2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

171 - 180 of 374 results for: all courses

FRENCH 192: Women in French Cinema: 1958- (FEMGEN 192, FILMSTUD 112)

Women as objects and subjects of the voyeuristic gaze inherent to cinema. The myth of the feminine idol in French films in historical and cultural context since the New Wave until now. The mythology of stars as the imaginary vehicle that helped France to change from traditional society to modern, culturally mixed nation. The evolution of female characters, roles, actresses, directors in the film industry. Filmmakers include Vadim, Buñuel, Truffaut, Varda, Godard, Colline Serreau, Tonie Marshall. Discussion in English; films in French with English subtitles. 3 units, 4 units or 5 units. Class meets Tuesday/Thursday 1:30-2:50pm; film screenings Monday 6:00-8:30pm. NOTE: FILMSTUD students must take this course for 3 units only.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Alduy, C. (PI)

FRENCH 266: Food, Text, Music: A Multidisciplinary Lab on the Art of Feasting (FRENCH 166, FRENCH 366, MUSIC 133, MUSIC 333)

Students cook a collection of unfamiliar recipes each week while learning about the cultural milieus in which they originated. The course focuses on the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, a time of great banquets that brought together chefs, visual artists, poets, musicians, and dancers. Students read late-medieval cookbooks under the guidance of professional chefs, learn songs and poetry with the help of visiting performers, and delve into a burgeoning scholarly literature on food history and sensory experience. We will also study trade routes and food networks, the environmental impact of large-scale banquets, the science of food, and the politics of plenty. This course may count towards the Medieval component of the French major, and corresponds to DLCL 121, a course requirement for the Medieval Studies Minor. Students interested in applying for course must email both professors (mgalvez@stanford.edu, jrodin@stanford.edu) by 30 November with a statement of up to 350 words that includes: (a) reasons for wanting to take the class; (b) relevant background in cooking/medieval studies/etc.; (c) stated commitment to attend all ten course meetings; and (d) any dietary restrictions/preferences.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ILAC 111Q: Texts and Contexts: Spanish/English Literary Translation Workshop (DLCL 111Q)

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English and English to Spanish. Students will workshop and revise a translation project throughout the quarter. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies, and semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translation in the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological and socio-cultural forces that shape translations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 113Q: Borges and Translation (DLCL 113Q)

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 241: Fiction Workshop in Spanish

Spanish and Spanish American short stories approached through narrative theory and craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of fiction (e.g. character and plot development, point of view, creating a scene, etc.). Students will write, workshop, and revise an original short story throughout the term. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Readings may include works by Ayala, Bolaño, Borges, Clarín, Cortázar, García Márquez, Piglia, Rodoreda, and others. Enrollment limited.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 242: Poetry Workshop in Spanish

Latin American and Spanish poetry approached through elements of craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of poetry (meter, rhythm, lineation, rhetorical figures and tropes) and the exploration of lyric subgenres (e.g. ode, elegy, prose poem). Students write original poems throughout the quarter. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ITALIAN 154E: Film & Philosophy CE (COMPLIT 154E, FRENCH 154E, PHIL 193E, PHIL 293E)

Issues of authenticity, morality, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Blade Runner (Scott), Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), Fight Club (Fincher), La Jetée (Marker), Memento (Nolan), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English. Satisfies the WAY CE.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ITALIC 93: Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Challenging

Challenging, is the third part of ITALIC, a year-long course that explores the ways people make and encounter a wide range of artworks, including music and performance, the visual arts, literature, film and other media. How does art contest cultural, political, and social assumptions and values? How does it challenge expectations about its form, medium, or content? Why are some art works difficult? How can we tell when art becomes something else, such as propaganda or marketing? To address these questions we will read work by Michel Foucault, Laura Mulvey, Edward Said, Mikhail Bakhtin, and Buckminster Fuller, among others. We will have the unique opportunity to attend a performance by Meredith Monk, as well as other art experiences (TBD) in the Bay Area. The course continues to enrich its academic endeavors with art-making opportunities in section and in a two-week filmmaking practicum with Adam Tobin. The quarter, and the year, culminates in a three-day field trip to Los Angeles where we will attend a music and/or theatrical performance (TBD), visit the Getty Center, the Broad Art Museum, and Watts Towers, among other important art sites.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JEWISHST 147B: The Hebrew and Jewish Short Story (COMPLIT 127B)

Short stories from Israel, the US and Europe including works by Agnon, Kafka, Keret, Castel-Bloom, Kashua, Singer, Benjamin, Freud, biblical myths and more. The class will engage with questions related to the short story as a literary form and the history of the short story. Reading and discussion in English. Optional: special section with readings and discussions in Hebrew. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LIFE 101: Tools for a Meaningful Life

Explores the foundational skills for a meaningful life. Features lectures by faculty from across the university and labs for experiential practice. Draws on research and practices from fields related to psychology, philosophy, literature, and neuroscience, as well as wisdom traditions from around the world. Focuses on developing human capacities necessary for a meaningful life including; attention, courage, devotion, resilience, imagination, and gratitude. Exposure to these capacities influences personal growth and its development in communities.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints