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151 - 160 of 867 results for: all courses

CLASSICS 82: The Egyptians (AFRICAAM 30, HISTORY 48, HISTORY 148)

Overview of ancient Egyptian pasts, from predynastic times to Greco-Roman rule, roughly 3000 BCE to 30 BCE. Attention to archaeological sites and artifacts; workings of society; and cultural productions, both artistic and literary. Participation in class is required.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 83: The Greeks (HISTORY 101)

250 years ago, for almost the first time in history, a few societies rejected kings who claimed to know what the gods wanted and began moving toward democracy. Only once before had this happened--in ancient Greece. This course asks how the Greeks did this, and what they can teach us today. It uses texts and archaeology to trace the material and military sides of the story as well as cultural developments, and looks at Greek slavery and misogyny as well as their achievements. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 84: The Romans (HISTORY 102A)

How did a tiny village create a huge empire and shape the world, and why did it fail? Roman history, imperialism, politics, social life, economic growth, and religious change. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required; enroll in sections on Coursework.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 154: Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Maritime Archaeology of the Ancient Mediterranean (ARCHLGY 145)

(Formerly CLASSART 145.) Why do we care about shipwrecks? What can sunken sites and abandoned ports tell us about our past? Focusing primarily on the archaeological record of shipwrecks and harbors, along with literary evidence and contemporary theory, this course examines how and why ancient mariners ventured across the "wine-dark seas" of the Mediterranean for travel, warfare, pilgrimage, and especially commerce. We will explore interdisciplinary approaches to the development of maritime contacts and communication from the Bronze Age through the end of Roman era. At the same time, we will engage with practical techniques of maritime archaeology, which allows us to explore the material record first hand.
Terms: given next year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CLASSICS 164: Roman Gladiators (ARCHLGY 165)

In modern America, gladiators are powerful representatives of ancient Rome (Spartacus, Gladiator). In the Roman world, gladiators were mostly slaves and reviled, barred from certain positions in society and doomed to short and dangerous lives. A first goal of this course is to analyze Roman society not from the top down, from the perspective of politicians, generals and the literary elite, but from the bottom up, from the perspective of gladiators and the ordinary people in the stands. A second goal is to learn how work with very different kinds of evidence: bone injuries, ancient weapons, gladiator burials, laws, graffiti written by gladiators or their fans, visual images of gladiatorial combats, and the intricate architecture and social control of the amphitheater. A final goal is to think critically about modern ideas of Roman ¿bloodthirst.¿ Are these ideas justified, given the ancient evidence?
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 1B: Media, Culture, and Society (AMSTUD 1B)

The institutions and practices of mass media, including television, film, radio, and digital media, and their role in shaping culture and social life. The media's shifting relationships to politics, commerce, and identity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Turner, F. (PI)

COMM 108: Media Processes and Effects (COMM 208)

(Graduate students register for COMM 208.) The process of communication theory construction including a survey of social science paradigms and major theories of communication. Recommended: 1 or PSYCH 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 120W: Digital Media in Society (AMSTUD 120, COMM 220)

Contemporary debates concerning the social and cultural impact of digital media. Topics include the historical origins of digital media, cultural contexts of their development and use, and influence of digital media on conceptions of self, community, and state. Priority to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Turner, F. (PI)

COMM 124: Lies, Trust, and Tech (COMM 224)

Deception is one of the most significant and pervasive social phenomena of our age. Lies range from the trivial to the very serious, including deception between friends and family, in the workplace, and in security and intelligence contexts. At the same time, information and communication technologies have pervaded almost all aspects of human communication, from everyday technologies that support interpersonal interactions to, such as email and instant messaging, to more sophisticated systems that support organization-level interactions. Given the prevalence of both deception and communication technology in our personal and professional lives, an important set of questions have recently emerged about how humans adapt their deceptive practices to new communication and information technologies, including how communication technology affects the practice of lying and the detection of deception, and whether technology can be used to identify deception.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hancock, J. (PI)

COMM 125: Perspectives on American Journalism (AMSTUD 125, COMM 225)

An examination of American journalism, focusing on how news is produced, distributed, and financially supported. Emphasis on current media controversies and puzzles, and on designing innovations in discovering and telling stories. (Graduate students register for COMM 225.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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