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111 - 120 of 887 results for: all courses

ARTHIST 262: Office of Metropolitan Architecture: Workshop of the New (CEE 132Q)

This seminar investigates all aspects of the work of the Office of Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) and its leader Rem Koolhaas. Topics for class research and inquiry include but are not be limited to: Koolhaas's early work at the Architectural Association and the founding of OMA, the publications of OMA and their style of presentation and theoretical foundations, the importance of AMO, and the architects who have left OMA and founded their own practices and how these differ from OMA. Each student completes an in-depth research paper and an in-class presentation.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 264A: Picturing the Cosmos

This seminar explores the place of images in how we understand and imagine the universe. The course draws on art, science, and popular culture, and pays particular attention to the ways they inform each other. Examples include: star maps, science fiction films, appropriated astronomical images, and telescopic views of stars, planets, and nebulae. Using these representations as well as accompanying readings we will discuss the importance of aesthetics for conceptions of the cosmos; the influence of technology on representations; strategies for representing concepts that exceed the limits of human vision; and the ways that views of the universe reflect and shape their cultural context. Open to undergraduates and graduates.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 287: Pictures of the Floating World: Images from Japanese Popular Culture (ARTHIST 487X, JAPANLIT 287)

Printed objects produced during the Edo period (1600-1868), including the Ukiyo-e (pictures of the floating world) and lesser-studied genres such as printed books (ehon) and popular broadsheets (kawaraban). How a society constructs itself through images. The borders of the acceptable and censorship; theatricality, spectacle, and slippage; the construction of play, set in conflict against the dominant neo-Confucian ideology of fixed social roles.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Takeuchi, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 288B: The Enduring Passion for Ink: Contemporary Chinese Ink Painting

Contemporary Chinese ink painters are exploring new ground. They push the limits of the medium, creating installations and performances, mixing ink with other media, and advancing age-tested brushstrokes and compositions. The recent flurry of exhibitions attests to contemporary ink painting¿s increasing importance. nnThis seminar introduces major figures (Xu Bing, Liu Dan, Zheng Chongbin, Li Huasheng, etc.) and movements in contemporary Chinese ink art. Emphasis is placed on improving writing abilities and on in-class reports and discussion. Topics for discussion include readings, individual works of art, and broad issues in contemporary art. Prerequisite: courses in Art History and/or Studio Art OR permission of instructor. open to undergraduates and graduates.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 296: Junior Seminar: Methods & Historiography of Art History

Historiography and methodology. Through a series of case studies, this course introduces a range of influential critical perspectives in art history as a discipline and a practice. The goal is to stimulate thinking about what it means to explore the history of art today, to expose and examine our assumptions, expectations and predilections as we undertake to learn and write about works of art, their meanings and their status in the world.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Meyer, R. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 131: Sound Art I (MUSIC 154A)

Acoustic, digital and analog approaches to sound art. Familiarization with techniques of listening, recording, digital processing and production. Required listening and readings in the history and contemporary practice of sound art. (lower level)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ASNAMST 17Q: Perspectives in North American Taiko (MUSIC 17Q)

Preference to sophomores. Taiko, or Japanese drum, is a newcomer to the American music scene. Emergence of the first N. American taiko groups coincided with increased Japanese American activism, and to some it is symbolic of Japanese American identity. N. American taiko is associated with Japanese American Buddhism. Musical, cultural, historical, and political perspectives of taiko. Hands-on drumming. Japanese music and Japanese American history, and relations among performance, cultural expression, community, and identity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ASNAMST 146S: Asian American Culture and Community (AMSTUD 146, COMPLIT 146, CSRE 146S)

This course introduces students to the histories of Asians in America, specifically as these histories are part of a broader Asia-US-Pacific history that characterized the 20th century and now the 21st. We will combine readings in history, literature, sociology, with community-based learning.nnThe course takes place over two quarters. The first quarter focuses on gaining knowledge of Asian America and discussion key topics that students wish to focus on collaboratively. During this first quarter we also learn about community-based learning, set up teams and projects, and develop relationships with community organizations. The second quarter students work with student liaisons (senior students who have experience in service learning) and complete their work with the community¿there are no formal class meetings this second quarter. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Course can be repeated once.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 32B: Design Theory

This seminar focuses on the key themes, histories, and methods of architectural theory -- a form of architectural practice that establishes the aims and philosophies of architecture. Architectural theory is primarily written, but it also incorporates drawing, photography, film, and other media. nnOne of the distinctive features of modern and contemporary architecture is its pronounced use of theory to articulate its aims. One might argue that modern architecture is modern because of its incorporation of theory. This course focuses on those early-modern, modern, and late-modern writings that have been and remain entangled with contemporary architectural thought and design practice. nnRather than examine the development of modern architectural theory chronologically, it is explored architectural through thematic topics. These themes enable the student to understand how certain architectural theoretical concepts endure, are transformed, and can be furthered through his/her own explorations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Beischer, T. (PI)

CEE 32G: Architecture Since 1900 (ARTHIST 142)

Art 142 is an introduction to the history of architecture since 1900 and how it has shaped and been shaped by its cultural contexts. The class also investigates the essential relationship between built form and theory during this period.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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