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1 - 10 of 75 results for: artificial intelligence

AMSTUD 106A: A.I.: Artificial Intelligence in Fiction (ENGLISH 106)

From self-driving cars to bots that alter democratic elections, artificial intelligence is growing increasingly powerful and prevalent in our everyday lives. Literature has long been speculating about the techno-utopia¿and catastrophe¿that A.I. could usher in. Indeed, literature itself presents us with a kind of A.I. in the many characters that speak and think in its pages. But how do we classify an intelligence as ¿artificial¿ or not? Is there a clear boundary that demarcates bodies from machines? What, if anything, separates the ¿genre¿ of technology from that of literature? What classifies literature as ¿science fiction,¿ ¿scientific,¿ ¿futuristic,¿ ¿psychological,¿ or ¿dystopian¿? And can technology or literature ever overcome the ultimate division between all intelligences¿the problem of other minds? This course consists in curated multi-genre combinations of literature, philosophy, film, and television that explore what makes someone¿or something¿a person in our world today. Special events will include celebrating the current bicentennial of Mary Shelley¿s Frankenstein (1818) in Stanford Special Collections; a possible visit to Stanford¿s A.I. Laboratory; and chatting with the ELIZA chatbot.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Tackett, J. (PI)

ANES 208A: Data Science for Digital Health and Precision Medicine

How will digital health, low-cost patient-generated and genomic data enable precision medicine to transform health care? This Everyone Included¿ course from Stanford Medicine X and SHC Clinical Inference will provide an overview of data science principles and showcase real world solutions being created to advance precision medicine through implementation of digital health tools, machine learning and artificial intelligence approaches. This class will feature thought leaders and luminaries who are patients, technologists, providers, researchers and leading innovators from academia and industry. This course is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Lunch will be provided.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 128A: The Boundaries of Humanity: Humans, Animals and Machines in the Age of Biotechnology

Advances in research and technology are blurring the boundaries between humans, animals, and machines, challenging conventional notions of human nature. Seminar explores the question of what it now means to be human and the personal, social, and ethical implications of our advancing technologies through the lens of various disciplines, including anthropology, cognitive psychology, neuroscience, genetics, evolutionary biology, biotechnology, and artificial intelligence. Includes guest speakers from fields and industries where important questions are being raised.
Last offered: Spring 2016

BIO 175: Collective Behavior and Distributed Intelligence (SYMSYS 275)

This course will explore possibilities for student research projects based on presentations of faculty research. We will cover a broad range of topics within the general area of collective behavior, both natural and artificial. Students will build on faculty presentations to develop proposals for future projects.
Last offered: Spring 2018

CEE 329: Artificial Intelligence Applications in the AEC Industry

Through weekly lectures given by prominent researchers, practicing professionals, and entrepreneurs, this class will examine important industry problems and critically assess corresponding AI directions in both academia and industry. Students will gain an understanding of how AI can be used to provide solutions in the architecture, engineering, and construction industry and asses the technology, feasibility, and corresponding implementation effort. Students are expected to participate actively in the lectures and discussions, submit triweekly reflection writings, and present their own evaluation of existing solutions. Enrollment limited to 12 students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Fischer, M. (PI)

CEE 329S: Seminar on Artificial Intelligence Applications in the AEC Industry

Through weekly lectures given by prominent researchers, practicing professionals, and entrepreneurs, this class will examine important industry problems and critically assess corresponding AI directions in both academia and industry. Students will gain an understanding of how AI can be used to provide solutions in the architecture, engineering, and construction industry and asses the technology, feasibility, and corresponding implementation effort. Students are expected to actively prepare for and participate in all lectures and corresponding discussions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

COMM 100S: Introduction to Digital Labor

Digital technologies have had a profound influence on our economy, the ways we communicate, and the ways in which we work. This course will provide a lens through which to understand digital labor and digital work today. We will explore the ideological and cultural values of Silicon Valley and their role in shaping the new business models of the Internet Age (such as crowdsourcing, the sharing economy, and humans-as-a-service). We will examine the past, present, and future of mechanisms of workplace control (from clocks to algorithmic management) and the implications of the digital turn on spatial and material dimensions of labor. Finally, we will turn our attention toward possible futures of work, given the increasing presence of automation and artificial intelligence in the workplace. By engaging with social scientific analyses and popular media, students will leave the course with a greater appreciation of worker perspectives and challenges in the digital era.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CS 18SI: Geopolitical Ramifications of Technological Advances

William Janeway describes the relationship between technological development, capital markets, and the government as a three-player game. Scientists and entrepreneurs develop breakthrough innovations, aided and amplified by financial capital. Meanwhile, the government serves to either subsidize (as in wartime) or stymie (through regulations) technological development. Often, the advances in economic and military might due to technological advances lead to conflicts between competing countries, whether Japan and the U.S. in the 1970s or China and the U.S. today. Within societies, technological innovation drives outcomes like increased life expectancy, wealth inequality, and in rare cases changes to paradigms of daily life. In this discussion-driven course, we will explore the ripple effects that technological developments have had and will continue to have on the geopolitical world stage, focusing on trends we as computer scientists are uniquely positioned to understand and predict the ramifications of. Prerequisites: The following are not required but will facilitate understanding of the topics covered: computer systems ( CS 110+), artificial intelligence ( CS 221, CS 231N, CS 229, or CS 230), and theory ( CS 161, cryptography).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Sahami, M. (PI)

CS 21SI: AI for Social Good

Students will learn about and apply cutting-edge artificial intelligence techniques to real-world social good spaces (such as healthcare, government, education, and environment). Taught jointly by CS+Social Good and the Stanford AI Group, the aim of the class is to empower students to apply these techniques outside of the classroom. The class will focus on techniques from machine learning and deep learning, including regression, support vector machines (SVMs), neural networks, convolutional neural networks (CNNs), and recurrent neural networks (RNNs). The course alternates between lectures on machine learning theory and discussions with invited speakers, who will challenge students to apply techniques in their social good domains. Students complete weekly coding assignments reinforcing machine learning concepts and applications. Prerequisites: programming experience at the level of CS107, mathematical fluency at the level of CS103, comfort with probability at the level of CS109 (or equivalent). Application required for enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Piech, C. (PI)

CS 22A: The Social & Economic Impact of Artificial Intelligence (INTLPOL 200)

(Formerly IPS 200.) Recent advances in computing may place us at the threshold of a unique turning point in human history. Soon we are likely to entrust management of our environment, economy, security, infrastructure, food production, healthcare, and to a large degree even our personal activities, to artificially intelligent computer systems. The prospect of "turning over the keys" to increasingly autonomous systems raises many complex and troubling questions. How will society respond as versatile robots and machine-learning systems displace an ever-expanding spectrum of blue- and white-collar workers? Will the benefits of this technological revolution be broadly distributed or accrue to a lucky few? How can we ensure that these systems respect our ethical principles when they make decisions at speeds and for rationales that exceed our ability to comprehend? What, if any, legal rights and responsibilities should we grant them? And should we regard them merely as sophisticated tools or as a newly emerging form of life? The goal of CS22 is to equip students with the intellectual tools, ethical foundation, and psychological framework to successfully navigate the coming age of intelligent machines.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Kaplan, J. (PI)
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