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21 - 30 of 177 results for: all courses

BIO 116: Ecology of the Hawaiian Islands (EARTHSYS 116)

Terrestrial and marine ecology and conservation biology of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Taught in the field in Hawaii as part of quarter-long sequence of courses including Earth Sciences and Anthropology. Topics include ecological succession, plant-soil interactions, conservation biology, biological invasions and ecosystem consequences, and coral reef ecology. Restricted to students accepted into the Earth Systems of Hawaii Program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIO 117: Biology and Global Change (EARTHSYS 111, ESS 111)

The biological causes and consequences of anthropogenic and natural changes in the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Topics: glacial cycles and marine circulation, greenhouse gases and climate change, tropical deforestation and species extinctions, and human population growth and resource use. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core or BIO 81 or graduate standing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 119: Evolution of Marine Ecosystems (EARTHSYS 122, GEOLSCI 123, GEOLSCI 223B)

Life originally evolved in the ocean. When, why, and how did the major transitions occur in the history of marine life? What triggered the rapid evolution and diversification of animals in the Cambrian, after more than 3.5 billion years of Earth's history? What caused Earth's major mass extinction events? How do ancient extinction events compare to current threats to marine ecosystems? How has the evolution of primary producers impacted animals, and how has animal evolution impacted primary producers? In this course, we will review the latest evidence regarding these major questions in the history of marine ecosystems. We will develop familiarity with the most common groups of marine animal fossils. We will also conduct original analyses of paleontological data, developing skills both in the framing and testing of scientific hypotheses and in data analysis and presentation.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 132: Advanced Imaging Lab in Biophysics (APPPHYS 232, BIO 232, BIOPHYS 232, GENE 232)

Laboratory and lectures. Advanced microscopy and imaging, emphasizing hands-on experience with state-of-the-art techniques. Students construct and operate working apparatus. Topics include microscope optics, Koehler illumination, contrast-generating mechanisms (bright/dark field, fluorescence, phase contrast, differential interference contrast), and resolution limits. Laboratory topics vary by year, but include single-molecule fluorescence, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, microendoscopy, and optical trapping. Limited enrollment. Recommended: basic physics, basic cell biology, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIO 144: Conservation Biology: A Latin American Perspective (BIO 234, HUMBIO 112)

Principles and application of the science of preserving biological diversity. Conceptually, this course is designed to explore 4 major components relevant to the conservation of biodiversity, as exemplified by the Latin American region. The conceptual frameworks and principles, however, should be generally applicable, and provide insights for all regions of the world, including those of lesser biodiversity. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: BIO 101 or BIO 43 or HUMBIO 2A or BIO 81 and 84 or consent of instructor. Graduate level students will be expected to conduct a literature research exercise leading to a written paper, addressing a topic of their choosing, derived from any of the themes discussed in class.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dirzo, R. (PI)

BIO 145: Ecology and Evolution of Animal Behavior (BIO 245)

Ecological and evolutionary perspectives on animal behavior, with an emphasis on social and collective behavior. This is a project-based course in a lecture/seminar format. Seminars will be based on discussion of journal articles. Independent research projects on the behavior of animals on campus. Prerequisites: Biology or Human Biology core or BIO 81 and 85 or consent of instructor; Biology/ES 30. Recommended: statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gordon, D. (PI)

BIO 149: The Neurobiology of Sleep (BIO 249, HUMBIO 161)

Preference to seniors and graduate students. The neurochemistry and neurophysiology of changes in brain activity and conscious awareness associated with changes in the sleep/wake state. Behavioral and neurobiological phenomena including sleep regulation, sleep homeostasis, circadian rhythms, sleep disorders, sleep function, and the molecular biology of sleep. Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: Win, alternate years, not given next year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 150: Human Behavioral Biology (HUMBIO 160)

Multidisciplinary. How to approach complex normal and abnormal behaviors through biology. How to integrate disciplines including sociobiology, ethology, neuroscience, and endocrinology to examine behaviors such as aggression, sexual behavior, language use, and mental illness.
Terms: alternate years, given next year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 151: Mechanisms of Neuron Death

For Biology majors with background in neuroscience. Cell and molecular biology of neuron death during neurological disease. Topics: the amyloid diseases (Alzheimer's), prion diseases (kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob), oxygen radical diseases (Parkinson's and ALS), triplet repeat diseases (Huntington's), and AIDS-related dementia. Student presentations. Enrollment limited to 15; application required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Sapolsky, R. (PI)

BIO 152: Imaging: Biological Light Microscopy (CSB 222, MCP 222)

This intensive laboratory and discussion course will provide participants with the theoretical and practical knowledge to utilize emerging imaging technologies based on light microscopy. Topics include microscope optics, resolution limits, Köhler illumination, confocal fluorescence, two-photon, TIRF, FRET, photobleaching, super-resolution (SIM, STED, STORM/PALM), tissue clearing/CLARITY/light-sheet microscopy, and live-cell imaging. Applications include using fluorescent probes to analyze subcellular localization and live cell-translocation dynamics. We will be using a flipped classroom for the course in that students will watch iBiology lectures before class, and class time will be used for engaging in extensive discussion. Lab portion involves extensive in-class use of microscopes in the CSIF and NMS core microscopy facilities.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
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