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241 - 250 of 492 results for: all courses

FRENCH 285: Texts and Contexts: French-English Translation (COMPLIT 285, CSRE 285, FRENCH 185)

This course introduces students to the ways in which translation has shaped the image of France and the Francophone world. What texts and concepts were translated, how, where, and to what effect? Students will work on a translation project throughout the quarter and translate texts from French to English and English to French. Topics may include the role of translation in the development of cultures; the political dimension of translation, translation in the context of migration, and the socio-cultural frameworks that shape translations. Case studies: Camus, Fanon, Glissant, de Beauvoir, Meddeb, Duras. Prior knowledge of French language required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

GERMAN 120B: Fairy Tales

In this course, we will explore the fairy tale genre both from a systematic and historical perspective. We will start by asking how fairy tales differ from other short prose texts like legends and fables. We will then focus on bigger themes, allowing us to discern differences within this literary form, namely: the fantastic and the real, motif constancy and variation, narration and orality, animality and the human. Over the course of the seminar, we will not only delve into the world-famous folk tale collection of the Grimm brothers, but also the more stylized Romantic "Kunstmärchen" tradition (Goethe, Brentano, Hoffmann). Examples from the later 19th-century (Keller, Storm) and the 20th century (Hofmannsthal, Kafka, Döblin, Bachmann) demonstrate attempts to reformulate the fairy tale tradition by transgressing its boundaries. Taught in German. Prerequisite: GERLANG 3 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

HISTORY 200B: Doing Environmental History: Climate Change... the podcast

This will be a hands-on course that will emphasize how to do environmental history. Students will reflect on what it means to think historically about a pressing contemporary problem--climate change. We will ask historical questions, produce historical knowledge, and as a critical part of the course, present that knowledge to a general audience in the form of a podcast. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wolfe, M. (PI)

HISTORY 201D: History Goes Pop! Songwriting the Past (HISTORY 301D)

Historical research doesn't always take the form of a thesis, an article, or a book. Sometimes, research leads to film, museum exhibits, works of art, or... music. In this class, students will collaborate to write, record, and produce original pop music (perhaps even an entire album) based on original research in Stanford's wealth of archives and Special Collections. Background in music is NOT required.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 111Q: Texts and Contexts: Spanish/English Literary Translation Workshop (COMPLIT 111Q, DLCL 111Q)

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English and English to Spanish. Students will workshop and revise a translation project throughout the quarter. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies, and semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translation in the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological and socio-cultural forces that shape translations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 113Q: Borges and Translation (DLCL 113Q)

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 241: Fiction Workshop in Spanish

Spanish and Spanish American short stories approached through narrative theory and craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of fiction (e.g. character and plot development, point of view, creating a scene, etc.). Students will write, workshop, and revise an original short story throughout the term. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Readings may include works by Ayala, Bolaño, Borges, Clarín, Cortázar, García Márquez, Piglia, Rodoreda, and others. Enrollment limited.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 242: Poetry Workshop in Spanish

Latin American and Spanish poetry approached through elements of craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of poetry (meter, rhythm, lineation, rhetorical figures and tropes) and the exploration of lyric subgenres (e.g. ode, elegy, prose poem). Students write original poems throughout the quarter. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ITALIAN 154E: Film & Philosophy CE (FRENCH 154E, PHIL 193E, PHIL 293E)

Issues of authenticity, morality, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Blade Runner (Scott), Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), Fight Club (Fincher), La Jetée (Marker), Memento (Nolan), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English. Satisfies the WAY CE.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ITALIC 92: Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Art Worlds: Conversations between Artists and Scholars

ITALIC 92, Art Worlds: Conversations between Artists and Scholars. This course is built around a series of conversations between nine scholar/critic and artist pairs. We will be entering the conversation in media res, as it were, since all of these pairs have histories together; they've had studio visits, late-night phone calls, email and text conversations. Usually the scholar has written about the artist and maybe the artist has suggested reading and viewing lists to the scholar. They've helped each other feel seen, and often be seen in a more literal way.The conversations will concentrate on these questions: How do artists and scholars work across the divide between practice and theory? How should you build your art world and who will be in it? The pairs will discuss their respective practices (art-making, writing, researching, community-building) and engage in conversation about the artist's work. In advance of each conversation, students will read about something written by the scholar/critic about the artist. Each artist will also design a short art-making prompt for enrolled students to complete and share through the course website. Students will share their artworks weekly in small critique groups.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-CE
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