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611 - 620 of 717 results for: all courses

PUBLPOL 190: Indigenous Cultural Heritage: Protection, Practice, Repatriation (ARTHIST 190A, ARTHIST 490A, PUBLPOL 290)

This interdisciplinary seminar explores pressing questions relating to the protection, practice and repatriation of the cultural heritage of Indigenous peoples from North America and beyond. Using an innovative combination of in-class lectures and videos of interviews with renowned experts, including Indigenous leaders, scholars, artists and performers and museum professionals from around the world, this seminar will explore and problematize, among other subjects: the impact of colonialism, urbanization and other political, legal, economic, religious and cultural forces on understandings and definitions of "indigenous" and "cultural heritage"; the development of international law relating to Indigenous peoples¿ cultural rights; international, domestic, and tribal heritage protection and repatriation laws/initiatives including the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), the 1990 US Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), and more »
This interdisciplinary seminar explores pressing questions relating to the protection, practice and repatriation of the cultural heritage of Indigenous peoples from North America and beyond. Using an innovative combination of in-class lectures and videos of interviews with renowned experts, including Indigenous leaders, scholars, artists and performers and museum professionals from around the world, this seminar will explore and problematize, among other subjects: the impact of colonialism, urbanization and other political, legal, economic, religious and cultural forces on understandings and definitions of "indigenous" and "cultural heritage"; the development of international law relating to Indigenous peoples¿ cultural rights; international, domestic, and tribal heritage protection and repatriation laws/initiatives including the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), the 1990 US Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), and others; past and present Western museum practices and guidelines relating to display, preservation, provenance research and repatriation of indigenous cultural material; the meaning of repatriation to Indigenous peoples and other stakeholders; and resolving repatriation disputes, including by alternative dispute resolution (ADR) processes. While case studies will relate primarily to Indigenous peoples of North America, comparisons will be drawn with the situation of Indigenous peoples in other regions, such as Oceania and Russia. Each week students will brainstorm actionable ideas for amending/supplementing current frameworks in order to give force to the cultural rights enumerated in UNDRIP. The overall seminar experience will involve discussions of lectures and video content, assigned readings, quizzes, a class visit to the Cantor Center Native Americas collection, and visits to our classroom by experts. Elements used in grading: class participation, attendance and a final project (one-day take-home exam; or research paper or film project with instructor's consent).
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PWR 91MC: Intermediate Writing : Activist Rhetoric

How do activists effectively strategize for social change? In this hands-on approach to studying activism and social justice issues, students will encounter new methods for mass communication, collaboration, and self-inquiry. First, we will consider how activists address practical problems in a variety of contexts, from protest movements to direct action, political lobbying to philanthrocapitalism, from Black Lives Matter to immigration activists. We will visit Stanford Special Collections to find inspiration in the Huey P. Newton Collection--the archive of the Black Panther Party. To inform these experiences, we will read and analyze texts by the Combahee River Collective, Angela Davis, Judith Butler, Fred Moten, and Jackie Wang, as well as inviting several activists to visit our classroom. Through collaborative and creative coursework, students will gain experience in intersectional thinking, community organizing, and collective action by conducting teach-ins, writing their own socia more »
How do activists effectively strategize for social change? In this hands-on approach to studying activism and social justice issues, students will encounter new methods for mass communication, collaboration, and self-inquiry. First, we will consider how activists address practical problems in a variety of contexts, from protest movements to direct action, political lobbying to philanthrocapitalism, from Black Lives Matter to immigration activists. We will visit Stanford Special Collections to find inspiration in the Huey P. Newton Collection--the archive of the Black Panther Party. To inform these experiences, we will read and analyze texts by the Combahee River Collective, Angela Davis, Judith Butler, Fred Moten, and Jackie Wang, as well as inviting several activists to visit our classroom. Through collaborative and creative coursework, students will gain experience in intersectional thinking, community organizing, and collective action by conducting teach-ins, writing their own social justice manifesto, and planning a final campus-wide action.nnThis course is part of the PWR advanced elective track in Social and Racial Justice (SRJ). Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. See https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-courses/activist-rhetoric for full course description.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 194AJ: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Contemporary Black Rhetorics: Black Twitter and Black Digital Cultures (AFRICAAM 194)

