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21 - 30 of 59 results for: cs 106a

CS 100A: Problem-solving Lab for CS106A

Additional problem solving practice for the introductory CS course CS 106A. Sections are designed to allow students to acquire a deeper understanding of CS and its applications, work collaboratively, and develop a mastery of the material. Limited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Concurrent enrollment in CS 106A required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Parlante, N. (PI)

CS 105: Introduction to Computers

For non-technical majors. What computers are and how they work. Practical experience in programming. Construction of computer programs and basic design techniques. A survey of Internet technology and the basics of computer hardware. Students in technical fields and students looking to acquire programming skills should take 106A or 106X. Students with prior computer science experience at the level of 106 or above require consent of instructor. Prerequisite: minimal math skills.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 106A: Programming Methodology

Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: program design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of respective languages. Uses the Python programming language. No prior programming experience required. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Parlante, N. (PI)

CS 106B: Programming Abstractions

Abstraction and its relation to programming. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to time and space complexity analysis. Uses the programming language C++ covering its basic facilities. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 106E: Exploration of Computing

A follow up class to CS106A for non-majors which will both provide practical web programming skills and cover essential computing topics including computer security and privacy. Additional topics will include digital representation of images and music, an exploration of how the Internet works, and a look at the internals of the computer. Students taking the course for 4 units will be required to carry out supplementary programming assignments in addition to the course's regular assignments. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 106X: Programming Abstractions (Accelerated)

Intensive version of 106B for students with a strong programming background interested in a rigorous treatment of the topics at an accelerated pace. Significant amount of additional advanced material and substantially more challenging projects. Some projects may relate to CS department research. Prerequisite: excellence in 106A or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Stepp, M. (PI)

CS 141: Introduction to Computer Sound

Core mathematics and methods for computer sound with applications to computer science. Background on digital signal processing; time- and frequency-domain methods. Project-focussed exploration of computer sound areas: fundamentals of sound analysis & synthesis, robotics and learning (sound features, filterbanks & deep learning, perception, localization, tracking, manipulation), speech (recognition, synthesis), virtual and augmented reality (3D auralization, HRTFs, reverberation), computational acoustics (wave simulation, physics-based modeling, animation sound), computer music (music synthesis, instrument modeling, audio effects, historical aspects), games (game audio, music and sound design, middleware), hardware acceleration (architectures, codecs, synthesizers). Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent programming experience.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 181: Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy

Ethical and social issues related to the development and use of computer technology. Ethical theory, and social, political, and legal considerations. Scenarios in problem areas: privacy, reliability and risks of complex systems, and responsibility of professionals for applications and consequences of their work. Prerequisite: 106A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 198: Teaching Computer Science

Students lead a discussion section of 106A while learning how to teach a programming language at the introductory level. Focus is on teaching skills, techniques, and course specifics. Application and interview required; see http://cs198.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 209: Law, Bias, & Algorithms (CSRE 230, MS&E 330, SOC 279)

Human decision making is increasingly being displaced by predictive algorithms. Judges sentence defendants based on statistical risk scores; regulators take enforcement actions based on predicted violations; advertisers target materials based on demographic attributes; and employers evaluate applicants and employees based on machine-learned models. A predominant concern with the rise of such algorithmic decision making is that it may replicate or exacerbate human bias. Algorithms might discriminate, for instance, based on race or gender. This course surveys the legal and ethical principles for assessing the equity of algorithms, describes techniques for designing fair systems, and considers how antidiscrimination law and the design of algorithms may need to evolve to account for machine bias. Concepts will be developed in part through guided in-class coding exercises. Admission is by consent of instructor and is limited to 20 students. Grading is based on response papers, class participation, and a final project. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent knowledge of coding.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Goel, S. (PI)
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