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31 - 40 of 88 results for: artificial intelligence

CS 421: Designing AI to Cultivate Human Well-Being

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has the potential to drive us towards a better future for all of humanity, but it also comes with significant risks and challenges. At its best, AI can help humans mitigate climate change, diagnose and treat diseases more effectively, enhance learning, and improve access to capital throughout the world. But it also has the potential to exacerbate human biases, destroy trust in information flow, displace entire industries, and amplify inequality throughout the world. We have arrived at a pivotal moment in the development of the technology in which we must establish a foundation for how we will design AI to capture the positive potential and mitigate the negative risks. To do this, we must be intentional about human-centered design because, ¿Only once we have thought hard about what sort of future we want, will we be able to begin steering a course toward a desirable future. If we don¿t know what we want, we¿re unlikely to get it.¿ Thus, building AI must be a more »
Artificial Intelligence (AI) has the potential to drive us towards a better future for all of humanity, but it also comes with significant risks and challenges. At its best, AI can help humans mitigate climate change, diagnose and treat diseases more effectively, enhance learning, and improve access to capital throughout the world. But it also has the potential to exacerbate human biases, destroy trust in information flow, displace entire industries, and amplify inequality throughout the world. We have arrived at a pivotal moment in the development of the technology in which we must establish a foundation for how we will design AI to capture the positive potential and mitigate the negative risks. To do this, we must be intentional about human-centered design because, ¿Only once we have thought hard about what sort of future we want, will we be able to begin steering a course toward a desirable future. If we don¿t know what we want, we¿re unlikely to get it.¿ Thus, building AI must be an inclusive, interactive, and introspective process guided by an affirmative vision of a beneficial AI-future. The goal of this interdisciplinary class is to bridge the gap between technological and societal objectives: How do we design AI to promote human well-being? The ultimate aim is to provide tools and frameworks to build a more harmonious human society based on cooperation toward a shared vision. Thus, students are trained in basic science to understand what brings about the conditions for human flourishing and will create meaningful AI technologies that aligns with the PACE framework: Has a clear and meaningful purpose, augments human dignity and autonomy, creates a feeling of inclusivity and collaboration, creates shared prosperity and a sense of forward movement (excellence). Toward this end, students work in interdisciplinary teams on a final project and propose a solution that tackles a significant societal challenge by leveraging technology and frameworks on human thriving.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

CS 521: Seminar on AI Safety

In this seminar, we will focus on the challenges in the design of safe and verified AI-based systems. We will explore some of the major problems in this area from the viewpoint of industry and academia. We plan to have a weekly seminar speaker to discuss issues such as verification of AI systems, reward misalignment and hacking, secure and attack-resilient AI systems, diagnosis and repair, issues regarding policy and ethics, as well as the implications of AI safety in automotive industry. Prerequisites: There are no official prerequisites but an introductory course in artificial intelligence is recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

CS 522: Seminar in Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

Artificial intelligence is poised to make radical changes in healthcare, transforming areas such as diagnosis, genomics, surgical robotics, and drug discovery. In the coming years, artificial intelligence has the potential to lower healthcare costs, identify more effective treatments, and facilitate prevention and early detection of diseases. This class is a seminar series featuring prominent researchers, physicians, entrepreneurs, and venture capitalists, all sharing their thoughts on the future of healthcare. We highly encourage students of all backgrounds to enroll (no AI/healthcare background necessary). Speakers and more at shift.stanford.edu/healthai.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Dror, R. (PI)

ECON 152: The Future of Finance (ECON 252, PUBLPOL 364)

