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41 - 50 of 177 results for: all courses

BIOHOPK 43: Plant Biology, Evolution, and Ecology

Introduction to biology in a marine context. Principles of plant biology: physiology, structure, diversity. Principles of evolution: macro and microevolution, population genetics. Ecology: the principles governing the distribution and abundance of organisms; population, community, and ecosystem ecology. Equivalent to BIO 43. Corequisite: BIOHOPK 47.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 47: Introduction to Research in Ecology and Ecological Physiology

This course is a field-based inquiry into rocky intertidal shores that introducesnstudents to ecology and environmental physiology and the research methods used to study them. Students will learn how to detect patterns quantitatively in nature through appropriate sampling methods & statistical analysis. Following exploration of appropriate background material in class and through exploration of the scientific literature, students will learn how to formulate testable hypotheses regarding the underlying causes of the patterns they discern. A variety of different aspects of ecology and physiology will be investigated cooperatively by the students during the quarter, culminating in development of an individual final paper in the form of a research proposal based on data collected during the course. The course will provide a broad conceptual introduction to the underlying biological principles that influence adaptation to the planet¿s dynamic habitats, as well as inquiry-based experience in how to explore and understand complex systems in nature. nThis course fulfills the same laboratory requirement as BIO 47. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 161H: Invertebrate Zoology (BIOHOPK 261H)

(Graduate students register for 261H.) Survey of invertebrate diversity emphasizing form and function in a phylogenetic framework. Morphological diversity, life histories, physiology, and ecology of the major invertebrate groups, concentrating on local marine forms as examples. Current views on the phylogenetic relationships and evolution of the invertebrates. Lectures, lab, plus field trips. Satisfies Central Menu Area 3 for Bio majors.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 162H: Comparative Animal Physiology (BIOHOPK 262H)

(Graduate students register for 262H.) How animals work. Topics: physiology of respiration, circulation, energy metabolism, thermal regulation, osmotic regulation, muscle physiology, and locomotion. Evolutionary and ecological physiology. Lectures, lab, and field research. An option to combine the course work with a more intensive research focus, with more units, is available. Satisfies Central Menu Area 3 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 163H: Oceanic Biology (BIOHOPK 263H)

(Graduate students register for 263H.) How the physics and chemistry of the oceanic environment affect marine plants and animals. Topics: seawater and ocean circulation, separation of light and nutrients in the two-layered ocean, oceanic food webs and trophic interactions, oceanic environments, biogeography, and global change. Lectures, discussion, and field trips. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4 for Bio majors. Recommended: PHYSICS 21 or 51, CHEM 31, or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 166H: Molecular Ecology (BIOHOPK 266H)

(Graduate students register for 266H.) How modern technologies in gene sequencing, detection of nuclear nucleotide polymorphisms, and other approaches are used to gather data on genetic variation that allow measurement of population structure, infer demographic histories, inform conservation efforts, and advance understanding of the ecology of diverse types of organisms.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2014 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 167H: Nerve, Muscle, and Synapse (BIOHOPK 267H)

(Graduate students register for 267H.) Fundamental aspects of membrane excitability, nerve conduction, synaptic transmission, and excitation-contraction coupling. Emphasis is on biophysical, molecular, and cellular level analyses of these processes in vertebrate and invertebrate systems. Labs on intra- and extracellular recording and patch clamp techniques. Lectures, discussions, and labs. Satisfies Central Menu Area 3 for Bio majors Prerequisites: PHYSICS 23, 28, 43, or equivalent; CHEM 31, calculus; or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2016 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 172H: Marine Ecology: From Organisms to Ecosystems (BIOHOPK 272H)

(Graduate students register for 272H.) This course incorporates the approaches of experimental ecology, biomechanics (ecomechanics), and physiology to develop an integrated perspective on the factors that govern the structures of marine ecosystems and how environment change, including anthropogenic influences, affects ecosystems' species composition and health. Focus is on rocky intertidal, kelp forest, estuarine, and midwater ecosystems of Monterey Bay. Experimental projects done in the field offer experience in a variety of ecological techniques and in analysis of ecological data. Students will engage in presentation and debates of current topics in marine ecology and conservation. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Fulfills WIM in Biology.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 174H: Experimental Design and Probability (BIOHOPK 274H)

(Graduate students register for 274H.) Variability is an integral part of biology. Introduction to probability and its use in addressing biological problems. Focus is on experimental design and the use of linear models in testing hypotheses (e.g., regression, analysis of variance, and general linear models). Students will use R to explore and analyze biological data from Monterey Bay. No programming or statistical background is assumed. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 182H: Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 323H, EARTHSYS 323, ESS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major.
Terms: Spr | Units: 16 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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