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541 - 550 of 675 results for: all courses

OSPSANTG 118X: Artistic Expression in Latin America

Elite, mass-media, and popular cultural changes in Chile under conditions of economic and political liberalization. The reception of cultural meanings from the center of the world social system (U.S., EU, and Japan), reformulation to respond to local conditions, and export in the shape of cultural artifacts. Innovative elements rooted in the regional and local culture.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PEDS 65N: Understanding Children's Health Disparities

The social and economic factors that affect children and their health status. The principal sources of disparities in the health of children in the U.S. are not biologic, but social and economic. Topics include ethnic, cultural, and behavioral factors that affect children's health, both directly and indirectly; lack of health insurance; and current proposals for health care reform, focusing specifically on how they will impact existing health disparities among children.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Barr, D. (PI)

PHIL 28: The Literature and Philosophy of Place

Literature and philosophy, primarily, but not exclusively from Latin America, that raises questions about place and displacement through migration and exile, about how location shapes our understanding of ourselves and of our responsibilities to society and environment, about the multiple meanings of home. Among the questions we will consider are the difference between the experiences of people who are at "home" and those who are "away," how one person's claim on home can be another's experience of being invaded, the interdependence of self and place, the multiple meanings of "environment." Readings by Gabriela Mistral, Pablo Neruda, Carmen Lyra, Jorge Gracia, Otavio Paz, Maria Lugones, among others.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2015 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PHIL 175A: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 179A: Feminist and Queer Theories and Methods Across the Disciplines (FEMGEN 103, FEMGEN 203, PHIL 279A)

(Graduate Students register for PHIL 279A or FEMGEN 203) This course is an opportunity to explore the difference feminist and queer perspectives make in creative arts, humanities, and social science research.nPrerequisites: Feminist Studies 101 or equivalent with consent of instructor.nNOTE: This course must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for WAYS credit. The 2 unit option is for graduate students only.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 11N: The Rwandan Genocide

Preference to freshmen. In 1994, more than 800,000 Tutsi and moderate Hutu Rwandans were killed in the most rapid genocide in history. What could bring humans to carry out such violence? Could it have been prevented? Why did no major power intervene to stop the killing? Should the U.N. be held accountable? What were the consequences for Central Africa? How have international actors respond to the challenges of reconstructing Rwanda? What happened to the perpetrators? Sources include scholarly and journalistic accounts.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 28N: The Changing Nature of Racial Identity in American Politics

Almost one-third of Americans now identify with a racial/ethnic minority group. This seminar examines the relationship between racial identity, group consciousness, and public opinion. Topics include the role of government institutions in shaping identification, challenges in defining and measuring race, attitudes towards race-based policies, and the development of political solidarity within racial groups. Particular attention will be paid to the construction of political identities among the growing mixed-race population.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2013 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 29N: Mixed-Race Politics and Culture (AFRICAAM 52N, ENGLISH 52N)

Today, almost one-third of Americans identify with a racial/ethnic minority group, and more than 9 million Americans identify with multiple races. What are the implications of such diversity for American politics and culture? In this course, we approach issues of race from an interdisciplinary perspective, employing research in the social sciences and humanities to assess how race shapes perceptions of identity as well as political behavior in 21st century U.S. We will examine issues surrounding the role of multiculturalism, immigration, acculturation, racial representation and racial prejudice in American society. Topics we will explore include the political and social formation of "race"; racial representation in the media, arts, and popular culture; the rise and decline of the "one-drop rule" and its effect on political and cultural attachments; the politicization of Census categories and the rise of the Multiracial Movement.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 43Q: Immigration Crisis? Policy Dilemmas in the US and Europe

Immigration is a hotly contested social, economic, and political phenomenon in countries throughout the world. People migrate for many reasons, including the desire to start careers, reunite families, and escape oppression. While each story of migration is unique, migration in the modern world has certain commonalities, and these patterns often manifest as political conflict. Labor migration promises economic productivity and efficiency but may threaten existing labor protections and social welfare guarantees to natives. Facilitating migration from failed nation-states may protect the human rights of migrants but introduce security concerns. In the 21st century, the world has witnessed political violence¿by natives and migrants, both first and second generations¿including the September 11th attacks, the London bombings, the mass killings in Norway, and the Paris attacks. How can policymakers harness the promises of immigration without succumbing to its pitfalls? Why do some countries r more »
Immigration is a hotly contested social, economic, and political phenomenon in countries throughout the world. People migrate for many reasons, including the desire to start careers, reunite families, and escape oppression. While each story of migration is unique, migration in the modern world has certain commonalities, and these patterns often manifest as political conflict. Labor migration promises economic productivity and efficiency but may threaten existing labor protections and social welfare guarantees to natives. Facilitating migration from failed nation-states may protect the human rights of migrants but introduce security concerns. In the 21st century, the world has witnessed political violence¿by natives and migrants, both first and second generations¿including the September 11th attacks, the London bombings, the mass killings in Norway, and the Paris attacks. How can policymakers harness the promises of immigration without succumbing to its pitfalls? Why do some countries respond so differently than others in similar circumstances? When does the meaning of citizenship evolve and when does it stay the same? What lessons do other countries have for the United States as it considers immigration reform? n n This course is designed to provide students with an overview of immigration law and politics in the United States and other countries, particularly in the European Union. Students will develop the necessary tools to critically analyze immigration policies, starting with the historical evolution of immigration policy in the United States. We will visit Angel Island and discuss the legacy of the Chinese Exclusion Act as well as contemporary immigration politics in San Francisco, a so-called ¿sanctuary city¿ for undocumented immigrants. There will also be a screening on La Haine (Hate), an acclaimed French film which chronicles the challenges of immigrant integration. Students will study the economics of immigration and the politics of refugees in the context of post-9/11 security dilemmas. Students will design a concrete immigration policy proposal.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 115E: Japan & the World: Innovation, Economic Growth, Globalization, and Int'l Security Challenges (EASTASN 153, EASTASN 253, ECON 120)

This course introduces students to the economy, politics, and international relations of contemporary Japan. The course puts a particular emphasis on several emerging issues in Japan including innovation and economic dynamism, Japan's contributions to international peace and cooperation, and Japan's response to international economic and geopolitical challenges. The course will invite several guest instructors, each of whom is an expert on at least one of the issues that Japan faces today, to give lectures in addition to the main instructors. The guest lecturers will also be available outside of the classroom for further discussion during their stays at Stanford.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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