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71 - 80 of 80 results for: artificial intelligence

PSYCH 291: Causal Cognition

Causality is central to our understanding of the world and of each other. We think causally when we predict what will happen in the future, infer what happened in the past, and interpret other people's actions and emotions. Causality is intimately linked to explanation -- to answering questions about why something happened. In this discussion-based seminar class, we will first read foundational work in philosophy that introduces the main frameworks for thinking about causation. We will then read some work on formal and computational theories of causation that was inspired by these philosophical frameworks. Equipped with this background, we will study the psychology of causal learning, reasoning, and judgment. We will tackle questions such as: How can we learn about the causal structure of the world through observation and active intervention? What is the relationship between causal reasoning and mental simulation? Why do we select to talk about some causes over others when several causes led to an outcome? Toward the end of the course, we will discuss how what we have learned in psychology about causation may be useful for other fields of inquiry, such as legal science as well as machine learning and artificial intelligence.
Last offered: Spring 2019

PUBLPOL 182: Ethics, Public Policy, and Technological Change (COMM 180, CS 182, ETHICSOC 182, PHIL 82, POLISCI 182)

Examination of recent developments in computing technology and platforms through the lenses of philosophy, public policy, social science, and engineering. Course is organized around four main units: algorithmic decision-making and bias; data privacy and civil liberties; artificial intelligence and autonomous systems; and the power of private computing platforms. Each unit considers the promise, perils, rights, and responsibilities at play in technological developments. Prerequisite: CS106A.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

PUBLPOL 364: The Future of Finance (ECON 152, ECON 252)

(Same as Law 1038) If you are interested in a career in finance or that touches finance (computational science, economics, public policy, legal, regulatory, corporate, other), this course will give you a useful perspective. We will take on hot topics in the current landscape of global financial markets such as how the world has evolved post-financial crisis, how it is being disrupted by FinTech, RegTech, artificial intelligence, crowd financing, blockchain, machine learning & robotics (to name a few), how it is being challenged by IoT, cyber, financial warfare & crypto currency risks (to name a few) and how it is seizing new opportunities in fast-growing areas such as ETFs, new instruments/payment platforms, robo advising, big data & algorithmic trading (to name a few). The course will include guest-lecturer perspectives on how sweeping changes are transforming business models and where the greatest opportunities exist for students entering or touching the world of finance today inclu more »
(Same as Law 1038) If you are interested in a career in finance or that touches finance (computational science, economics, public policy, legal, regulatory, corporate, other), this course will give you a useful perspective. We will take on hot topics in the current landscape of global financial markets such as how the world has evolved post-financial crisis, how it is being disrupted by FinTech, RegTech, artificial intelligence, crowd financing, blockchain, machine learning & robotics (to name a few), how it is being challenged by IoT, cyber, financial warfare & crypto currency risks (to name a few) and how it is seizing new opportunities in fast-growing areas such as ETFs, new instruments/payment platforms, robo advising, big data & algorithmic trading (to name a few). The course will include guest-lecturer perspectives on how sweeping changes are transforming business models and where the greatest opportunities exist for students entering or touching the world of finance today including existing, new and disruptive players. While derivatives and other quantitative concepts will be handled in a non-technical way, some knowledge of finance and the capital markets is presumed. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Final Paper. Consent Application: To apply for this course, students must complete and email to the instructors the Consent Application Form, which is available on the Public Policy Program's website at https://publicpolicy.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate/forms. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Beder, T. (PI)

STATS 315B: Modern Applied Statistics: Data Mining

Two-part sequence. New techniques for predictive and descriptive learning using ideas that bridge gaps among statistics, computer science, and artificial intelligence. Emphasis is on statistical aspects of their application and integration with more standard statistical methodology. Predictive learning refers to estimating models from data with the goal of predicting future outcomes, in particular, regression and classification models. Descriptive learning is used to discover general patterns and relationships in data without a predictive goal, viewed from a statistical perspective as computer automated exploratory analysis of large complex data sets.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Friedman, J. (PI)

SYMSYS 112: Challenges for Language Systems (SYMSYS 212)

Parallel exploration of philosophical and computational approaches to modeling the construction of linguistic meaning. In philosophy of language: lexical sense extension, figurative speech, the semantics/pragmatics interface, contextualism debates. In CS: natural language understanding, from formal compositional models of knowledge representation to statistical and deep learning approaches. We will develop an appreciation of the complexities of language understanding and communication; this will inform discussion of the broader prospects for Artificial Intelligence. Special attention will be paid to epistemological questions on the nature of linguistic explanation, and the relationship between theory and practice. PREREQUISITES: PHIL80; some exposure to philosophy of language and/or computational language processing is recommended.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