Does not fulfill NSC requirement. This course will examine Black engagements with digital culture as sites for community building, social action and individual and collective identity formation. By studying phenomena like #BlackTwitter, memes, Vine, selfie culture, blogging, "social watching," and more, we will explore how Black technology use addresses questions like identity performance and expression, hyper visibility and invisibility of Black lives, Black feminisms, misogynoir and Black women/femme leadership in social movements, the roles and influence of Black Queer cultures online, and social activism and movements in online spaces. nnFrom #YouOKSis, #BlackLivesMatter and #AfroLatinidad to the Clapback, roasts and "reads," we will work from the serious to the silly, from individuals to collectives, from activism to everyday life, and from distinct Black cultures to diasporic connections and exchange. Participants in the course will create a social media autobiography, a "read/in more »
Does not fulfill NSC requirement. This course will examine Black engagements with digital culture as sites for community building, social action and individual and collective identity formation. By studying phenomena like #BlackTwitter, memes, Vine, selfie culture, blogging, "social watching," and more, we will explore how Black technology use addresses questions like identity performance and expression, hyper visibility and invisibility of Black lives, Black feminisms, misogynoir and Black women/femme leadership in social movements, the roles and influence of Black Queer cultures online, and social activism and movements in online spaces. nnFrom #YouOKSis, #BlackLivesMatter and #AfroLatinidad to the Clapback, roasts and "reads," we will work from the serious to the silly, from individuals to collectives, from activism to everyday life, and from distinct Black cultures to diasporic connections and exchange. Participants in the course will create a social media autobiography, a "read/ing" of a Black cultural practice or phenomenon online, host an online discussion, and prepare a pitch for a longer research project they might pursue as a thesis or an ongoing study. Bring your GIFs, memes, and emoji, and a willingness to be in community both online and off for this new course! Prerequisite: first level of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 194CW: Brave New Worlds: An Introduction to (De)colonial Rhetorics

Since the time of Columbus, colonial agendas and policies have engendered their own rhetorics of justification and explanation. After all, European modernism began with the encounter of the New World, and Europe¿s own identity was forged in the process of ¿Latinization¿ of the Western Hemisphere. In response, decoloniality arose as a rich intellectual critique in the late 1990s in South America and the Caribbean. Decolonial rhetorical traditions stand in a unique position vis-à-vis the development of modernity, colonialism, racialized identities, the crisis of European reason, and the dawn of globalization. In an era of Trumpism, in which European modernity once again justifies restricting the mobility and freedom of Latinx immigrants, among other ethnic groups, perhaps no other form of intellectual critique seems quite so urgent. This course introduces students to primary decolonial rhetorical texts and asks students to apply these insights to pressing contemporary challenges by practicing deep reading of primary and secondary texts, preparing group presentations, and exploring creative acts of composition with an eye toward imagining brave new worlds and the decolonial rhetorical practices valued therein.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wright, C. (PI)

PWR 194EP: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Introduction to Environmental Justice: Race, Class, Gender and Place (CSRE 132E, EARTHSYS 194, URBANST 155EP)

Environmental justice means ensuring equal access to environmental benefits and preventing the disproportionate impacts of environmental harms for all communities regardless of gender, class, race, ethnicity or other social positions. This introductory course examines the rhetoric, history and key case studies of environmental justice while encouraging critical and collaborative thinking, reading and researching about diversity in environmental movements within the global community and at Stanford, including the ways race, class and gender have shaped environmental battles still being fought today from Standing Rock to Flint, Michigan. We center diverse voices by bringing leaders, particularly from marginalized communities on the frontlines to our classroom to communicate experiences, insights and best practices. Together we will develop and present original research projects which may serve a particular organizational or community need, such as racialized dispossession, toxic pollution and human health, or indigenous land and water rights, among many others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 194KT: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: The Last Hopi On Earth: The Rhetoric of Entertainment Inequity (CSRE 194KT)

While #OscarsSoWhite brought attention to the Academy's overwhelmingly White, male membership, the underbelly of the entertainment industry itself is rife with inequitable hiring of not only on-camera and on-stage performers but also directors, writers, and others behind the scenes. While there are several organizations from Racebending.com to the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media that seek to usher in more equitable representation, push back against the Industry's disparate employment practices has been documented for more than fifty years with what many argue is not proportionally positive movement. White males still garner almost half of all theatrical and television roles and represent more than 80% of episodic directors while entertainment hubs Los Angeles and New York City are more than 50% people of color and female. What will it take to attain equity in the entertainment industry? Why does it matter? nnIn this course, students will examine rhetorical issues in promoting, more »
While #OscarsSoWhite brought attention to the Academy's overwhelmingly White, male membership, the underbelly of the entertainment industry itself is rife with inequitable hiring of not only on-camera and on-stage performers but also directors, writers, and others behind the scenes. While there are several organizations from Racebending.com to the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media that seek to usher in more equitable representation, push back against the Industry's disparate employment practices has been documented for more than fifty years with what many argue is not proportionally positive movement. White males still garner almost half of all theatrical and television roles and represent more than 80% of episodic directors while entertainment hubs Los Angeles and New York City are more than 50% people of color and female. What will it take to attain equity in the entertainment industry? Why does it matter? nnIn this course, students will examine rhetorical issues in promoting, defending, and opposing entertainment industry practices - writing and speaking across genres in persuasive response - and ultimately develop a collaborative 5-year strategic plan to usher in equity.n nThis course is part of the PWR advanced elective track in Social and Racial Justice (SRJ). Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For video course description, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-courses/last-hopi-earth-rhetoric-entertainment-inequity.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 194MF: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: In the Margins: Race, Gender and the Rhetoric of Science

