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21 - 30 of 88 results for: artificial intelligence

CS 221: Artificial Intelligence: Principles and Techniques

Artificial intelligence (AI) has had a huge impact in many areas, including medical diagnosis, speech recognition, robotics, web search, advertising, and scheduling. This course focuses on the foundational concepts that drive these applications. In short, AI is the mathematics of making good decisions given incomplete information (hence the need for probability) and limited computation (hence the need for algorithms). Specific topics include search, constraint satisfaction, game playing,n Markov decision processes, graphical models, machine learning, and logic. Prerequisites: CS 103 or CS 103B/X, CS 106B or CS 106X, CS 109, and CS 161 (algorithms, probability, and object-oriented programming in Python). We highly recommend comfort with these concepts before taking the course, as we will be building on them with little review.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4

CS 227B: General Game Playing

A general game playing system accepts a formal description of a game to play it without human intervention or algorithms designed for specific games. Hands-on introduction to these systems and artificial intelligence techniques such as knowledge representation, reasoning, learning, and rational behavior. Students create GGP systems to compete with each other and in external competitions. Prerequisite: programming experience. Recommended: 103 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

CS 231C: Computer Vision and Image Analysis of Art

This course presents the application of rigorous image processing, computer vision, machine learning, computer graphics and artificial intelligence techniques to problems in the history and interpretation of fine art paintings, drawings, murals and other two-dimensional works, including abstract art. The course focuses on the aspects of these problems that are unlike those addressed widely elsewhere in computer image analysis applied to physics-constrained images in photographs, videos, and medical images, such as the analysis of brushstrokes and marks, medium, inferring artists¿ working methods, compositional principles, stylometry (quantification of style), the tracing of artistic influence, and art attribution and authentication. The course revisits classic problems, such as image-based object recognition, but in highly non-realistic, stylized artworks. Recommended: One of CS 131 or EE 168 or equivalent; ARTHIST 1B. Prerequisites: Programming proficiency in at least one of C, C++, Python, Matlab or Mathematica and tools/frameworks such as OpenCV or Matlab's Image Processing toolbox.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

CS 247A: Design for Artificial Intelligence

A project-based course that builds on the introduction to design in CS147 by focusing on advanced methods and tools for research, prototyping, and user interface design. Studio based format with intensive coaching and iteration to prepare students for tackling real world design problems. This course takes place entirely in studios; you must plan on attending every studio to take this class. The focus of CS247A is design for human-centered artificial intelligence experiences. What does it mean to design for AI? What is HAI? Let¿s explore what AI actually is and the constraints, opportunities and specialized processes necessary to create AI systems that work effectively for the humans involved. Prerequisites: 147 or equivalent background in design thinking.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

CS 257: Logic and Artificial Intelligence (PHIL 356C)

This is a course at the intersection of philosophical logic and artificial intelligence. After reviewing recent work in AI that has leveraged ideas from logic, we will slow down and study in more detail various components of high-level intelligence and the tools that have been designed to capture those components. Specific areas will include: reasoning about belief and action, causality and counterfactuals, legal and normative reasoning, natural language inference, and Turing-complete logical formalisms including (probabilistic) logic programming and lambda calculus. Our main concern will be understanding the logical tools themselves, including their formal properties and how they relate to other tools such as probability and statistics. At the end, students should expect to have learned a lot more about logic, and also to have a sense for how logic has been and can be used in AI applications. Prerequisites: A background in logic, at least at the level of Phil 151, will be expected. I more »
This is a course at the intersection of philosophical logic and artificial intelligence. After reviewing recent work in AI that has leveraged ideas from logic, we will slow down and study in more detail various components of high-level intelligence and the tools that have been designed to capture those components. Specific areas will include: reasoning about belief and action, causality and counterfactuals, legal and normative reasoning, natural language inference, and Turing-complete logical formalisms including (probabilistic) logic programming and lambda calculus. Our main concern will be understanding the logical tools themselves, including their formal properties and how they relate to other tools such as probability and statistics. At the end, students should expect to have learned a lot more about logic, and also to have a sense for how logic has been and can be used in AI applications. Prerequisites: A background in logic, at least at the level of Phil 151, will be expected. In case a student is willing to put in the extra work to catch up, it may be possible to take the course with background equivalent to Phil 150 or CS 157. A background in AI, at the level of CS 221, would also be very helpful and will at times be expected. 2 unit option only for PhD students past the second year. Course website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cs257/
Last offered: Winter 2018

