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1 - 10 of 76 results for: artificial intelligence

AMSTUD 106A: A.I.: Artificial Intelligence in Fiction (ENGLISH 106)

From self-driving cars to bots that alter democratic elections, artificial intelligence is growing increasingly powerful and prevalent in our everyday lives. Literature has long been speculating about the techno-utopia¿and catastrophe¿that A.I. could usher in. Indeed, literature itself presents us with a kind of A.I. in the many characters that speak and think in its pages. But how do we classify an intelligence as ¿artificial¿ or not? Is there a clear boundary that demarcates bodies from machines? What, if anything, separates the ¿genre¿ of technology from that of literature? What classifies literature as ¿science fiction,¿ ¿scientific,¿ ¿futuristic,¿ ¿psychological,¿ or ¿dystopian¿? And can technology or literature ever overcome the ultimate division between all intelligences¿the problem of other minds? This course consists in curated multi-genre combinations of literature, philosophy, film, and television that explore what makes someone¿or something¿a person in our world today. Special events will include celebrating the current bicentennial of Mary Shelley¿s Frankenstein (1818) in Stanford Special Collections; a possible visit to Stanford¿s A.I. Laboratory; and chatting with the ELIZA chatbot.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2018 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AMSTUD 120: The Rise of Digital Culture (COMM 120W, COMM 220)

From Snapchat to artificial intelligence, digital systems are reshaping our jobs, our democracies, our love lives, and even what it means to be human. But where did these media come from? And what kind of culture are they creating? To answer these questions, this course explores the entwined development of digital technologies and post-industrial ways of living and working from the Cold War to the present. Topics will include the historical origins of digital media, cultural contexts of their deployment and use, and the influence of digital media on conceptions of self, community, and state. Priority to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANES 208A: Data Science for Digital Health and Precision Medicine

How will digital health, low-cost patient-generated and genomic data enable precision medicine to transform health care? This Everyone Included¿ course from Stanford Medicine X and SHC Clinical Inference will provide an overview of data science principles and showcase real world solutions being created to advance precision medicine through implementation of digital health tools, machine learning and artificial intelligence approaches. This class will feature thought leaders and luminaries who are patients, technologists, providers, researchers and leading innovators from academia and industry. This course is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Lunch will be provided.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2018 | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

ANTHRO 128A: The Boundaries of Humanity: Humans, Animals and Machines in the Age of Biotechnology

Advances in research and technology are blurring the boundaries between humans, animals, and machines, challenging conventional notions of human nature. Seminar explores the question of what it now means to be human and the personal, social, and ethical implications of our advancing technologies through the lens of various disciplines, including anthropology, cognitive psychology, neuroscience, genetics, evolutionary biology, biotechnology, and artificial intelligence. Includes guest speakers from fields and industries where important questions are being raised.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2016 | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 175: Collective Behavior and Distributed Intelligence (SYMSYS 275)

This course will explore possibilities for student research projects based on presentations of faculty research. We will cover a broad range of topics within the general area of collective behavior, both natural and artificial. Students will build on faculty presentations to develop proposals for future projects.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIODS 220: Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

Healthcare is one of the most exciting application domains of artificial intelligence, with transformative potential in areas ranging from medical image analysis to electronic health records-based prediction and precision medicine. This course will involve a deep dive into recent advances in AI in healthcare, focusing in particular on deep learning approaches for healthcare problems. We will start from foundations of neural networks, and then study cutting-edge deep learning models in the context of a variety of healthcare data including image, text, multimodal and time-series data. In the latter part of the course, we will cover advanced topics on open challenges of integrating AI in a societal application such as healthcare, including interpretability, robustness, privacy and fairness. The course aims to provide students from diverse backgrounds with both conceptual understanding and practical grounding of cutting-edge research on AI in healthcare.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CEE 329: Artificial Intelligence Applications in the AEC Industry

Through weekly lectures given by prominent researchers, practicing professionals, and entrepreneurs, this class will examine important industry problems and critically assess corresponding AI directions in both academia and industry. Students will gain an understanding of how AI can be used to provide solutions in the architecture, engineering, and construction industry and asses the technology, feasibility, and corresponding implementation effort. Students are expected to participate actively in the lectures and discussions, submit triweekly reflection writings, and present their own evaluation of existing solutions. Enrollment limited to 12 students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Fischer, M. (PI)

CEE 329S: Seminar on Artificial Intelligence Applications in the AEC Industry

Through weekly lectures given by prominent researchers, practicing professionals, and entrepreneurs, this class will examine important industry problems and critically assess corresponding AI directions in both academia and industry. Students will gain an understanding of how AI can be used to provide solutions in the architecture, engineering, and construction industry and asses the technology, feasibility, and corresponding implementation effort. Students are expected to actively prepare for and participate in all lectures and corresponding discussions.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2019 | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 100S: Introduction to Digital Labor

Digital technologies have had a profound influence on our economy, the ways we communicate, and the ways in which we work. This course will provide a lens through which to understand digital labor and digital work today. We will explore the ideological and cultural values of Silicon Valley and their role in shaping the new business models of the Internet Age (such as crowdsourcing, the sharing economy, and humans-as-a-service). We will examine the past, present, and future of mechanisms of workplace control (from clocks to algorithmic management) and the implications of the digital turn on spatial and material dimensions of labor. Finally, we will turn our attention toward possible futures of work, given the increasing presence of automation and artificial intelligence in the workplace. By engaging with social scientific analyses and popular media, students will leave the course with a greater appreciation of worker perspectives and challenges in the digital era.
Terms: Sum, last offered Summer 2019 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 120W: The Rise of Digital Culture (AMSTUD 120, COMM 220)

From Snapchat to artificial intelligence, digital systems are reshaping our jobs, our democracies, our love lives, and even what it means to be human. But where did these media come from? And what kind of culture are they creating? To answer these questions, this course explores the entwined development of digital technologies and post-industrial ways of living and working from the Cold War to the present. Topics will include the historical origins of digital media, cultural contexts of their deployment and use, and the influence of digital media on conceptions of self, community, and state. Priority to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Turner, F. (PI)
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