This 2-credit course will examine vast changes driven by innovation both from within traditional finance and from new ecosystems in fintech among others. Breathtaking advances in financial theory, big data, machine learning, artificial intelligence, computational capability, IoT, payment systems (e.g. blockchain, crypto currencies), new products (e.g. robo advising, digital lending, crowd funding, smart contracts), new trading processes (e.g. algorithmic trading, AI-driven sales & trading), and new markets (e.g. ETFs, zero-cost products), among others are changing not only how financial and non-financial firms conduct business but also how investors and supervisors view the players and the markets. nWe will discuss critical strategy, policy and legal issues, some resolved and others yet to be (e.g. failed business models, cyber challenges, financial warfare, fake news, bias problems, legal standing for cryptos). The course will feature perspectives from guest speakers including top fin more »
This 2-credit course will examine vast changes driven by innovation both from within traditional finance and from new ecosystems in fintech among others. Breathtaking advances in financial theory, big data, machine learning, artificial intelligence, computational capability, IoT, payment systems (e.g. blockchain, crypto currencies), new products (e.g. robo advising, digital lending, crowd funding, smart contracts), new trading processes (e.g. algorithmic trading, AI-driven sales & trading), and new markets (e.g. ETFs, zero-cost products), among others are changing not only how financial and non-financial firms conduct business but also how investors and supervisors view the players and the markets. nWe will discuss critical strategy, policy and legal issues, some resolved and others yet to be (e.g. failed business models, cyber challenges, financial warfare, fake news, bias problems, legal standing for cryptos). The course will feature perspectives from guest speakers including top finance executives and Silicon Valley entrepreneurs on up-to-the-minute challenges and opportunities in finance. nWe will discuss slowing global growth against the backdrop of ongoing intervention and wildcards in the capital markets of the U.S., Europe, Hong Kong, Singapore, China, India, Japan, the Middle East and Latin America. We will look forward at strategic opportunities and power players appearing and being dethroned in the markets to discuss who is likely to thrive ¿ and not survive ¿ in the new global financial landscape. nnPrerequisites: If you are an undergraduate wishing to take this course, apply by completing the course application and provide a brief bio here: https://forms.gle/9BGYr8brdYwPS8Cu8
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Beder, T. (PI)

ECON 252: The Future of Finance (ECON 152, PUBLPOL 364)

This 2-credit course will examine vast changes driven by innovation both from within traditional finance and from new ecosystems in fintech among others. Breathtaking advances in financial theory, big data, machine learning, artificial intelligence, computational capability, IoT, payment systems (e.g. blockchain, crypto currencies), new products (e.g. robo advising, digital lending, crowd funding, smart contracts), new trading processes (e.g. algorithmic trading, AI-driven sales & trading), and new markets (e.g. ETFs, zero-cost products), among others are changing not only how financial and non-financial firms conduct business but also how investors and supervisors view the players and the markets. nWe will discuss critical strategy, policy and legal issues, some resolved and others yet to be (e.g. failed business models, cyber challenges, financial warfare, fake news, bias problems, legal standing for cryptos). The course will feature perspectives from guest speakers including top fin more »
This 2-credit course will examine vast changes driven by innovation both from within traditional finance and from new ecosystems in fintech among others. Breathtaking advances in financial theory, big data, machine learning, artificial intelligence, computational capability, IoT, payment systems (e.g. blockchain, crypto currencies), new products (e.g. robo advising, digital lending, crowd funding, smart contracts), new trading processes (e.g. algorithmic trading, AI-driven sales & trading), and new markets (e.g. ETFs, zero-cost products), among others are changing not only how financial and non-financial firms conduct business but also how investors and supervisors view the players and the markets. nWe will discuss critical strategy, policy and legal issues, some resolved and others yet to be (e.g. failed business models, cyber challenges, financial warfare, fake news, bias problems, legal standing for cryptos). The course will feature perspectives from guest speakers including top finance executives and Silicon Valley entrepreneurs on up-to-the-minute challenges and opportunities in finance. nWe will discuss slowing global growth against the backdrop of ongoing intervention and wildcards in the capital markets of the U.S., Europe, Hong Kong, Singapore, China, India, Japan, the Middle East and Latin America. We will look forward at strategic opportunities and power players appearing and being dethroned in the markets to discuss who is likely to thrive ¿ and not survive ¿ in the new global financial landscape. nnPrerequisites: If you are an undergraduate wishing to take this course, apply by completing the course application and provide a brief bio here: https://forms.gle/9BGYr8brdYwPS8Cu8
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Beder, T. (PI)