CS 271: Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare (BIODS 220, BIOMEDIN 220)

Healthcare is one of the most exciting application domains of artificial intelligence, with transformative potential in areas ranging from medical image analysis to electronic health records-based prediction and precision medicine. This course will involve a deep dive into recent advances in AI in healthcare, focusing in particular on deep learning approaches for healthcare problems. We will start from foundations of neural networks, and then study cutting-edge deep learning models in the context of a variety of healthcare data including image, text, multimodal and time-series data. In the latter part of the course, we will cover advanced topics on open challenges of integrating AI in a societal application such as healthcare, including interpretability, robustness, privacy and fairness. The course aims to provide students from diverse backgrounds with both conceptual understanding and practical grounding of cutting-edge research on AI in healthcare.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Yeung, S. (PI)

CS 294A: Research Project in Artificial Intelligence

Student teams under faculty supervision work on research and implementation of a large project in AI. State-of-the-art methods related to the problem domain. Prerequisites: AI course from 220 series, and consent of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2012 | Repeatable for credit

CS 329: Topics in Artificial Intelligence

Advanced material is often taught for the first time as a topics course, perhaps by a faculty member visiting from another institution. May be repeated for credit.
| Repeatable for credit

CS 329M: Topics in Artificial Intelligence: Algorithms of Advanced Machine Learning

This advanced graduate course explores in depth several important classes of algorithms in modern machine learning. We will focus on understanding the mathematical properties of these algorithms in order to gain deeper insights on when and why they perform well. We will also study applications of each algorithm on interesting, real-world settings. Topics include: spectral clustering, tensor decomposition, Hamiltonian Monte Carlo, adversarial training, and variational approximation. Students will learn mathematical techniques for analyzing these algorithms and hands-on experience in using them. We will supplement the lectures with latest papers and there will be a significant research project component to the class. Prerequisites: Probability ( CS 109), linear algebra ( Math 113), machine learning ( CS 229), and some coding experience.
Last offered: Spring 2017

CS 372: Artificial Intelligence for Disease Diagnosis and Information Recommendations

Artificial intelligence, specifically deep learning, stands out as one of the most transformative technologies of the past decade. AI can already outperform humans in several computer vision and natural language processing tasks. However, we still face some of the same limitations and obstacles that led to the demise of the first AI boom phase five decades ago. This research-oriented course will first review and reveal the limitations (e.g., iid assumption on training and testing data, voluminous training data requirement, and lacking interpretability) of some widely used AI algorithms, including convolutional neural networks (CNNs), transformers, reinforcement learning, and generative adversarial networks (GANs). To address these limitations, we will then explore topics including transfer learning for remedying data scarcity, knowledge-guided multimodal learning for improving data diversity, out of distribution generalization, attention mechanisms for enabling Interpretability, meta l more »
Artificial intelligence, specifically deep learning, stands out as one of the most transformative technologies of the past decade. AI can already outperform humans in several computer vision and natural language processing tasks. However, we still face some of the same limitations and obstacles that led to the demise of the first AI boom phase five decades ago. This research-oriented course will first review and reveal the limitations (e.g., iid assumption on training and testing data, voluminous training data requirement, and lacking interpretability) of some widely used AI algorithms, including convolutional neural networks (CNNs), transformers, reinforcement learning, and generative adversarial networks (GANs). To address these limitations, we will then explore topics including transfer learning for remedying data scarcity, knowledge-guided multimodal learning for improving data diversity, out of distribution generalization, attention mechanisms for enabling Interpretability, meta learning, and privacy-preserving training data management. The course will be taught through a combination of lecture and project sessions. Lectures on specialized AI applications (e.g., cancer/depression diagnosis and treatment, AI/VR for surgery, and health education) will feature guest speakers from academia and industry. Students will be assigned to work on an extensive project that is relevant to their fields of study (e.g., CS, Medicine, and Data Science). Projects may involve conducting literature surveys, formulating ideas, and implementing these ideas. Example project topics are but not limited to 1) knowledge guided GANs for improving training data diversity, 2) disease diagnosis via multimodal symptom checking, and 3) fake and biased news/information detection.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
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