Every day a new headline alerts us to the lack of race and gender diversity in the tech sector in Silicon Valley. At the same time, science and technology are often lauded as objective systems capable of producing color- and gender-blind truths and social good for all of us. This course pushes beyond the headlines and the hashtags to think about the complex relationship between gender, race and science. Together we will research chronically understudied voices and contributions in the history of science and technology and have the opportunity to read and participate in some of the efforts to highlight their stories through a Wikipedia edit-a-thon and final research project. We will also rigorously think through why the historical and current under-representation of women and people of color matters for the questions that are asked, methodologies that are used, and science and technology that is eventually produced. This course fulfills the advanced PWR requirement for the Notation in Science Communication (NSC). Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 194SS: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Making Rhetoric Matter: Human Rights at Home (CSRE 194SS)

'Human rights' often sounds like it needs defending in far-off places: in distant public squares where soldiers menace gatherings of citizens, in dark jails where prisoners are tortured for their politics, in unknown streets where gender inequality has brutal consequences. But Bryan Stevenson, a lawyer fighting for social and racial justice in the jails of Alabama, proposes that we try 'proximity': that we get close to the injustices that are already close to us. This class thus takes human rights as a local issue, focusing on how terms like 'human' and 'rights' are interpreted on our campus and in our neighborhoods, cities, and region. Instead of a traditional human rights policy framework, we'll use the lens of intersectional ethics to explore specific rhetorical issues in gender politics, citizenship, higher education, police brutality, and mass incarceration. We will write, speak, and move across genres, responding to the work of incarcerated artists, creating embodied workshops, ' more »
'Human rights' often sounds like it needs defending in far-off places: in distant public squares where soldiers menace gatherings of citizens, in dark jails where prisoners are tortured for their politics, in unknown streets where gender inequality has brutal consequences. But Bryan Stevenson, a lawyer fighting for social and racial justice in the jails of Alabama, proposes that we try 'proximity': that we get close to the injustices that are already close to us. This class thus takes human rights as a local issue, focusing on how terms like 'human' and 'rights' are interpreted on our campus and in our neighborhoods, cities, and region. Instead of a traditional human rights policy framework, we'll use the lens of intersectional ethics to explore specific rhetorical issues in gender politics, citizenship, higher education, police brutality, and mass incarceration. We will write, speak, and move across genres, responding to the work of incarcerated artists, creating embodied workshops, 'translating' ideas into new media (does someone you know need an animated video about gender pronouns? Or maybe it's time for a podcast about #PrisonRenaissance?), doing collaborative research, and 'writing back' to our audiences. For course video and full description see: https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-courses/making-rhetoric-matter-human-rights-home.nnThis course is part of the PWR advanced elective track in Social and Racial Justice (SRJ). Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

REES 87S: Jewish Christmas Trees, Kosher Pork: Soviet Jews and the New Jewish Diaspora (HISTORY 87S, JEWISHST 87S)

This course examines the historical roots of contemporary Russian Jewish culture and identity in North America, Israel, and the former Soviet Union: from the Russian Revolution through the collapse of the USSR. The course also emphasizes the story of Soviet Jewish migration and diaspora; it explores the anxieties of immigration and acceptance, the wages of acculturation and assimilation, and the interplay between cultural displacement and nostalgia. Following a highly interdisciplinary approach, this course introduces a wide range of printed, visual, and oral sources, including contemporary Russian Jewish fiction and Soviet war journalism, Soviet cartoons, photography, art, film, music, and archival materials. Students will conduct oral histories with Soviet emigres and taste (and cook) food from the Soviet Jewish kitchen. The course investigates questions particular to the Jewish experience, but also universal concerns about identity, migration, and diaspora in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. All readings are in English. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Tapper, J. (PI)

REES 145D: Jewish American Literature (AMSTUD 145D, ENGLISH 145D, JEWISHST 155D)

From its inception, Jewish-American literature has taken as its subject as well as its context the idea of Jewishness itself. Jewish culture is a diasporic one, and for this reason the concept of Jewishness differs from country to country and across time. What stays remarkably similar, though, is Jewish self-perception and relatedly Jewish literary style. This is as true for the first-generation immigrant writers like Isaac Bashevis Singer and Anzia Yezierska who came to the United States from abroad as it is for their second-generation children born in the United States, and the children of those children. In this course, we will consider the difficulties of displacement for the emigrant generation and their efforts to sustain their cultural integrity in the multicultural American environment. We'll also examine the often comic revolt of their American-born children and grandchildren against their (grand-)parents nostalgia and failure to assimilate. Only by considering these transnati more »
From its inception, Jewish-American literature has taken as its subject as well as its context the idea of Jewishness itself. Jewish culture is a diasporic one, and for this reason the concept of Jewishness differs from country to country and across time. What stays remarkably similar, though, is Jewish self-perception and relatedly Jewish literary style. This is as true for the first-generation immigrant writers like Isaac Bashevis Singer and Anzia Yezierska who came to the United States from abroad as it is for their second-generation children born in the United States, and the children of those children. In this course, we will consider the difficulties of displacement for the emigrant generation and their efforts to sustain their cultural integrity in the multicultural American environment. We'll also examine the often comic revolt of their American-born children and grandchildren against their (grand-)parents nostalgia and failure to assimilate. Only by considering these transnational roots can one understand the particularity of the Jewish-American novel in relation to mainstream and minority American literatures. In investigating the link between American Jewish writers and their literary progenitors, we will draw largely but not exclusively from Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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