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481 - 490 of 905 results for: all courses

HISTORY 238C: Mapping the Grand Tour: Digital Methods for Historical Data (CLASSICS 115, ENGLISH 115, ITALIAN 115)

Classical Italy attracted thousands of travelers throughout the 1700s. Referring to their journey as the "Grand Tour," travelers pursued intellectual passions, promoted careers, and satisfied wanderlust, all while collecting antiquities to fill museums and estates back home. What can digital approaches tell us about who traveled, where and why? We will read travel accounts; experiment with parsing; and visualize historical data. Final projects to form credited contributions to the Grand Tour Project, a cutting-edge digital platform. No prior experience necessary.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 238J: The European Scramble for Africa: Origins and Debates (AFRICAAM 238J, HISTORY 338J)

Why and how did Europeans claim control of 70% of African in the late nineteenth century? Students will engage with historiographical debates ranging from the national (e.g. British) to the topical (e.g. international law). Students will interrogate some of the primary sources on which debaters have rested their arguments. Key discussions include: the British occupation of Egypt; the autonomy of French colonial policy; the mystery of Germany¿s colonial entry; and, not least, the notorious Berlin Conference of 1884-1885.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Press, S. (PI)

HISTORY 243C: People, Plants, and Medicine: Colonial Science and Medicine (HISTORY 343C)

Explores the global exchange of knowledge, technologies, plants, peoples, disease, and medicines. Considers primarily Africans, Amerindians, and Europeans in the eighteenth-century West but also takes examples from other knowledge traditions. Readings treat science and medicine in relation to voyaging, colonialism, slavery, racism, plants, and environmental exchange. Colonial sciences and medicines were important militarily and strategically for positioning emerging nation states in global struggles for land and resources.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 248S: Colonial States and African Societies, Part I (HISTORY 448A)

( History 248S is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 448A is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) Colonialism set in motion profound transformations of African societies. These transformations did not occur immediately following military conquest, nor did they occur uniformly throughout the continent. This research seminar will focus directly on the encounter between the colonial state and African societies. The seminar will examine problems of social transformation, the role of the colonial state, and the actions of Africans. Following four weeks of collloquim style discussion, students then embark on independent research on the encounter between one colonial state and its constituent African societies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Roberts, R. (PI)

HISTORY 250E: Taxing America: From the Puritans to Prop. 13

Taxes have shaped American society and politics since before the Revolution. And they've been extremely controversial just as long. In this course we'll try to understand American society and government by looking at the politics of taxation from the colonial period to the twentieth century. Topics include the legitimacy of taxation, the constitution, economic development, inequality, gender, and race.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 252: Originalism and the American Constitution: History and Interpretation (HISTORY 352)

Except for the Bible no text has been the subject of as much modern interpretive scrutiny as the United States Constitution. This course explores both the historical dimensions of its creation as well as the meaning such knowledge should bring to bear on its subsequent interpretation. In light of the modern obsession with the document's "original meaning," this course will explore the intersections of history, law, and textual meaning to probe what an "original" interpretation of the Constitution looks like.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gienapp, J. (PI)

HISTORY 252C: The Old South: Culture, Society, and Slavery (AFRICAAM 252C, CSRE 252C)

This course explores the political, social, and cultural history of the antebellum American South, with an emphasis on the history of African-American slavery. Topics include race and race making, slave community and resistance, gender and reproduction, class and immigration, commodity capitalism, technology, disease and climate, indigenous Southerners, white southern honor culture, the Civil War, and the region's place in national mythmaking and memory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 252E: From Gold Rush to Google Bus: History of San Francisco (AMSTUD 150X, URBANST 150)

This class will examine the history of San Francisco from Native American and colonial settlement through the present. Focus is on social, environmental, and political history, with the theme of power in the city. Topics include Native Americans, the Gold Rush, immigration and nativism, railroads and robber barons, earthquake and fire, progressive reform and unionism, gender, race and civil rights, sexuality and politics, counterculture, redevelopment and gentrification. Students write final project in collaboration with ShapingSF, a participatory community history project documenting and archiving overlooked stories and memories of San Francisco. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kahan, M. (PI)

HISTORY 254: Popular Culture and American Nature

Despite John Muir, Aldo Leopold, and Rachel Carson, it is arguable that the Disney studios have more to do with molding popular attitudes toward the natural world than politicians, ecologists, and activists. Disney as the central figure in the 20th-century American creation of nature. How Disney, the products of his studio, and other primary and secondary texts see environmentalism, science, popular culture, and their interrelationships.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: White, R. (PI)

HISTORY 254G: The Causes and Consequences of the American Revolution

Why did Britain's North American colonies declare independence from an empire they had long revered? What did the American Revolution mean for the people who experienced it? In this course we will explore the explosive origins of the American republic. Topics: revolutionary ideology, empire, the federal constitution, slavery, social conflict, and the international consequences of the American Revolution.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2014 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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