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41 - 50 of 71 results for: artificial intelligence

LAW 4043: The Social & Economic Impact of Artificial Intelligence

Recent advances in computing may place us at the threshold of a unique turning point in human history. Soon we are likely to entrust management of our environment, economy, security, infrastructure, food production, healthcare, and to a large degree even our personal activities, to artificially intelligent computer systems. The prospect of "turning over the keys" to increasingly autonomous systems raises many complex and troubling questions. How will society respond as versatile robots and machine-learning systems displace an ever-expanding spectrum of blue- and white-collar workers? Will the benefits of this technological revolution be broadly distributed or accrue to a lucky few? How can we ensure that these systems respect our ethical principles when they make decisions at speeds and for rationales that exceed our ability to comprehend? What, if any, legal rights and responsibilities should we grant them? And should we regard them merely as sophisticated tools or as a newly emerging more »
Recent advances in computing may place us at the threshold of a unique turning point in human history. Soon we are likely to entrust management of our environment, economy, security, infrastructure, food production, healthcare, and to a large degree even our personal activities, to artificially intelligent computer systems. The prospect of "turning over the keys" to increasingly autonomous systems raises many complex and troubling questions. How will society respond as versatile robots and machine-learning systems displace an ever-expanding spectrum of blue- and white-collar workers? Will the benefits of this technological revolution be broadly distributed or accrue to a lucky few? How can we ensure that these systems respect our ethical principles when they make decisions at speeds and for rationales that exceed our ability to comprehend? What, if any, legal rights and responsibilities should we grant them? And should we regard them merely as sophisticated tools or as a newly emerging form of life? The goal of CS22 is to equip students with the intellectual tools, ethical foundation, and psychological framework to successfully navigate the coming age of intelligent machines. Elements used in grading: TBA. Cross-listed with Computer Science ( CS 22A) and International Policy ( INTLPOL 200).
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: Kaplan, J. (PI)

LAW 6005: Technological, Economic and Business Forces Transforming the Private Practice of Law

(Formerly Law 388) The private practice of law is undergoing fundamental change. Technological, economic and business forces are placing extreme pressure on the traditional "Big Law" firm model. These forces will transform, eliminate or replace virtually every aspect of the legal services provided by traditional firms. Foundations of the law firm model such as bespoke client services, "billable" hours, large staffs (e.g., paralegals and secretaries), high associate-to-partner ratios and summer associate programs are becoming (or have already become) relics of a bygone era. Sophisticated clients today are utilizing a wide range of internal and external service providers and technologies such as artificial intelligence for their legal work. The diversity of how legal services are delivered and priced to clients is rapidly increasing. This rapid increase is dramatically altering the supply and demand side of the legal economy and is altering the types of skills and prerequisites required more »
(Formerly Law 388) The private practice of law is undergoing fundamental change. Technological, economic and business forces are placing extreme pressure on the traditional "Big Law" firm model. These forces will transform, eliminate or replace virtually every aspect of the legal services provided by traditional firms. Foundations of the law firm model such as bespoke client services, "billable" hours, large staffs (e.g., paralegals and secretaries), high associate-to-partner ratios and summer associate programs are becoming (or have already become) relics of a bygone era. Sophisticated clients today are utilizing a wide range of internal and external service providers and technologies such as artificial intelligence for their legal work. The diversity of how legal services are delivered and priced to clients is rapidly increasing. This rapid increase is dramatically altering the supply and demand side of the legal economy and is altering the types of skills and prerequisites required for attorneys to be successful private practice. The course is composed of two parts. In part one, the technological, economic and business practices transforming the legal profession are identified and their impact on the traditional approaches to private practice law firms will be examined. In part two, the course focuses on how individual lawyers can adapt to or embrace the forces transforming law to improve their practice and succeed in the new environment. Part two of the course will additionally focus on how specific skills such as project management, social networking and information management will be crucial to a successful legal career. Part two of the course will also discuss how the changing legal environment creates new ethical and professional challenges for attorneys. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation and a research paper for the written assignment.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: Yoon, J. (PI)

LAW 6015: Innovations in the Delivery of Legal Services

This is an era of groundbreaking change in the legal profession. Twenty years ago, email was unheard of at most law firms. Today, artificial intelligence, machine learning, and online services are creating a fundamental shift in how law is practiced. Beyond technology, massive challenges to the code of professional responsibility, from multi-disciplinary practices to law firms filing for IPOs, are reshaping the legal landscape. This course focuses on the opportunities and challenges these disruptions create for the new lawyer. Students will gain hands-on experience with some of the most innovative organizations in the legal community. Significant time will also be spent analyzing changes anticipated to impact the legal industry in the next decade. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Final Paper.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 7020: Ethics On the Edge: Business, Non-Profit Organizations, Government, and Individuals

