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561 - 570 of 736 results for: all courses

MUSIC 146K: Studies in Ethnomusicology: Music of South Asia (MUSIC 246K)

Focuses on the history, theory, and practice of South Asian music with particular emphasis on the classical traditions of North and South India. Also addresses regional folk, popular, and devotional musical styles of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Topics include: raga, tala, vocal and instrumental genres, improvisation, aesthetics, music transmission, musical nationalism, social organization of musicians, music and ritual, music and gender, and technology. Lecture with discussion, some singing (no experience necessary), guest performances, reading, listening, and analysis. Pre-/corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 or 5 units only.)
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

MUSIC 146L: Studies in Ethnomusicology: Musics of Africa and the African Diaspora (AFRICAAM 146L, AFRICAST 246L, MUSIC 246L)

An introduction to musics of Africa and the African Diaspora. Topics include: music and nationalism, religion, embodiment, diaspora, migration, resistance, gender, globalization, and race. Musical regions and nations may include: Zimbabwe, South Africa, West Africa, Central Africa, Somalia, Ethiopia, the Caribbean, and the United States. This is a seminar-based course in which students will write short reflective papers and a final, research-based paper.Pre- or co-requisite for WIM credit: Music 22. WIM at 4 or 5 letter-graded units only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

MUSIC 147J: Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: The Soul Tradition in African American Music (AFRICAAM 19, AMSTUD 147J, CSRE 147J, MUSIC 247J)

The African American tradition of soul music from its origins in blues, gospel, and jazz to its influence on today's r&b, hip hop, and dance music. Style such as rhythm and blues, Motown, Southern soul, funk, Philadelphia soul, disco, Chicago house, Detroit techno, trip hop, and neo-soul. Soul's cultural influence and global reach; its interaction with politics, gender, place, technology, and the economy. Pre-/corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

MUSIC 147K: Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: Music and Urban Film (MUSIC 247K)

How music and sound work in urban cinema. What happens when music's capacity to transform everyday reality combines with the realism of urban films? Provides an introduction to traditional theories of film music and film sound; considers how new technologies and practices have changed the roles of music in film. Readings discuss film music, realistic cinema, urban musical practices and urban culture. Viewing includes action/adventure, Hindi film, documentary, film noir, hip hop film, the musical, and borderline cases by Jean-Luc Godard, Spike Lee, Wong Kar-Wai and Tsai Ming-Liang. Pre- or corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 unit level only.)
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

MUSIC 147L: Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: Latin American Music and Globalization (CHILATST 147L, CSRE 147L, MUSIC 247L)

Focuses on vernacular music of Latin America and the Caribbean, including Mexico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Peru, Brazil, Colombia, and Argentina. Musical examples discussed in relation to: globalization, migration, colonialism, nationalism, diaspora, indigeneity, politics, religion, dance, ethnicity, and gender. How music reflects and shapes cultures, identities, and social structures. Genres addressed: bachata, bossa nova, cumbia, forro, ranchero, reggaeton, rock, salsa, tango, and others. Seminar, guest performances, reading, listening, and analysis. Pre-/corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 187: Music and Culture from the Land of Fire: Introduction to Azerbaijani Mugham

Nestled in the Caucasus, Azerbaijan is a crossroads between East and West; its rich musical heritage contains threads of Turkish, Central Asian, Persian, Caucasian, Russian, and Arabic traditions. In this course, master-musician Imamyar Hasanov teaches students to perform and appreciate Azeri music. Content includes classical mugham, Eastern theory, improvisation and microtonality. We¿ll discuss Azeri music culture, supplemented by guest lecturers and Skype¿ interviews with musicians in Azerbaijan. Open to students with any experience playing a musical instrument (including voice). No previous experience with Azeri music necessary. Supported by the SF World Music Festival.Questions? Email schultza@stanford.edu.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED

NATIVEAM 16: Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America (ANTHRO 16, ANTHRO 116C, ARCHLGY 16)

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

NATIVEAM 64Q: These languages were here first: A look at the indigenous languages of California (ANTHRO 64Q, LINGUIST 64Q)

Stanford was built on land originally inhabited by the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, and Native American students have always held an important place in the university community from the writer and journalist John Milton Oskison (Cherokee) who graduated in 1894 to current enrolments of over three hundred students who represent over fifty tribes. Two hundred years ago, the Muwekma language was one of a hundred languages that made California one of the most linguistically-diverse places on earth. Today, less than half of these languages survive but many California Indian communities are working hard to maintain and revitalize them. This is a familiar pattern globally: languages around the world are dying at such a rapid rate that the next century could see half of the world's 6800 languages and cultures become extinct unless action is taken now. Focusing especially on California, this course seeks to find out how and why languages die; what is lost from a culture when that occurs; and how `sleeping¿ languages might be revitalized. We will take a field trip to a Native American community in northern California to witness first-hand how one community is bringing back its traditional language, songs, dances, and story-telling. We will learn from visiting indigenous leaders and linguistic experts who will share their life, language, and culture with the class. Through weekly readings and discussion, we will investigate how languages can be maintained and revitalized by methods of community- and identity-building, language documentation and description, the use of innovative technologies, writing dictionaries and grammars for different audiences, language planning, and data creation, annotation, preservation, and dissemination. Finally, the course will examine ethical modes of fieldwork within endangered-language communities.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

NATIVEAM 103S: Gender in Native American Societies (CSRE 103S, FEMGEN 103S)

Seminar examines the impact of colonialism on gender roles & gender relations in American Indian communities beginning with the 17th century to the present. Topics include demographic changes; social, political & economic transformations associated with biological & spiritual assaults; the dynamism & diversity of native societies. Sources include history, ethnography, biography, autobiography, the novel & film.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED
Instructors: Anderson, J. (PI)

NATIVEAM 115: Introduction to Native American History

This course incorporates a Native American perspective in the assigned readings and is an introduction to Native American History from contact with Europeans to the present. History, from a Western perspective, is secular and objectively evaluative whereas for most Indigenous peoples, history is a moral endeavor (Walker, Lakota Society 113). A focus in the course is the civil rights era in American history when Native American protest movements were active. Colonization and decolonization, as they historically occurred are an emphasis throughout the course using texts written from the perspective of the colonized at the end of the 20th century in addition to the main text. Students will be encouraged to critically explore issues of interest through two short papers and one longer paper that is summarized in a 15-20 minute presentation on a topic of interest relating to the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED
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