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431 - 440 of 908 results for: all courses

HISTORY 117: Ancient Empires: Near East (CLASSICS 81)

Why do imperialists conquer people? Why do some people resist while others collaborate? This course tries to answer these questions by looking at some of the world's earliest empires. The main focus is on the expansion of the Assyrian and Persian Empires between 900 and 300 BC and the consequences for the ancient Jews, Egyptians, and Greeks. The main readings come from the Bible, Herodotus, and Assyrian and Persian royal inscriptions, and the course combines historical and archaeological data with social scientific approaches. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 120A: The Russian Empire, 1450-1800

(Same as HISTORY 20A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 120A.) Explores rise of Russian state and expanse of empire; patterns of governance of a Eurasian empire; strategies and institutions of governance; survey of various ethnic and religious groups in empire and their varied cultures and political economies; gender and family; serfdom; Russian Orthodox religion and culture; reforms and Europeanization of 18th century.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kollmann, N. (PI)

HISTORY 134A: The European Witch Hunts

(Same as HISTORY 34A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 134A.) After the Reformation, in the midst of state-building and scientific discovery, Europeans conducted a series of deadly witch hunts, violating their own laws and procedures in the process. What was it about early modernity that fueled witch hunting? Examines witch trials and early modern demonology as well as historians' interpretations of events to seek answers to this question.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 137D: Germany's Wars and the World, 1848-2010 (HISTORY 37D)

This course examines a series of explosive encounters between Germans, Europe, and the world. Starting with the overlooked revolutions of 1848 and ending with the reunification of West Germany and East Germany after the Cold War, the course will explore a range of topics: capitalism, communism, imperialism, nationalism, diplomacy, antisemitism, gender, race, and the Holocaust, among others. We will also consider competing visions of Germany its borders, its members, its enemies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Press, S. (PI)

HISTORY 138G: Europe and Its Great Migrations: The Modern Period (HISTORY 38G)

From the "Germanic" people's migrations of antiquity to the global refugee crises of today, migration has left an indelible mark on European society. What are the causes and consequences of periods of "mass" migration? Surveying major episodes in recent European migration history, we will explore how human mobility has historically shaped culture, politics, economics, and society on this continent. Special attention will be given to the 19th century, an exceptional chapter in global migration history that saw some 55 million Europeans departing for the Americas.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hein, B. (PI)

HISTORY 140: World History of Science

(Same as HISTORY 40. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 140.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 140A: The Scientific Revolution

What do people know and how do they know it? What counts as scientific knowledge? In the 16th and 17th centuries, understanding the nature of knowledge engaged the attention of individuals and institutions including Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, the early Royal Society, and less well-known contemporaries. New meanings of observing, collecting, experimenting, and philosophizing, and political, religious, and cultural ramifications in early modern Europe.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 144: Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering (FEMGEN 144)

(Same as HISTORY 44. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in HISTORY 144.) Men's and women's roles in science, medicine, and engineering over the past 200 years with a focus on the present. What efforts are underway globally to transform research institutions so that both men's and women's careers can flourish? How have science and medicine studied and defined males and females? How can we harness the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 145B: Africa in the 20th Century (AFRICAAM 145B)

(Same as HISTORY 45B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 145B.) The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Roberts, R. (PI)

HISTORY 146: History of Humanitarian Aid in sub-Saharan Africa

Explores humanitarian endeavors through the era of the slave trade, colonialism, the Cold War and the present. Our focus is both local and global examining international humanitarian policy and the effects and perceptions of humanitarian aid within different African localities. Assignments use primary and secondary sources including organizational reports, ethnographies, memoirs and film. Topics: anti-slave trade and abolition movements, `civilizing¿ missions, development, refugees, peacekeeping, famine and women's rights.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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