2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

311 - 320 of 396 results for: all courses

MUSIC 185: Technologies of Musical Expression

Music is made and experienced through technology created for it. These technologies allow for expression but influence the result. This course will utilize special collections, acoustical tools, music-making apps, live musicians, and media both historical and modern to reflect on the ways people make music expressive. The course is designed around creative projects and hands on experiences with digital and analogue media, player pianos, archival manuscripts, and sound sculptures to stimulate discussion about the role of technology in our musical experiences. Projects can include performances using digital and analogue media, performance art, creating player piano rolls, or performance ethnographies, etc. WAYS credit for 3 units and grade only.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 187: Spiritual Sound of Central Asia: Introduction to the Music of Central Asia

In this course, master-musician Imamyar Hasanov teaches students to perform and appreciate music from Central Asia. Students learn a spectrum of traditional Azerbaijani, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Uyghur and Uzbek folk melodies, including improvisational art music of mugham. The class is also a seminar, with discussions led by Professor Denise Gill on music of Central Asia, guest lectures and demonstrations, and Skype interviews with a musician in Kyrgyzstan and instrument maker in Istanbul. No prerequisites or prior knowledge of Azeri, Uzbek and Kyrgyz music for this course. Both a music workshop and seminar, this course is open to students who have experience playing musical instruments and those who do not. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways-ED credit. For Ways-CE credit, it may be taken for any number of units.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 192B: Advanced Sound Recording Technology

This course aims to heighten the listening skills of students. In a series of group sessions and discussions students compare and contrast a variety of dynamic based processes and other audio effects/plug-ins which might be used in their mixes. Students also explore recording concepts and technologies that will augment their studio practices such as making customized impulse response recordings, advanced equalization practices, and exploring additional advanced studio/non-studio techniques and software. Prerequisite: 192A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 222: Sound in Space

Historical background, techniques and theory on the use of space in music composition and diffusion. Listening and analysis of relevant pieces. Experimental work in spatialization techniques leading to short studies to be diffused in concert at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NENS 222: Dance, Movement and Medicine: Immersion in Dance for PD (DANCE 100)

Combining actual dancing with medical research, this Cardinal Course investigates the dynamic complementary relationship between two practices, medicine and dance, through the lens of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurological disease that manifests a range of movement disorders. "Dance for PD" is an innovative approach to dancing --and to teaching dance --for those challenged by PD. Course format consists of: 1. Weekly Lecture/Seminar Presentation: Partial list of instructors include Ms. Frank, Dr. Bronte-Stewart and other Stanford medical experts & research scientists, David Leventhal (Director, "Dance for PD") and Bay Area "Dance for PD" certified master teachers, film-maker Dave Iverson, Damara Ganley, and acclaimed choreographers Joe Goode, Alex Ketley, Judith Smith (AXIS Dance). 2. Weekly Dance Class: Stanford students will fully participate as dancers, and creative partners, in the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center's ongoing "Dance for Parkinson's" community dance cl more »
Combining actual dancing with medical research, this Cardinal Course investigates the dynamic complementary relationship between two practices, medicine and dance, through the lens of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurological disease that manifests a range of movement disorders. "Dance for PD" is an innovative approach to dancing --and to teaching dance --for those challenged by PD. Course format consists of: 1. Weekly Lecture/Seminar Presentation: Partial list of instructors include Ms. Frank, Dr. Bronte-Stewart and other Stanford medical experts & research scientists, David Leventhal (Director, "Dance for PD") and Bay Area "Dance for PD" certified master teachers, film-maker Dave Iverson, Damara Ganley, and acclaimed choreographers Joe Goode, Alex Ketley, Judith Smith (AXIS Dance). 2. Weekly Dance Class: Stanford students will fully participate as dancers, and creative partners, in the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center's ongoing "Dance for Parkinson's" community dance class for people with PD. This Community Engaged Learning component provides opportunity to engage meaningfully with people in the PD community. Dancing together weekly, students will experience firsthand the embodied signature values of "Dance for PD" classes: full inclusion, embodied presence, aesthetic and expressive opportunity for creative engagement, and community-building in action. A weekly debriefing session within Friday's class time will allow students to integrate seminar material with their movement experiences.nnNO PRE-REQUISITES: No prior dance experience required. Beginners are welcome.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ORALCOMM 129: Sound Stories

This special seminar is designed for students interested in creating stories for radio, podcast, and other sound media. Students will learn both the core principles of telling strong stories, whatever the medium, and the strategies of telling entertaining, persuasive stories for the ear. Just like film or the novel, sonic stories offer a fascinating mix of constraints and opportunities, and you¿ll learn how to invite listeners into an experience or insight that combines theories, facts and feelings into a single space of empathy. This is a hybrid class¿equal parts classic seminar and creative workshop¿and students will create stories from start to finish and learn skills from pitching and interviewing to writing, editing, and digital production. Students will work in small groups to document places through the stories that inhabit them. Recommended for students interested in creative nonfiction, documentary, film, and even sound art. No prior experience necessary. nCardinal Course/CEL/HAAS
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ORALCOMM 130: ORALCOMM: Your American Life

This small seminar is designed for students interested in creating audio stories for radio or podcast. You will examine the craft elements of the medium, popularized by programs like This American Life, Radiolab and Serial, and then produce your own documentary, memoir, or investigative story. We will explore the basic principles of strong storytelling, and you will learn how to develop your material, choose an effective structure, blend dramatization and reflection, ground insights in concrete scenes, create a strong narrative arc, and manage elements such as characterization, description, and dialogue. We will also examine craft elements unique to the audio form, and you will learn skills for interviewing, scoring, and audio editing. Students will have the opportunity to work with special guests from some of the best narrative podcasts in America. No prior experience with story craft or media required. Cardinal Course/CEL/HAAS
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Warga, J. (PI)

OSPFLOR 32: Critical Strategies in Contemporary Photographic Practice: Florence Through a Lens

Technical knowledge and the evolved analytical and conceptual skills required to begin producing complex, reflexive, innovative and challenging photographic work. Workings of the camera, classical rules of aesthetic creation and the nature of light. History of the medium and its relationship to society as a whole. Ethical issues at the heart of photographic practice; examination of the scientific and philosophical foundations of photography itself.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Bennet, N. (PI)

OSPFLOR 41: The Florentine Sketchbook: A Visual Arts Practicum

The ever-changing and multifaceted scene of contemporary art through visual and sensorial stimulation. How art is thought of and produced in Italy today. Hands-on experience. Sketching and exercises on-site at museums and exhibits, plus workshops on techniques. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Rossi, F. (PI)

OSPFLOR 69: Abstract Art: Creativity, Self-Expression and Depicting the Unimaginable

Overview of the birth and evolution of abstract art with visual background necessary to produce works of art free of a realistic representation. Movements and trends in abstract art; experimentation with different media and techniques. Enrollment limited.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Rossi, F. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints