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1 - 10 of 14 results for: geolsci 4

GEOLSCI 4: Coevolution of Earth and Life (EARTHSYS 4)

Earth is the only planet in the universe currently known to harbor life. When and how did Earth become inhabited? How have biological activities altered the planet? How have environmental changes affected the evolution of life? Are we living in a sixth mass extinction? In this course, we will develop and use the tools of geology, paleontology, geochemistry, and modeling that allow us to reconstruct Earth's 4.5 billion year history and to reconstruct the interactions between life and its host planet over the past 4 billion years. We will also ask what this long history can tell us about life's likely future on Earth. We will also use One half-day field trip.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

GEOLSCI 5: Living on the Edge (EARTH 15)

A weekend field trip along the Pacific Coast. Tour local beaches, geology, and landforms with expert guides from the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences. Enjoy a BBQ dinner and stay overnight in tents along the Santa Cruz coast. Get to know faculty and graduate students in Stanford Earth. Requirements: Two campus meetings and weekend field trip (Spring Quarter: section 01, April 13-14; section 02, April 27-28; OR section 03, May 4&5) to Pacific Coast. Enrollment limited to 25 per weekend. Freshman have priority. If you are interested in signing up for the course, complete this form: https://goo.gl/forms/Ql6st0EwB6z3iCsq2. The form will open February 10, 2019.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1

GEOLSCI 122: Planetary Systems: Dynamics and Origins (GEOLSCI 222, GEOPHYS 122)

(Students with a strong background in mathematics and the physical sciences should register for 222.) Motions of planets and smaller bodies, energy transport in planetary systems, composition, structure and dynamics of planetary atmospheres, cratering on planetary surfaces, properties of meteorites, asteroids and comets, extrasolar planets, and planetary formation. Prerequisite: some background in the physical sciences, especially astronomy, geophysics, or physics. Students need instructor approval to take the course for 2 or 4 units.

GEOLSCI 135: Sedimentary Geochemistry and Analysis (GEOLSCI 235)

Introduction to research methods in sedimentary geochemistry. Proper laboratory techniques and strategies for generating reliable data applicable to any future labwork will be emphasized. This research-based course will examine how the geochemistry of sedimentary rocks informs us about local and global environmental conditions during deposition. Students will collect geochemical data from a measured stratigraphic section in the western United States. These samples will be collected during a four-day field trip at the end of spring break (attendance encouraged but not required). In lab, students will learn low-temperature geochemical techniques focusing on the cycling of biogeochemical elements (O, C, S, and Fe) in marine sediments throughout Earth history. The focus will be on geochemistry of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks (shale) but the geochemistry of carbonates will also be explored. This is a lab-based course complemented with lectures. Students who wish to take the course for less than 4 units must receive approval from the instructor. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

GEOLSCI 163H: Big Earth Hackathon Water Challenge (CEE 163H, EARTH 163H)

Participate in Stanford's inaugural Big Earth Hackathon Water Challenge by finding an innovative solution to a planetary water problem. Students are tasked to come up with a solution to a water related problem over a seven week period. Projects can be software, hardware, or policy related solutions to important water issues. Students (working individually or in teams of 2-4) are encouraged to pursue a problem of their own interest, but will be provided several opportunities to hear of projects ideas from faculty and industry leaders.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Fong, D. (PI)

GEOLSCI 180: Igneous Processes (GEOLSCI 280)

For juniors, seniors and beginning graduate students in Earth Sciences. Structure and physical properties of magmas; use of phase equilibria and mineral barometers and thermometers to determine conditions of magmatic processes; melting and magmatic lineages as a function of tectonic setting; processes that control magma composition including fractional crystallization, partial melting, and assimilation; petrogenetic use of trace elements and isotopes. Optional labs emphasize identification of volcanic and plutonic rocks in thin section and interpretation of rock textures. Students taking the lab component should enroll in 4 units, as required for the Geological Sciences major; for the lab, GS 102, 103, or consent of instructor are prerequisites.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Stebbins, J. (PI)

GEOLSCI 185: Volcanology (GEOLSCI 285A)

For juniors, seniors, and beginning graduate students. Eruptive processes that create volcanic deposits and landforms; shield, stratocone, and composite volcanoes, lava dome fields; calderas. Control of magma viscosity and water content on eruptive style. Fluid dynamic controls on the characteristics of lavas and pyroclastic flows. Submarine and subglacial eruptions and interaction of magma with groundwater. Rhyolitic supereruptions and flood basalts: effects on climate and atmospheric chemistry, relation to extinction events. Volcanic hazards and mitigating risk. Geophysical monitoring of active volcanoes. Volcanic-hosted geothermal systems and mineral resources. Those taking the class for 4 units will complete a 3-hour weekly lab that emphasizes recognizing types of lavas and products of explosive eruptions in hand specimen and thin section. Prerequisite: 1, for those taking the course for 3 units; 103 and 104 or equivalent for those taking the course for 4 units.
| UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci

GEOLSCI 204: Introduction to Petrology (GEOLSCI 104)

The origin of igneous and metamorphic rocks as a function of geologic and plate tectonic setting. How to determine the temperature and pressure conditions of formation from mineral assemblages, textures, and compositions. Undergraduate students majoring in Geological Sciences must take the course for 4 units and complete a weekly lab section examining rocks in thin section. Prerequisite: introductory geology course, GEOLSCI102; those taking the lab must also have completed GEOLSCI103 or have equivalent experience with a petrographic microscope.

GEOLSCI 222: Planetary Systems: Dynamics and Origins (GEOLSCI 122, GEOPHYS 122)

(Students with a strong background in mathematics and the physical sciences should register for 222.) Motions of planets and smaller bodies, energy transport in planetary systems, composition, structure and dynamics of planetary atmospheres, cratering on planetary surfaces, properties of meteorites, asteroids and comets, extrasolar planets, and planetary formation. Prerequisite: some background in the physical sciences, especially astronomy, geophysics, or physics. Students need instructor approval to take the course for 2 or 4 units.
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