2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

801 - 810 of 970 results for: all courses

PUBLPOL 122: Biosecurity and Bioterrorism Response (BIOE 122, EMED 122, EMED 222, PUBLPOL 222)

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. How well the US and global healthcare systems are prepared to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and the technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism response and how they interface, the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats, global bio-surveillance, making the medical diagnosis, isolation, containment, hospital surge capacity, stockpiling and distribution of countermeasures, food and agriculture biosecurity, new promising technologies for detection of bio-threats and countermeasures. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary. 4 units for twice weekly attendance (Mon. and Wed.); additional 1 unit for writing a research paper for 5 units total maximum.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Trounce, M. (PI)

PUBLPOL 124: American Political Institutions in Uncertain Times (POLISCI 120C)

This course examines how the rules that govern elections and the policy process determine political outcomes. It explores the historical forces that have shaped American political institutions, contemporary challenges to governing, and prospects for change. Topics covered include partisan polarization and legislative gridlock, the politicization of the courts, electoral institutions and voting rights, the expansion of presidential power, campaign finance and lobbying, representational biases among elected officials, and the role of political institutions in maintaining the rule of law. Throughout, emphasis will be placed on the strategic interactions between Congress, the presidency, and the courts and the importance of informal norms and political culture. Political Science majors taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 120C.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PUBLPOL 133: Political Power in American Cities (AMSTUD 121Z, POLISCI 121, URBANST 111)

The major actors, institutions, processes, and policies of sub-state government in the U.S., emphasizing city general-purpose governments through a comparative examination of historical and contemporary politics. Issues related to federalism, representation, voting, race, poverty, housing, and finances. Political Science majors taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 121.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 136: The Sharing Economy (URBANST 136)

The rapid growth of the sharing economy, sometimes also called the peer to peer economy, is made possible by the ubiquity of smart phones, inefficiency of ownership, and measures designed to create and measure trust among participants. The course will explore not only the rapid rise of certain companies but also the shadow side of commercialized relationships. We will examine the economics and development consequences of the sharing economy, primarily with an urban focus, along an emphasis on the design of platforms and markets, ownership, the nature of work, environmental degradation and inequality.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PUBLPOL 137: Innovations in Microcredit and Development Finance (URBANST 137)

The role of innovative financial institutions in supporting economic development, the alleviation of rural and urban poverty, and gender equity. Analysis of the strengths and limits of commercial banks, public development banks, credit unions, and microcredit organizations both in the U.S. and internationally. Readings include academic journal articles, formal case studies, evaluations, and annual reports. Priority to students who have taken any portion of the social innovation series: URBANST 131, 132, or 133. Recommended: ECON 1A or 1B.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PUBLPOL 154: Politics and Policy in California

State politics and policy making, including the roles of the legislature, legislative leadership, governor, special interests, campaign finance, advocacy groups, ballot initiatives, state and federal laws, media, and research organizations. Case studies involving budgets, education, pensions, health care, political reform, environmental reforms, water, transportation and more. Evaluation of political actions, both inside and outside of government, that can affect California policy and social outcomes. Meetings with elected officials, policymakers, and advocates in class and during a day-long field trip to Sacramento.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PUBLPOL 156: Health Care Policy and Reform

Focuses on healthcare policy at the national, state, and local levels. Includes sessions on international models, health insurance, the evolution of healthcare policy in the U.S., key U.S. healthcare topics (Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Medicare, Medicaid, public employee retiree health care), the role of technology, reform proposals (single payer, national health care, consumer-based systems, regulated markets, state and local reform efforts), efficiency/cost drivers and prospects for future policy. The course includes sessions on effective memo writing and presentation of policy proposals.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PUBLPOL 158: Housing & Community Development--Policy and Practice (URBANST 168)

How federal, state and local governments have worked with private and nonprofit sector actors in creating housing, as well as downtown, waterfront and neighborhood development. Legal and financial mechanisms, tax policy, reuse of historic structures, affordable shelter.
Terms: not given next year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 159: Economic, Legal, and Political Analysis of Climate-Change Policy (EARTHSYS 159, ECON 159, ECON 209)

This course will advance students understanding of economic, legal, and political approaches to avoiding or managing the problem of global climate change. Theoretical contributions as well as empirical analyses will be considered. It will address economic issues, legal constraints, and political challenges associated with various emissions-reduction and adaptation strategies, and it will consider policy efforts at the local, national, and international levels. Specific topics include: interactions among overlapping climate policies, the strengths and weaknesses of alternative policy instruments, trade-offs among alternative policy objectives, and decision making under uncertainty. Prerequisites: Econ 50 or its equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 166: The Politics of Epidemics (FEMGEN 146)

When it comes to healthcare, whose bodies matter, who deserves care? How do scholars, activists, and patients confront and combat widespread healthcare disparities? This course explores prevailing epidemics of our moment (including HIV/AIDS, breast cancer, opioid addiction, and Lyme disease) in order to consider how infectious disease, moral panic, and national identity interplay across public health platforms, scientific research, and popular rhetoric. We will utilize intersectional frameworks to consider the histories, politics, and broader context of current epidemiological data and larger questions about doctor bias, the gender gap in pain, and cultural fears related to illness and the body. How do treatment, media coverage, policy, and access to care change according to population, location, and technology?
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Crandall, M. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints