2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

331 - 340 of 651 results for: all courses

HISTORY 223: Art and Ideas in Imperial Russia (HISTORY 323)

Poetry, novels, symphonic music, theater, opera, painting, design, and architecture: what they reveal about the politics and culture of tsarist Russia.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2009 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 230A: The Witness in Modern History: Memoir, Reportage, Image

The rise of the witness as icon and debates about its reliability as a historical source. The power of eyewitness accounts to convict accused criminals, inspire indignation about war and genocide, and attract attention to humanitarian crises. Their notorious unreliability due to exaggeration and misapprehension. Sources include reportage, photography, and documentary film. Case studies include criminal cases, war, poverty, and natural disasters.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2010 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 231E: Paper, Printing, and Digital Revolutions: Transformations of the Book (HISTORY 331E)

What is a book? This seminar explores the conceptual implications of approximately two millennia of transformations in the physical and material properties of books. How have the meaning and authority we assign the written word changed as technologies of book production and dissemination have evolved, and how have they remained continuous? Topics covered include the rise of the medieval manuscript codex, the emergence of print culture in early modern Europe, and current debates over the nature of text in the digital age.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2014 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 232A: Power, Art, and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy (HISTORY 332A)

Provides a fundamental understanding of the cultural and political imagination of the Italian Renaissance, with particular emphasis on Florence between 1300 and 1600 CE. Topics include political and social upheavals, radical shifts in religious practice and devotion, the commercial revolution in trade and banking, the rediscovery of classical philosophy and style, and the flowering of the literary and visual arts.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Findlen, P. (PI)

HISTORY 236: The Ethics of Imperialism

Can a commitment to liberty, progress, and universal rights be reconciled with imperialism? The ethical underpinnings of empire; how modern Europeans provided ethical and political justifications for colonial expansion. How European ideals were used to defend and justify inequality, violence, and genocide. The ethics of American-driven globalization and humanitarianism. Texts include primary sources, philosophical treatises, and historical studies.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2007 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 239F: Empire and Information (HISTORY 339F)

How do states see? How do they know what they know about their subjects, citizens, economies, and geographies? How does that knowledge shape society, politics, identity, freedom, and modernity? Focus is on the British imperial state activities in S. Asia and Britain: surveillance technologies and information-gathering systems, including mapping, statistics, cultural schemata, and intelligence systems, to render geographies and social bodies legible, visible, and governable.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2005 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 254: Popular Culture and American Nature

Despite John Muir, Aldo Leopold, and Rachel Carson, it is arguable that the Disney studios have more to do with molding popular attitudes toward the natural world than politicians, ecologists, and activists. Disney as the central figure in the 20th-century American creation of nature. How Disney, the products of his studio, and other primary and secondary texts see environmentalism, science, popular culture, and their interrelationships.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: White, R. (PI)

HISTORY 254D: Religion and War in America (AMSTUD 105R, CSRE 105, HISTORY 354D, RELIGST 105)

Scholars have devoted much attention to wars in American history, but have not agreed as to whether religion was a major cause or simply a cover for political, economic, and other motives. We will compare interpretations that leave religion out, with those that take it into account. We will also look at the impact of war on the religious lives of ordinary Americans. We will examine both secondary as well as primary sources, beginning with King Philip's War in the 17th century, and ending with the "War on Terror" in the present day.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 255: Martin Luther King, Jr.: The Social Gospel and the Struggle for Justice

The religious and political thought of Martin Luther King, Jr., using the documentary resources of the King Institute at Stanford. His social gospel Christianity and prophetic message of radical social transformation. Readings include the forthcoming The Papers of Martin Luther King, Jr., Volume VI: Advocate of the Social Gospel.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2006 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 256G: Constructing Race and Religion in America (AFRICAAM 236, AMSTUD 246, CSRE 246, HISTORY 356G, RELIGST 246, RELIGST 346)

This seminar focuses on the interrelationships between social constructions of race, and social interpretations of religion in America. How have assumptions about race shaped religious worldviews? How have religious beliefs shaped racial attitudes? How have ideas about religion and race contributed to notions of what it means to be "American"? We will look at primary and secondary sources, and at the historical development of ideas and practices over time.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints