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31 - 40 of 79 results for: artificial intelligence

ENGLISH 13Q: Imaginative Realms

This class looks at the tradition of the imagined universe in fiction and poetry. Special topics include magical realism, artificial intelligence, and dystopias. Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. For undergrads only.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ENGLISH 106: A.I.: Artificial Intelligence in Fiction (AMSTUD 106A)

From self-driving cars to bots that alter democratic elections, artificial intelligence is growing increasingly powerful and prevalent in our everyday lives. Literature has long been speculating about the techno-utopia¿and catastrophe¿that A.I. could usher in. Indeed, literature itself presents us with a kind of A.I. in the many characters that speak and think in its pages. But how do we classify an intelligence as ¿artificial¿ or not? Is there a clear boundary that demarcates bodies from machines? What, if anything, separates the ¿genre¿ of technology from that of literature? What classifies literature as ¿science fiction,¿ ¿scientific,¿ ¿futuristic,¿ ¿psychological,¿ or ¿dystopian¿? And can technology or literature ever overcome the ultimate division between all intelligences¿the problem of other minds? This course consists in curated multi-genre combinations of literature, philosophy, film, and television that explore what makes someone¿or something¿a person in our world today. Special events will include celebrating the current bicentennial of Mary Shelley¿s Frankenstein (1818) in Stanford Special Collections; a possible visit to Stanford¿s A.I. Laboratory; and chatting with the ELIZA chatbot.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

ENGLISH 131C: A.I.: Artificial Intelligence in Fiction

From self-driving cars to bots that alter democratic elections, artificial intelligence is growing increasingly powerful and prevalent in our everyday lives. Fiction has long been speculating about the techno-utopia¿and catastrophe¿that A.I. could usher in. Indeed, fiction itself presents us with a kind of A.I. in the many characters that speak and think in its pages. So what constitutes an ¿intelligence¿ within literature or technology? In either field, is it ever possible to overcome the problem of other minds? Is there an ultimate boundary that demarcates bodies from machines? This course will begin with Mary Shelley¿s Frankenstein (1818) and Edgar Allan Poe¿s ¿Maelzel¿s Chess Player¿ (1836), then proceed through works such as Samuel Butler¿s Erewhon (1872), Isaac Asimov¿s I, Robot (1950), Stanley Kubrick¿s 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), and Stanford lecturer Scott Hutchins¿s A Working Theory of Love (2012), including a possible visit from Hutchins. Throughout, we will be asking ourselves what makes someone¿or something¿a person in our world today.
Last offered: Summer 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ETHICSOC 182: Ethics, Public Policy, and Technological Change (COMM 180, CS 182, PHIL 82, POLISCI 182, PUBLPOL 182)

Examination of recent developments in computing technology and platforms through the lenses of philosophy, public policy, social science, and engineering. Course is organized around four main units: algorithmic decision-making and bias; data privacy and civil liberties; artificial intelligence and autonomous systems; and the power of private computing platforms. Each unit considers the promise, perils, rights, and responsibilities at play in technological developments. Prerequisite: CS106A.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

ETHICSOC 185M: Contemporary Moral Problems (PHIL 72, POLISCI 134P)

This course is an introduction to contemporary ethical thought with a focus on the morality of harming others and saving others from harm. It aims to develop students' ability to think carefully and rationally about moral issues, to acquaint them with modern moral theory, and to encourage them to develop their own considered positions about important real-world issues. In the first part of the course, we will explore fundamental topics in the ethics of harm. Among other questions, we will ask: How extensive are one's moral duties to improve the lives of the less fortunate? When is it permissible to inflict harm on others for the sake of the greater good? Does the moral permissibility of a person's action depend on her intentions? Can a person be harmed by being brought into existence? In the second part of the course, we will turn to practical questions. Some of these will be familiar; for example: Is abortion morally permissible? What obligations do we have to protect the planet for t more »
This course is an introduction to contemporary ethical thought with a focus on the morality of harming others and saving others from harm. It aims to develop students' ability to think carefully and rationally about moral issues, to acquaint them with modern moral theory, and to encourage them to develop their own considered positions about important real-world issues. In the first part of the course, we will explore fundamental topics in the ethics of harm. Among other questions, we will ask: How extensive are one's moral duties to improve the lives of the less fortunate? When is it permissible to inflict harm on others for the sake of the greater good? Does the moral permissibility of a person's action depend on her intentions? Can a person be harmed by being brought into existence? In the second part of the course, we will turn to practical questions. Some of these will be familiar; for example: Is abortion morally permissible? What obligations do we have to protect the planet for the sake of future generations? Other questions we will ask are newer and less well-trodden. These will include: How does the availability of new technology, in particular artificial intelligence, change the moral landscape of the ethics of war? What moral principles should govern the programming and operation of autonomous vehicles?
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER

GSBGEN 503: The Business of Healthcare

Healthcare spending is now nearly 18% of the entire GDP of the U.S. economy. The S&P healthcare sector has been one of the best producing segments of the market for the last five years, and growth of healthcare expenditures continue to escalate at a rapid pace. This has triggered an abundance of opportunities for those interested in a career in healthcare management, investing, or entrepreneurialism. The Business of Healthcare-2017-18 will present the current market framework from the eyes of a clinician and with the perspective of the consumer-patient, but with the experience of a successful business builder and investor. Course will begin with the discussion of the channels of distribution of healthcare delivery, from providers, to practitioners, to consumer-facing ¿healthcare lite¿ sectors of the market. Impact of the regulatory environment, with specific focus on the Affordable Care Act and the impending plans to Repeal/Replace, will be evaluated. High-level exploration of internat more »
Healthcare spending is now nearly 18% of the entire GDP of the U.S. economy. The S&P healthcare sector has been one of the best producing segments of the market for the last five years, and growth of healthcare expenditures continue to escalate at a rapid pace. This has triggered an abundance of opportunities for those interested in a career in healthcare management, investing, or entrepreneurialism. The Business of Healthcare-2017-18 will present the current market framework from the eyes of a clinician and with the perspective of the consumer-patient, but with the experience of a successful business builder and investor. Course will begin with the discussion of the channels of distribution of healthcare delivery, from providers, to practitioners, to consumer-facing ¿healthcare lite¿ sectors of the market. Impact of the regulatory environment, with specific focus on the Affordable Care Act and the impending plans to Repeal/Replace, will be evaluated. High-level exploration of international health care markets and how they compare to the American market will be included. Overview of venture and private equity investing will be deeply probed, with many specific market examples of how investors develop an investment thesis, identify specific targets, diligence companies, and close an investment. Discussion around building financial modeling for target acquisitions will be presented, and the course will delve into the burgeoning area of healthcare analytics and outcomes management, including Artificial Intelligence, and its future impact on positioning, reimbursement and clinical outcomes. Sectors that will be discussed include: Healthcare services, Healthcare IT, Life Sciences, Pharma and Biotechnology, and Managed Care. The topic of the emerging importance of consumerism will be probed and consumer-directed healthcare related products and services will be explored, e.g. nutraceuticals, wellness, fitness, etc. Course will include preparatory readings, presentations from successful and powerful industry leaders, and robust in-class discussion and case studies requiring student engagement. Final grade will consist of class participation, one minor in-class presentation, and a final paper developing either a new healthcare business start-up proposition or presenting an identified investment target in the healthcare industry. Course will be especially valuable for those interested in a career in starting a healthcare company, healthcare investing, healthcare administration, or other healthcare-related management and goal of class will be provide an in-depth overview of how to get started or advance a professional interest in the industry.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Krubert, C. (PI)

