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71 - 76 of 76 results for: artificial intelligence

SYMSYS 122: Artificial Intelligence: Philosophy, Ethics, & Impact

Recent advances in computing may place us at the threshold of a unique turning point in human history. Soon we are likely to entrust management of our environment, economy, security, infrastructure, food production, healthcare, and to a large degree even our personal activities, to artificially intelligent computer systems. The prospect of "turning over the keys" to increasingly autonomous systems raises many complex and troubling questions. How will society respond as versatile robots and machine-learning systems displace an ever-expanding spectrum of blue- and white-collar workers? Will the benefits of this technological revolution be broadly distributed or accrue to a lucky few? How can we ensure that these systems respect our ethical principles when they make decisions at speeds and for rationales that exceed our ability to comprehend? What, if any, legal rights and responsibilities should we grant them? And should we regard them merely as sophisticated tools or as a newly emerging form of life? The goal of this course is to equip students with the intellectual tools, ethical foundation, and psychological framework to successfully navigate the coming age of intelligent machines.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2014 | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SYMSYS 161: Applied Symbolic Systems: Venture Capital, Artificial Intelligence, and The Future (SYMSYS 261)

A weekly seminar allowing students the opportunity to discuss and explore applied Symbolic Systems in technology, entrepreneurship, and venture capital. We will explore popular conventions and trends through the lens of numerous deductive and applied Symbolic Systems.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SYMSYS 208: Computer Machines and Intelligence

It has become common for us to see in the media news about computer winning a masters in chess, or answering questions on the Jeopardy TV show, or the impact of AI on health, transportation, education, in the labor market and even as an existential threat to mankind. This interest in AI gives rise questions such as: Is it possible for a computer to think? What is thought? Are we computers? Could machines feel emotions or be conscious? Curiously, there is no single, universally accepted definition of Artificial Intelligence. However in view of the rapid dissemination of AI these questions are important not only for experts, but also for all other members of society. This course is intended for students from different majors Interested in learn how the concept of intelligent machine is understood by the researchers in AI. We will study the evolution of AI research, its different approaches, with focus on the tests developed to verify if a machine is intelligent or not. In addition, we wi more »
It has become common for us to see in the media news about computer winning a masters in chess, or answering questions on the Jeopardy TV show, or the impact of AI on health, transportation, education, in the labor market and even as an existential threat to mankind. This interest in AI gives rise questions such as: Is it possible for a computer to think? What is thought? Are we computers? Could machines feel emotions or be conscious? Curiously, there is no single, universally accepted definition of Artificial Intelligence. However in view of the rapid dissemination of AI these questions are important not only for experts, but also for all other members of society. This course is intended for students from different majors Interested in learn how the concept of intelligent machine is understood by the researchers in AI. We will study the evolution of AI research, its different approaches, with focus on the tests developed to verify if a machine is intelligent or not. In addition, we will examine the philosophical problems associated with the concept of intelligent machine. The topics covered will include: Turing test, symbolic AI, connectionist AI, sub- symbolic Ai, Strong AI and Weak AI, Ai singularity, unconventional computing, rationality, intentionality, representation, machine learning, and the possibility of conscious machines.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SYMSYS 212: Challenges for Language Systems (SYMSYS 112)

Parallel exploration of philosophical and computational approaches to modeling the construction of linguistic meaning. In philosophy of language: lexical sense extension, figurative speech, the semantics/pragmatics interface, contextualism debates. In CS: natural language understanding, from formal compositional models of knowledge representation to statistical and deep learning approaches. We will develop an appreciation of the complexities of language understanding and communication; this will inform discussion of the broader prospects for Artificial Intelligence. Special attention will be paid to epistemological questions on the nature of linguistic explanation, and the relationship between theory and practice. PREREQUISITES: PHIL80; some exposure to philosophy of language and/or computational language processing is recommended.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SYMSYS 261: Applied Symbolic Systems: Venture Capital, Artificial Intelligence, and The Future (SYMSYS 161)

A weekly seminar allowing students the opportunity to discuss and explore applied Symbolic Systems in technology, entrepreneurship, and venture capital. We will explore popular conventions and trends through the lens of numerous deductive and applied Symbolic Systems.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SYMSYS 275: Collective Behavior and Distributed Intelligence (BIO 175)

This course will explore possibilities for student research projects based on presentations of faculty research. We will cover a broad range of topics within the general area of collective behavior, both natural and artificial. Students will build on faculty presentations to develop proposals for future projects.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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