EDUC 234: Curiosity in Artificial Intelligence (PSYCH 240A)

How do we design artificial systems that learn as we do early in life -- as "scientists in the crib" who explore and experiment with our surroundings? How do we make AI "curious" so that it explores without explicit external feedback? Topics draw from cognitive science (intuitive physics and psychology, developmental differences), computational theory (active learning, optimal experiment design), and AI practice (self-supervised learning, deep reinforcement learning). Students present readings and complete both an introductory computational project (e.g. train a neural network on a self-supervised task) and a deeper-dive project in either cognitive science (e.g. design a novel human subject experiment) or AI (e.g. implement and test a curiosity variant in an RL environment). Prerequisites: python familiarity and practical data science (e.g. sklearn or R).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

EDUC 468: Robotics, AI and Design of Future Education (ME 268)

The seminar will feature guest lectures from industry and academia to discuss the state of the affairs in the field of Robotics, Artificial Intelligence (AI), and how that will impact the future Education. The time of robotics/AI are upon us. Within the next 10 to 20 years, many jobs will be replaced by robots/AI. We will cover hot topics in Robotics, AI, how we prepare students for the rise of Robotics/AI, how we Re-design and Re-invent our education to adapt to the new era
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Jiang, L. (PI)

ENGLISH 13Q: Imaginative Realms

This class looks at the tradition of the imagined universe in fiction and poetry. Special topics include magical realism, artificial intelligence, and dystopias. Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. For undergrads only.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ETHICSOC 182: Ethics, Public Policy, and Technological Change (COMM 180, CS 182, PHIL 82, POLISCI 182, PUBLPOL 182)

Examination of recent developments in computing technology and platforms through the lenses of philosophy, public policy, social science, and engineering. Course is organized around four main units: algorithmic decision-making and bias; data privacy and civil liberties; artificial intelligence and autonomous systems; and the power of private computing platforms. Each unit considers the promise, perils, rights, and responsibilities at play in technological developments. Prerequisite: CS106A.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

ETHICSOC 185M: Contemporary Moral Problems (PHIL 72, POLISCI 134P)

This course is an introduction to contemporary ethical thought with a focus on the morality of harming others and saving others from harm. It aims to develop students' ability to think carefully and rationally about moral issues, to acquaint them with modern moral theory, and to encourage them to develop their own considered positions about important real-world issues. In the first part of the course, we will explore fundamental topics in the ethics of harm. Among other questions, we will ask: How extensive are one's moral duties to improve the lives of the less fortunate? When is it permissible to inflict harm on others for the sake of the greater good? Does the moral permissibility of a person's action depend on her intentions? Can a person be harmed by being brought into existence? In the second part of the course, we will turn to practical questions. Some of these will be familiar; for example: Is abortion morally permissible? What obligations do we have to protect the planet for t more »
This course is an introduction to contemporary ethical thought with a focus on the morality of harming others and saving others from harm. It aims to develop students' ability to think carefully and rationally about moral issues, to acquaint them with modern moral theory, and to encourage them to develop their own considered positions about important real-world issues. In the first part of the course, we will explore fundamental topics in the ethics of harm. Among other questions, we will ask: How extensive are one's moral duties to improve the lives of the less fortunate? When is it permissible to inflict harm on others for the sake of the greater good? Does the moral permissibility of a person's action depend on her intentions? Can a person be harmed by being brought into existence? In the second part of the course, we will turn to practical questions. Some of these will be familiar; for example: Is abortion morally permissible? What obligations do we have to protect the planet for the sake of future generations? Other questions we will ask are newer and less well-trodden. These will include: How does the availability of new technology, in particular artificial intelligence, change the moral landscape of the ethics of war? What moral principles should govern the programming and operation of autonomous vehicles?
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER
Instructors: Karhu, T. (PI)
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