SYMSYS 115: Critique of Technology

What is the character of technology? How does technology reveal aspects of human nature and social practices? How does it shape human experience and values? We will survey the history of philosophy of technology -- from ancient and enlightenment ideas, to positivist and phenomenological conceptions -- to develop a deeper understanding of diverse technological worldviews. This will prepare us to consider contemporary questions about the "ethos" of technology. Specific questions will vary depending upon the interests of participants, but may include: ethical and existential challenges posed by artificial intelligence; responsible product design in the "attention economy"; industry regulation and policy issues for information privacy; and the like. PREREQUISITES: PHIL80
Last offered: Spring 2017

SYMSYS 122: Artificial Intelligence: Philosophy, Ethics, & Impact

Recent advances in computing may place us at the threshold of a unique turning point in human history. Soon we are likely to entrust management of our environment, economy, security, infrastructure, food production, healthcare, and to a large degree even our personal activities, to artificially intelligent computer systems. The prospect of "turning over the keys" to increasingly autonomous systems raises many complex and troubling questions. How will society respond as versatile robots and machine-learning systems displace an ever-expanding spectrum of blue- and white-collar workers? Will the benefits of this technological revolution be broadly distributed or accrue to a lucky few? How can we ensure that these systems respect our ethical principles when they make decisions at speeds and for rationales that exceed our ability to comprehend? What, if any, legal rights and responsibilities should we grant them? And should we regard them merely as sophisticated tools or as a newly emerging form of life? The goal of this course is to equip students with the intellectual tools, ethical foundation, and psychological framework to successfully navigate the coming age of intelligent machines.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

SYMSYS 208: Computer Machines and Intelligence

It has become common for us to see in the media news about computer winning a masters in chess, or answering questions on the Jeopardy TV show, or the impact of AI on health, transportation, education, in the labor market and even as an existential threat to mankind. This interest in AI gives rise questions such as: Is it possible for a computer to think? What is thought? Are we computers? Could machines feel emotions or be conscious? Curiously, there is no single, universally accepted definition of Artificial Intelligence. However in view of the rapid dissemination of AI these questions are important not only for experts, but also for all other members of society. This course is intended for students from different majors Interested in learn how the concept of intelligent machine is understood by the researchers in AI. We will study the evolution of AI research, its different approaches, with focus on the tests developed to verify if a machine is intelligent or not. In addition, we wi more »
It has become common for us to see in the media news about computer winning a masters in chess, or answering questions on the Jeopardy TV show, or the impact of AI on health, transportation, education, in the labor market and even as an existential threat to mankind. This interest in AI gives rise questions such as: Is it possible for a computer to think? What is thought? Are we computers? Could machines feel emotions or be conscious? Curiously, there is no single, universally accepted definition of Artificial Intelligence. However in view of the rapid dissemination of AI these questions are important not only for experts, but also for all other members of society. This course is intended for students from different majors Interested in learn how the concept of intelligent machine is understood by the researchers in AI. We will study the evolution of AI research, its different approaches, with focus on the tests developed to verify if a machine is intelligent or not. In addition, we will examine the philosophical problems associated with the concept of intelligent machine. The topics covered will include: Turing test, symbolic AI, connectionist AI, sub- symbolic Ai, Strong AI and Weak AI, Ai singularity, unconventional computing, rationality, intentionality, representation, machine learning, and the possibility of conscious machines.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

SYMSYS 212: Challenges for Language Systems (SYMSYS 112)

Parallel exploration of philosophical and computational approaches to modeling the construction of linguistic meaning. In philosophy of language: lexical sense extension, figurative speech, the semantics/pragmatics interface, contextualism debates. In CS: natural language understanding, from formal compositional models of knowledge representation to statistical and deep learning approaches. We will develop an appreciation of the complexities of language understanding and communication; this will inform discussion of the broader prospects for Artificial Intelligence. Special attention will be paid to epistemological questions on the nature of linguistic explanation, and the relationship between theory and practice. PREREQUISITES: PHIL80; some exposure to philosophy of language and/or computational language processing is recommended.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

SYMSYS 275: Collective Behavior and Distributed Intelligence (BIO 175)

This course will explore possibilities for student research projects based on presentations of faculty research. We will cover a broad range of topics within the general area of collective behavior, both natural and artificial. Students will build on faculty presentations to develop proposals for future projects.
Last offered: Spring 2018
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