rise to The New Materialist and Post-Humanist movements, which in turn raise questions about intra-action and observational perspective that are echoed in the modern physical and life sciences. In this class we will explore these theoretical convergences in considering themes such as `things-in-themselves¿, networks and open systems, assemblages and entanglements. We will also examine specific examples such as oil, metal (guns), dams, viruses, electricity, mushrooms; each thing will be explored both in terms of its social and ethical entanglements and in terms of its material properties and affordances. There will also be hands-on encounters with objects in labs and a couple of local field trips. The key question throughout will be `why and how does matter matter in society today?¿
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5

PHYSICS 205: Senior Thesis Research

Long-term experimental or theoretical project and thesis in Physics under supervision of a faculty member. Planning of the thesis project is recommended to begin as early as middle of the junior year. Successful completion of a senior thesis requires a minimum of 3 units for a letter grade completed during the senior year, along with the other formal thesis and physics major requirements. Students doing research for credit prior to senior year should sign up for Physics 190. Prerequisites: superior work as an undergraduate Physics major and approval of the thesis application.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit
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