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11 - 20 of 35 results for: bruce cain

ENVRES 398: Directed Reading in Environment and Resources

Under supervision of an E-IPER affiliated faculty member on a subject of mutual interest. Joint M.S. students must submit an Independent Study Agreement for approval. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Algee-Hewitt, M. (PI) ; Ardoin, N. (PI) ; Arrigo, K. (PI) ; Asner, G. (PI) ; Banerjee, B. (PI) ; Barnett, W. (PI) ; Barry, M. (PI) ; Bendavid, E. (PI) ; Benson, S. (PI) ; Billington, S. (PI) ; Block, B. (PI) ; Boehm, A. (PI) ; Brandt, A. (PI) ; Brown, J. (PI) ; Burke, M. (PI) ; Caers, J. (PI) ; Cain, B. (PI) ; Caldeira, K. (PI) ; Caldwell, M. (PI) ; Casciotti, K. (PI) ; Chamberlain, P. (PI) ; Cohen, J. (PI) ; Comello, S. (PI) ; Criddle, C. (PI) ; Crowder, L. (PI) ; Cullen, M. (PI) ; Curran, L. (PI) ; Daily, G. (PI) ; Davis, J. (PI) ; De Leo, G. (PI) ; Diffenbaugh, N. (PI) ; Dirzo, R. (PI) ; Dunbar, R. (PI) ; Durham, W. (PI) ; Ehrlich, A. (PI) ; Ehrlich, P. (PI) ; Ernst, W. (PI) ; Falcon, W. (PI) ; Fendorf, S. (PI) ; Ferguson, J. (PI) ; Field, C. (PI) ; Fischer, M. (PI) ; Frank, Z. (PI) ; Freyberg, D. (PI) ; Fringer, O. (PI) ; Fukami, T. (PI) ; Fukuyama, F. (PI) ; Gerritsen, M. (PI) ; Gorelick, S. (PI) ; Granovetter, M. (PI) ; Hadly, E. (PI) ; Horne, R. (PI) ; Iancu, D. (PI) ; Jackson, R. (PI) ; Jacobson, M. (PI) ; Jones, J. (PI) ; Karl, T. (PI) ; Kennedy, D. (PI) ; Kennedy, D. (PI) ; Kennedy, J. (PI) ; Knutson, B. (PI) ; Kolstad, C. (PI) ; Koseff, J. (PI) ; Kovscek, A. (PI) ; LaBeaud, D. (PI) ; Lambin, E. (PI) ; Leape, J. (PI) ; Lee, H. (PI) ; Lepech, M. (PI) ; Levitt, R. (PI) ; Lobell, D. (PI) ; Luby, S. (PI) ; Luthy, R. (PI) ; Mach, K. (PI) ; Martinez, J. (PI) ; Masters, G. (PI) ; Matson, P. (PI) ; McAdam, D. (PI) ; McFarland, D. (PI) ; McGehee, M. (PI) ; Meskell, L. (PI) ; Michalak, A. (PI) ; Micheli, F. (PI) ; Miller, D. (PI) ; Miller, G. (PI) ; Monismith, S. (PI) ; Mooney, H. (PI) ; Mordecai, E. (PI) ; Nall, C. (PI) ; Naylor, R. (PI) ; Ortolano, L. (PI) ; Palumbi, S. (PI) ; Peay, K. (PI) ; Plambeck, E. (PI) ; Powell, W. (PI) ; Rafinejad, D. (PI) ; Rajagopal, R. (PI) ; Rao, H. (PI) ; Reichelstein, S. (PI) ; Reicher, D. (PI) ; Ritts, B. (PI) ; Sapolsky, R. (PI) ; Satz, D. (PI) ; Sawe, N. (PI) ; Schoolnik, G. (PI) ; Schultz, K. (PI) ; Seetah, K. (PI) ; Shiv, B. (PI) ; Simonson, I. (PI) ; Sivas, D. (PI) ; Soule, S. (PI) ; Stedman, S. (PI) ; Suckale, J. (PI) ; Sweeney, J. (PI) ; Szeptycki, L. (PI) ; Thomas, L. (PI) ; Thompson, B. (PI) ; Tuljapurkar, S. (PI) ; Vitousek, P. (PI) ; Wara, M. (PI) ; Weinstein, J. (PI) ; Weyant, J. (PI) ; White, R. (PI) ; Wilcox, M. (PI) ; Wolfe, M. (PI) ; Zoback, M. (PI)

HISTORY 151: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ARTHIST 152, ENGLISH 124, POLISCI 124A)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

LAW 7057: What The 2018 Elections Told Us And How They Help Us See How Campaigns Can Win In 2020

