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NATIVEAM 143A: American Indian Mythology, Legend, and Lore (AMSTUD 143M, ENGLISH 43A, ENGLISH 143A)

(English majors and others taking 5 units, register for 143A.) Readings from American Indian literatures, old and new. Stories, songs, and rituals from the 19th century, including the Navajo Night Chant. Tricksters and trickster stories; war, healing, and hunting songs; Aztec songs from the 16th century. Readings from modern poets and novelists including N. Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, and Leslie Marmon Silko, and the classic autobiography, "Black Elk Speaks."
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fields, K. (PI)

NATIVEAM 204: Indigenous Poetics and the Politics of Resistance (COMPLIT 204)

In 1969 a group of university students and Native activists calling themselves the Indians of All Tribes gathered on Alcatraz Island in an act of political protest that would turn out to be the longest occupation of U.S. lands in the nation's history. Claiming title to the territory under a nineteenth-century treaty, the Indians of All Tribes broadcasted their protest through an independent radio show and newsletter that included important political and poetic writings by the activists. This course builds outward from the Occupation of Alcatraz to understand the deep historical relationship between political resistance and poetic expression in Indigenous communities. We will read broadly on poetics and Indigenous political theory, beginning with non-alphabetic writings and Indigenous understandings of communal and political life, and concluding with formally innovative collections by Indigenous poets working on issues like climate justice and language revitalization.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hickey, A. (PI)

NATIVEAM 211: The California Missions: Art History and Reconciliation (ARTHIST 211, CSRE 111)

Sites of the spirit and devotion, sites of genocide, foreboding actors in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, the subject of fourth-grade school projects, the Spanish Missions of Alta California are complex sites of inquiry, their meanings and associations different for each visitor. This seminar examines the art and architecture of the California Missions built between 1769 and 1823. Constructed with local materials and decorated with reredos, paintings and sculptures from Mexico and Spain, the Missions are at once humble spaces and flagships of a belated global baroque. They were also the laboratories of indigenous artists and artisans. This course seeks to understand how Mission art was meant to function, how and why it was made, what its materials were, while asking what the larger role of art was in a global system of missions. Can the study of this art lead to the reconciliation of populations in North America and within the field of art history? The Missions require a specific reexamination of the relationship between European and colonial forms, not as objects of curiosity or diffusion but as viable and globally informed agents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kinew, S. (PI)

OSPAUSTL 40: Australian Studies

Introduction to Australian society, history, culture, politics, and identity. Social and cultural framework and working understanding of Australia in relationship to the focus on coastal environment in other program courses. Field trips.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPBER 54: The Performance of Memory

The Performance of Memory is a lecture/discussion/field trip class probing how nationalism, memorialization and tourism around trauma have made Germany a landscape of memory. Exploring sites related to WWII, the Holocaust and the Soviet occupation - including a former Stassi Prison and concentration camp - we trace how history and contemporary culture intertwine in Germany and how post reunification tourism to Third Reich and Jewish sites in and around Berlin are transforming locales of trauma into a new type of immersion theatre.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ross, J. (PI)

OSPBER 71: EU in Crisis

Challenges confronting Europe as a whole and the EU in particular: impact of the sovereign debt crisis of the Eurozone, mass migration, external and internal security challenges, as well as political and social needs for reform. How the EU and its members respond and if the opportunities of these crises are constructively used for reform - or wasted (Crisis = Danger + Opportunity). Analyse institutions, interests and competing narratives to explain the current situation in Europe. Excursion to Athens or similar to get a non-German perspective on the crises.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Bruckner, U. (PI)

OSPBER 174: Sports, Culture, and Gender in Comparative Perspective

Theory and history of mass spectator sports and their role in modern societies. Comparisons with U.S., Britain, and France; the peculiarities of sports in German culture. Body and competition cultures, with emphasis on the entry of women into sports, the modification of body ideals, and the formation and negotiation of gender identities in and through sports. The relationship between sports and politics, including the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games. In German. Prerequisite: completion of GERLANG 3 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPCPTWN 38: Genocide: African Experiences in Comparative Perspective

Genocide as a major social and historical phenomenon, contextualized within African history. Time frame ranging from the extermination of indigenous Canary Islanders in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries to more recent mass killings in Rwanda and Darfur. Emphasis on southern African case studies such Cape San communities and the Herero people in Namibia. Themes include: roles of racism, colonialism and nationalism in the making of African genocides. Relevance of other social phenomena such as modernity, Social Darwinism, ethnicity, warfare and revolution. Comparative perspective to elucidate global dimensions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Adhikari, M. (PI)

OSPCPTWN 70: Youth Citizenship and Community Engagement

Critical thinking about core concepts in community engagement such as community, self, and identity. The course aims to cultivate a critical consciousness about the meaning of charity, caring, social justice and the aims of engagement with communities to enhance self awareness, awareness of others who are different, awareness of social issues, and an ethic of care where students can be change agents. The meaning of youth citizenship as it relates to engagement with communities will be explored.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 8: Migration and Cultural Diversity in Contemporary Italy

Exploration of the media as an arena where Italian national and individual identities (of both migrants and natives) are being redefined in an age of globalization, massive migration flows and increasing social diversity. Over the last thirty years, Italy has been transformed from a country of exclusive emigration into a country where recent immigration is becoming one of the most controversial issues faced by Italian society and the political system today.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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