(Formerly Law 724) The objective of the course is to explore the increasing ethical challenges in a world in which technology, global risks, and societal developments are accelerating faster than our understanding can keep pace. We will unravel the factors contributing to the seemingly pervasive failure of ethics today among organizations and leaders across all sectors: business, government and non-profit. A framework for ethical decision-making underpins the course. The relationship between ethics and culture, global risks (poverty, cyber-terrorism, climate change, etc.) leadership, law and policy will inform discussion. Prominent guest speakers will attend certain sessions interactively. A broad range of international case studies might include: the Rohingya crisis in Myanmar; civilian space travel (Elon Musk's Mars plans); designer genetics; social media ethics (e.g. Facebook and Russia and on-line sex trafficking); free speech on University campuses (and Gawker type cases); artifi more »
(Formerly Law 724) The objective of the course is to explore the increasing ethical challenges in a world in which technology, global risks, and societal developments are accelerating faster than our understanding can keep pace. We will unravel the factors contributing to the seemingly pervasive failure of ethics today among organizations and leaders across all sectors: business, government and non-profit. A framework for ethical decision-making underpins the course. The relationship between ethics and culture, global risks (poverty, cyber-terrorism, climate change, etc.) leadership, law and policy will inform discussion. Prominent guest speakers will attend certain sessions interactively. A broad range of international case studies might include: the Rohingya crisis in Myanmar; civilian space travel (Elon Musk's Mars plans); designer genetics; social media ethics (e.g. Facebook and Russia and on-line sex trafficking); free speech on University campuses (and Gawker type cases); artificial intelligence; Brexit; corporate and financial sector scandals (Epi pen pricing, hedge funds, Wells Fargo, Volkswagen emissions testing manipulation); and non-profit sector ethics challenges (e.g. should NGOs engage with ISIS). Final project in lieu of exam on a topic of student's choice. Attendance required. Class participation important (with multiple opportunities to earn participation credit beyond speaking in class). Strong emphasis on rigorous analysis, critical thinking and testing ideas in real-world contexts. Students wishing to take the course who are unable to sign up within the enrollment limit should contact Kylie De La O-Ménard at kyliedm@stanford.edu. The course is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates will not be at a disadvantage. Everyone will be challenged. Distinguished Career Institute Fellows are welcome and should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud directly at susanl1@stanford.edu. NOTE: This course does not meet the SLS Ethics requirement. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments, and Final Paper. Cross-listed with Ethics in Society ( ETHICSOC 234R), Public Policy ( PUBLPOL 134, PUBLPOL 234).
Terms: Spr, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

ME 268: Robotics, AI and Design of Future Education

The seminar will feature guest lectures from industry and academia to discuss the state of the affairs in the field of Robotics, Artificial Intelligence (AI), and how that will impact the future Education. The time of robotics/AI are upon us. Within the next 10 to 20 years, many jobs will be replaced by robots/AI. We will cover hot topics in Robotics, AI, how we prepare students for the rise of Robotics/AI, how we Re-design and Re-invent our education to adapt to the new era
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Jiang, L. (PI)

MED 285: Global Leaders and Innovators in Human and Planetary Health

Are you interested in innovative ideas and strategies for addressing urgent challenges in human and planetary health? This invited lecture series, co-convened by faculty, fellows and students collaborating across several Stanford centers, invites the discussion of global problems, perspectives, and solutions in this fast-changing, vital domain. Guest faculty are leaders, innovators, and experts selected from organizations in diverse sectors such as: healthcare/medical innovation, foundations/venture capital, biotechnology/pharmaceuticals, social innovation/entrepreneurship health, tech/media and artificial intelligence (AI), human rights, global poverty/development, sustainable agriculture/hunger/nutrition. Registration open to all Stanford students and fellows. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MS&E 177: Creativity Rules

Highly experiential course focuses on factors that stimulate creativity and innovation in individuals, teams, and organizations. Workshops, case studies, and team projects, supported by guest speakers and readings. Autumn quarter will focus on "inventing the future," including tools for predicting the impact of frontier technologies, such as virtual reality, drones, genomics, artificial intelligence, and autonomous vehicles. Spring quarter will focus on tackling a real-world problem. In both quarters, students will learn how to frame and re-frame problems, challenge assumptions, work on creative teams, and generate innovative ideas. Limited enrollment. Admission by application: dschool.stanford.edu/classes.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MS&E 238: Leading Trends in Information Technology

Focuses on new trends and disruptive technologies in IT. Emphasis on the way technologies create a competitive edge and generate business value. Broad range of views presented by guest speakers, including top level executives of technology companies, and IT executives (e.g. CIOs) of Fortune 1000 companies. Special emphasis in technologies such as Cloud Computing, Artificial Intelligence, Security, Mobility, and Big Data.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Summer 2018 | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MS&E 238A: Leading Trends in Information Technology

Focuses on new trends and disruptive technologies in IT. Emphasis on the way technologies create a competitive edge and generate business value. Broad range of views presented by guest speakers, including top level executives of technology companies, and IT executives (e.g. CIOs) of Fortune 1000 companies. Special emphasis in technologies such as Cloud Computing, Artificial Intelligence, Security, Mobility, and Big Data.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Summer 2018 | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

OIT 249: MSx: Data and Decisions

Data and Decisions teaches you how to use data and quantitative reasoning to make sound decisions in complex and uncertain environments. The course draws on probability, statistics, and decision theory. Probabilities provide a foundation for understanding uncertainties, such as the risks faced by investors, insurers, and capacity planners. We will discuss the mechanics of probability (manipulating some probabilities to get others) and how to use probabilities to make decisions about uncertain events. Statistics allows managers to use small amounts of information to answer big questions. For example, statistics can help predict whether a new product will succeed or what revenue will be next quarter. The third topic, decision analysis, uses probability and statistics to plan actions, such as whether to test a new drug, buy an option, or explore for oil. In addition to improving your quantitative reasoning skills, this class seeks to prepare you for later classes that draw on this material, including finance, economics, marketing, and operations. At the end we will discuss how this material relates to machine learning and artificial intelligence.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
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