GSBGEN 596: Designing AI to Cultivate Human Well-Being

Overview: This is a multi-disciplinary cross-listed course focused on the goal of helping to build AI technology that promotes human flourishing. This course aims to expose (a) GSB students to deep learning and AI techniques focused on human well-being, and (b) CS students to behavioral science and design thinking, as well as frameworks and research to better understand human well-being and human-centered designs. Students will form cross-disciplinary teams and work on a final project that delves into an industry and proposes a detailed 5-year road map on how that industry might evolve with AI algorithms that focused on human well-being. Course Description: The past decade of machine learning has given us self-driving cars, practical speech recognition, video game playing robots, effective web search, and revolutionary drug treatments. While Artificial Intelligence has been impressive in achieving these specific tasks, this does not always correspond to the broader goal of cultivating more »
Overview: This is a multi-disciplinary cross-listed course focused on the goal of helping to build AI technology that promotes human flourishing. This course aims to expose (a) GSB students to deep learning and AI techniques focused on human well-being, and (b) CS students to behavioral science and design thinking, as well as frameworks and research to better understand human well-being and human-centered designs. Students will form cross-disciplinary teams and work on a final project that delves into an industry and proposes a detailed 5-year road map on how that industry might evolve with AI algorithms that focused on human well-being. Course Description: The past decade of machine learning has given us self-driving cars, practical speech recognition, video game playing robots, effective web search, and revolutionary drug treatments. While Artificial Intelligence has been impressive in achieving these specific tasks, this does not always correspond to the broader goal of cultivating human well-being. The goal of this class is to bridge the gap between technology and societal objectives: How do we design AI to promote human flourishing? On Day 1, we draw on behavioral research to discuss what makes humans thrive. Behavioral research shows that for people to flourish, they need meaning, which involves an ability to understand and value others, a sense of belonging, and knowledge that they are making a contribution bigger than themselves. The conditions for this occur when people feel they have the resources and insight to establish a sense of meaning for themselves. Students will draw on this research to focus on building AI technology that effectively understands, communicates with, collaborates with and augment people. On days 2-5, leaders across industries (e.g., healthcare, transportation) that fundamentally affect human wellbeing will participate in lightning round exchanges to delve deeply into the challenge of building technology focused on human well-being, followed by interactive discussion with students. On the last day, the four-person cross-disciplinary teams will present their 2 page white paper proposals to invited guests. Of note: this course is entirely about high-level "programming" and provides no technical insight on machine learning, data-mining or statistical pattern recognition.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

HRMGT 203: People Analytics

How can we use big data, machine learning and artificial intelligence to inform design, hiring, promotion and human resource management processes in organizations? We will discuss the theoretical and practical challenges that these issues present, and the ways by which data can help resolve them. In doing so, we will explore various data analytic methods and different data types, as well as the pitfalls and ethical issues their use introduces.
Last offered: Spring 2019

HRP 285: Global Leaders and Innovators in Human and Planetary Health (MED 285)

Are you interested in innovative ideas and strategies for addressing urgent challenges in human and planetary health? This lecture series features a selection of noteworthy leaders, innovators and experts across diverse sectors such as: healthcare/medical innovation, foundations/venture capital, biotechnology/pharmaceuticals, social innovation/entrepreneurship health, tech/media and artificial intelligence (AI), human rights, global poverty/development, sustainable agriculture/hunger/nutrition. Co-convened by faculty, fellows and students collaborating across several Stanford centers, the course invites the discussion of global problems, perspectives and solutions in the fields of health and the environment. Light Dinner will be served. Students from all backgrounds are encouraged to enroll - registration open to all Stanford students and fellows. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2

HUMBIO 96SI: Big problems, big solutions? tackling difficult issues in today's healthcare system.

It is impossible to innovate in healthcare without first understanding the context in which these innovations take place. The course aims to allow students an intimate setting to debate issues that plague healthcare today, and work with guest speakers (from Stanford Medicine, Stanford Biodesign, RockHealth to Apple Health and more!) to gain insight into what's actually being done about it. Some controversial topics highlighted include: Healthcare Legislation (especially in the context of the last tow administrations), Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare, Gene Therapy, and in-depth analysis of Failed Medical Devices and Innovations.
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