The frequency of American elections means that we're never that far away from the next contest. This course is situated shortly after the conclusion of the 2018 midterm elections at the very start of the invisible primary that precedes the 2020 presidential campaign. It will provide students with a behind-the-scenes understanding of how campaigns work. Each week, we will explore a different topic related to high-profile campaigns -- policy formation, communications, grassroots strategy, digital outreach, campaign finance -- and feature prominent guest speakers who have served and will serve in senior roles on both Democratic and Republican campaigns. Our goal is to discern the lessons learned from the 2018 midterm elections, and how they will inform our understanding of what will happen in the 2020 presidential contest. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Final Paper. Cross-listed with Communication ( COMM 153A, 253A), Political Science ( POLISCI 72), and Public Policy ( PUBLPOL 146, 246).
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

POLISCI 72: What The 2018 Elections Told Us And How They Help Us See How Campaigns Can Win In 2020 (COMM 153A, COMM 253A, PUBLPOL 146, PUBLPOL 246)

(Same as LAW 7057). The frequency of American elections means that we¿re never that far away from the next contest. This course is situated shortly after the conclusion of the 2018 midterm elections at the very start of the invisible primary that precedes the 2020 presidential campaign. It will provide students with a behind-the-scenes understanding of how campaigns work. Each week, we will explore a different topic related to high-profile campaigns -- policy formation, communications, grassroots strategy, digital outreach, campaign finance -- and feature prominent guest speakers who have served and will serve in senior roles on both Democratic and Republican campaigns. Our goal is to discern the lessons learned from the 2018 midterm elections, and how they will inform our understanding of what will happen in the 2020 presidential contest
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 73: Energy Policy in California and the West (CEE 263G, PUBLPOL 73)

This seminar provides an in-depth analysis of the role of California state agencies and Western energy organizations in driving energy policy development, technology innovation, and market structures, in California, the West and internationally. The course covers three areas: 1) roles and responsibilities of key state agencies and Western energy organizations; 2) current and evolving energy and climate policies; and 3) development of the 21st century electricity system in California and the West. The seminar will also provide students a guideline of what to expect in professional working environment. nnSpecific meeting dates for the course are as follows: April 27 10am-2pm/ May 18 10am-1pm/ June 1 10am-1pm
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

POLISCI 75: The 2018 Midterm Election: Making Your Voice Heard

Elections are critical to determining the direction of this country, but how do you get involved in ways beyond voting? How do campaigns work on a practical level? How can students make a difference in the upcoming midterm elections? This class offers an opportunity to gain knowledge of and firsthand experience in an American elections. Course credit is based on classroom time, reading time and time spent on volunteer work. Students in this course will be required to participate in some way in the upcoming US Midterm election. This could mean undertaking one or more activities such as training for and serving as a poll worker, working for groups that are registering voters, or volunteering for a campaign. Students are responsible for finding their election-related opportunity, but they may contact Stephanie Burbank about options and contact information. Once you determine what activity you will be volunteering for, please fill out this form: http://web.stanford.edu/~sburbank/PS75.fb. If you have any questions, please reach out to the instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 102: Politics and Public Policy (AMSTUD 123X, PUBLPOL 101, PUBLPOL 201)

American political institutions (the Presidency, Congress, and the Court) and political processes (the formation of political attitudes and voting) have for some time now been criticized as inadequate to the task of making modern public policy. Against the backdrop of American culture and political history we examine how public policy has been and is being made. We use theories from Political Science and Economics to assess the state of the American system and the policy making process. We use case studies and lectures to analyze contemporary issues including environmental policy, taxes and spending , gun control , economic growth and inequality and mobility. In some of these issue areas we use comparative data from other countries to see how the U.S. is doing relative to other countries. In addition to class room lecture and discussion, student groups are formed to analyze policy issues of relevance to them. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to enroll in this class for five units.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 124A: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ARTHIST 152, ENGLISH 124, HISTORY 151)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 209: Curricular Practical Training

Qualified Political Science students obtain employment in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree programs. Meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. The student is responsible for arranging their own internship/employment and gaining faculty sponsorship. Prior to enrolling, students must complete a petition form available on the Political Science website ( politicalscience.stanford.edu/undergraduate-program/forms). The petition is due no later the end of week one of the quarter in which the student intends to enroll. If the CPT is for Summer, the petition form is due by May 31. An offer letter will need to be submitted along with the petition. At the completion of the CPT quarter, a final report must be submitted to the faculty sponsor documenting the work done and its relevance to Political Science. This course be repeated for credit up to 3 times but will not count toward the Political Science major or minor requirements.
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

POLISCI 229: Directed Reading and Research in American Politics

For undergraduates. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on American politics. To be considered for enrollment, interested students must complete the directed reading petition form available on the Political Science website before the end of week 1 of the quarter in which they'd like to enroll. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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