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141 - 150 of 915 results for: all courses

CHINA 152: Gods, Ghosts, and Ancestors: Anthropology of Chinese Folk Religion (CHINA 252)

Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 155A: Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China (ANTHRO 148, ANTHRO 248, CHINA 255A)

One of the most generative regions for medical anthropology inquiry in recent years has been Asia. This seminar is designed to introduce upper division undergraduates and graduate students to the methodological hurdles, representational challenges, and intellectual rewards of investigating the intersections of health, politics, and culture in contemporary China.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 156: Sino-Korean Relations, Past and Present (CHINA 256, HISTORY 292J, KOREA 156, KOREA 256)

Korea and China have long been intertwined in their political, economic, and cultural histories. The depth of this historical relationship has enormous ramifications for East Asia today. This course will investigate the history of Korea-China relations from its deep roots in the ancient past, through its formative periods in the early modern period and the age of imperialism, to the contemporary era. Topics to be covered include formation of Chinese and Korean national identity, Sino-Korean cultural exchange, premodern Chinese empire in East Asia, China and Korea in the wake of Western and Japanese imperialism, communist revolutions in East Asia, the Korean War, and China's relations with a divided Korea in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Particular attention will be paid to how the modern and contemporary ramifications of past historical relations and how contemporary Chinese and Koreans interpret their own and each others' pasts.nThis course will ask students to engage with more »
Korea and China have long been intertwined in their political, economic, and cultural histories. The depth of this historical relationship has enormous ramifications for East Asia today. This course will investigate the history of Korea-China relations from its deep roots in the ancient past, through its formative periods in the early modern period and the age of imperialism, to the contemporary era. Topics to be covered include formation of Chinese and Korean national identity, Sino-Korean cultural exchange, premodern Chinese empire in East Asia, China and Korea in the wake of Western and Japanese imperialism, communist revolutions in East Asia, the Korean War, and China's relations with a divided Korea in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Particular attention will be paid to how the modern and contemporary ramifications of past historical relations and how contemporary Chinese and Koreans interpret their own and each others' pasts.nThis course will ask students to engage with diverse interpretations of the past and to consider how a common history is interpreted by different audiences and for different purposes. What are the implications of divergent memories of a single historical event for Chinese and Korean political, cultural, and ethnic identities? How are political, cultural, and ethnic identities constructed through engagement with difference? And what is at stake in different constructions of identity?In addressing these issues, students will also engage in social inquiry. They will be asked to understand how political ideology, economic organization, and social forces have shaped the character of Sino-Korean relations. What are the economic and political institutions that influence these relations in each time period? How do ideologies like Confucianism, Communism, or free-market liberalism interface with Chinese and Korean societies and impact their relations?
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wang, S. (PI)

CHINA 164: Classical Chinese Rituals (CHINA 264)

Meanings of rituals regarding death, wedding, war, and other activities; historical transformations of classical rituals throughout the premodern period; legacy of the Chinese ritual tradition. Sources include canonical texts.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 168: The Chinese Family (CHINA 268)

History and literature. Institutional, ritual, affective, and symbolic aspects. Perspectives of gender, class, and social change.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 170: Chinese Language, Culture, and Society

Functions of languages in Chinese culture and society, origin of the Chinese language, genetic relations with neighboring languages, development of dialects, language contacts, evolution of Chinese writing, language policies in Greater China. Prerequisite: one quarter of Chinese 1 or 1B or equivalent recommended.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHINA 175: Constructing National History in East Asian Archaeology (ARCHLGY 135, ARCHLGY 235, CHINA 275)

Archaeological studies in contemporary East Asia share a common concern, to contribute to building a national narrative and cultural identity. This course focuses on case studies from China, Korea, and Japan, examining the influence of particular social-political contexts, such as nationalism, on the practice of archaeology in modern times.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Liu, L. (PI)

CHINA 176: Emergence of Chinese Civilization from Caves to Palaces (ARCHLGY 111, CHINA 276)

Introduces processes of cultural evolution from the Paleolithic to the Three Dynasties in China. By examining archaeological remains, ancient inscriptions, and traditional texts, four major topics will be discussed: origins of modern humans, beginnings of agriculture, development of social stratification, and emergence of states and urbanism.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Liu, L. (PI)

CHINA 178: Lives of Confucius (CHINA 278)

This course examines the transformation of the images of Confucius (551-479 BCE) from his own time to the present day. Major topics include: Confucius and his rivals / critics, the making of Confucius the "Uncrowned King," his apotheosis as China's cultural symbol and civilization's greatest sage, and twists and turns in his modern fate. Comparisons will be made with the development of images of Socrates, Jesus, and other important cultural figures. NOTE: In order for course to count towards major or minor, undergrads must enroll in a minimum of 3 units or higher.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Zhou, Y. (PI)

CLASSICS 9N: What Didn't Make it into the Bible (JEWISHST 9N, RELIGST 9N)

Over two billion people alive today consider the Bible to be sacred scripture. But how did the books that made it into the bible get there in the first place? Who decided what was to be part of the bible and what wasn't? How would history look differently if a given book didn't make the final cut and another one did? Hundreds of ancient Jewish and Christian texts are not included in the Bible. ¿What Didn't Make It in the Bible¿ focuses on these excluded writings. We will explore the Dead Sea Scrolls, Gnostic gospels, hear of a five-year-old Jesus throwing temper tantrums while killing (and later resurrecting) his classmates, peruse ancient romance novels, explore the adventures of fallen angels who sired giants (and taught humans about cosmetics), tour heaven and hell, encounter the garden of Eden story told from the perspective of the snake, and learn how the world will end. The seminar assumes no prior knowledge of Judaism, Christianity, the bible, or ancient history. It is designed more »
Over two billion people alive today consider the Bible to be sacred scripture. But how did the books that made it into the bible get there in the first place? Who decided what was to be part of the bible and what wasn't? How would history look differently if a given book didn't make the final cut and another one did? Hundreds of ancient Jewish and Christian texts are not included in the Bible. ¿What Didn't Make It in the Bible¿ focuses on these excluded writings. We will explore the Dead Sea Scrolls, Gnostic gospels, hear of a five-year-old Jesus throwing temper tantrums while killing (and later resurrecting) his classmates, peruse ancient romance novels, explore the adventures of fallen angels who sired giants (and taught humans about cosmetics), tour heaven and hell, encounter the garden of Eden story told from the perspective of the snake, and learn how the world will end. The seminar assumes no prior knowledge of Judaism, Christianity, the bible, or ancient history. It is designed for students who are part of faith traditions that consider the bible to be sacred, as well as those who are not. The only prerequisite is an interest in exploring books, groups, and ideas that eventually lost the battles of history and to keep asking the question "why." In critically examining these ancient narratives and the communities that wrote them, you will learn about the content and history of the Bible, better appreciate the diversity of early Judaism and Christianity, understand the historical context of these religions, and explore the politics behind what did and did not make it into the bible.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Penn, M. (PI)
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