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  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

1 - 10 of 3891 results for: autumn 2020

AA 100: Introduction to Aeronautics and Astronautics

This class introduces the basics of aeronautics and astronautics through applied physics, hands-on activities, and real world examples. The principles of fluid flow, flight, and propulsion for aircraft will be illustrated, including the creation of lift and drag, aerodynamic performance including takeoff, climb, range, and landing. The principles of orbits, maneuvers, space environment, and propulsion for spacecraft will be illustrated. Students will be exposed to the history and challenges of aeronautics and astronautics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

AA 121Q: It IS Rocket Science!

It's an exciting time for space exploration. Companies like SpaceX and Blue Origin are launching rockets into space and bringing them back for reuse. NASA is developing the world's most powerful rocket. Startups are deploying constellations of hundreds of cubesats for communications, navigation, and earth monitoring. The human race has recently gotten a close look at Pluto, soft landed on a comet, and orbited two asteroids. The upcoming launch of the James Webb Space Telescope will allow astronomers to look closer to the beginning of time than ever before. The workings of space systems remain mysterious to most people, but in this seminar we'll pull back the curtain for a look at the basics of "rocket science." How does a SpaceX rocket get into space? How do Skybox satellites capture images for Google Earth? How did the New Horizons probe find its way to Pluto? How do we communicate with spacecraft that are so distant? We'll explore these topics and a range of others during the quarter more »
It's an exciting time for space exploration. Companies like SpaceX and Blue Origin are launching rockets into space and bringing them back for reuse. NASA is developing the world's most powerful rocket. Startups are deploying constellations of hundreds of cubesats for communications, navigation, and earth monitoring. The human race has recently gotten a close look at Pluto, soft landed on a comet, and orbited two asteroids. The upcoming launch of the James Webb Space Telescope will allow astronomers to look closer to the beginning of time than ever before. The workings of space systems remain mysterious to most people, but in this seminar we'll pull back the curtain for a look at the basics of "rocket science." How does a SpaceX rocket get into space? How do Skybox satellites capture images for Google Earth? How did the New Horizons probe find its way to Pluto? How do we communicate with spacecraft that are so distant? We'll explore these topics and a range of others during the quarter. We'll cover just enough physics and math to determine where to look in the sky for a spacecraft, planet, or star. Then we'll check our math by going outside for an evening pizza party observing these objects in the night sky. We'll also visit a spacecraft production facility or Mission Operations Center to see theory put into practice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Barrows, A. (PI)

AA 131: Space Flight

This class is all about how to build a spacecraft. It is designed to introduce undergraduate engineering students to the engineering fundamentals of conceiving, designing, implementing, and operating satellites and other space systems. Topics include orbital dynamics, attitude dynamics, mission design, and subsystem technologies. The space environment and the seven classic spacecraft subsystems - propulsion, attitude control and navigation, structure, thermal, power, telemetry and command, and payload - will be explored in detail. Prerequisites: Freshman-level physics, basic calculus and differential equations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

AA 141: Atmospheric Flight

From people's initial dreams and theories of flight to future design problems, this class introduces students to flight in the atmosphere and the multidisciplinary challenges of aircraft design. We will discuss how new approaches to airplane propulsion, structures, autonomy, and aerodynamics can lead to environmentally sustainable future transportation, supersonic flight, and personal air vehicles. We will look at how local companies are developing autonomous aircraft, inspired by natural flyers, to systems that will provide ubiquitous internet access flying at twice the altitude of airliners. Prerequisites: MATH 20, 21 or equivalents; elementary physics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

AA 151: Lightweight Structures

The development of lightweight structures aids in enhancing the robustness, efficiency, and cost of aerospace systems. In this course, the theoretical principles used to analyze stress-strain behavior, beam bending, torsion, and thin-walled structures will be reviewed and exercised. In addition, students will study structures under various loading conditions found in real-world applications such as the design of airframes, high-altitude balloons, and solar sails. Students from various disciplines of engineering can benefit from this course. ENGR 14 (Introduction to Solid Mechanics) is a highly recommended prerequisite.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

AA 174A: Principles of Robot Autonomy I (AA 274A, CS 237A, EE 260A)

Basic principles for endowing mobile autonomous robots with perception, planning, and decision-making capabilities. Algorithmic approaches for robot perception, localization, and simultaneous localization and mapping; control of non-linear systems, learning-based control, and robot motion planning; introduction to methodologies for reasoning under uncertainty, e.g., (partially observable) Markov decision processes. Extensive use of the Robot Operating System (ROS) for demonstrations and hands-on activities. Prerequisites: CS 106A or equivalent, CME 100 or equivalent (for linear algebra), and CME 106 or equivalent (for probability theory).
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

AA 190: Directed Research and Writing in Aero/Astro

For undergraduates. Experimental or theoretical work under faculty direction, and emphasizing development of research and communication skills. Written report(s) and letter grade required; if this is not appropriate, enroll in 199. Consult faculty in area of interest for appropriate topics, involving one of the graduate research groups or other special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of student services manager and instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit

AA 199: Independent Study in Aero/Astro

Directed reading, lab, or theoretical work for undergraduate students. Consult faculty in area of interest for appropriate topics involving one of the graduate research groups or other special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

AA 212: Advanced Feedback Control Design

Analysis and design techniques for multivariable feedback systems. State-space concepts, observability, controllability, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, stability, and canonical representations. Approaches for robust feedback control design, chiefly H2, H-infinity, and mu-synthesis. System identification and adaptive control design. Use of computer-aided design with MATLAB. Prerequisite: ENGR 105, ENGR 205. Recommended: Linear algebra ( EE 263 or equivalent).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
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