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101 - 110 of 154 results for: all courses

ENGR 90: Environmental Science and Technology (CEE 70)

Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kopperud, R. (PI)

ENGR 105: Feedback Control Design

Design of linear feedback control systems for command-following error, stability, and dynamic response specifications. Root-locus and frequency response design techniques. Examples from a variety of fields. Some use of computer aided design with MATLAB. Prerequisites: Dynamics systems ( EE 102B or ME 161), and ordinary differential equations ( CME 102 or Math 53)
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Okamura, A. (PI)

ENGR 120: Fundamentals of Petroleum Engineering (ENERGY 120)

Lectures, problems, field trip. Engineering topics in petroleum recovery; origin, discovery, and development of oil and gas. Chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of oil and natural gas. Material balance equations and reserve estimates using volumetric calculations. Gas laws. Single phase and multiphase flow through porous media.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 60N: Man versus Nature: Coping with Disasters Using Space Technology (EE 60N)

Preference to freshman. Natural hazards, earthquakes, volcanoes, floods, hurricanes, and fires, and how they affect people and society; great disasters such as asteroid impacts that periodically obliterate many species of life. Scientific issues, political and social consequences, costs of disaster mitigation, and how scientific knowledge affects policy. How spaceborne imaging technology makes it possible to respond quickly and mitigate consequences; how it is applied to natural disasters; and remote sensing data manipulation and analysis. GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2018 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 90: Earthquakes and Volcanoes (EARTHSYS 113)

Is the "Big One" overdue in California? What kind of damage would that cause? What can we do to reduce the impact of such hazards in urban environments? Does "fracking" cause earthquakes and are we at risk? Is the United States vulnerable to a giant tsunami? The geologic record contains evidence of volcanic super eruptions throughout Earth's history. What causes these gigantic explosive eruptions, and can they be predicted in the future? This course will address these and related issues. For non-majors and potential Earth scientists. No prerequisites. More information at: https://stanford.box.com/s/zr8ar28efmuo5wtlj6gj2jbxle76r4lu
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 190: Near-Surface Geophysics

Introduction to geophysical methods that can be used for imaging and characterizing groundwater systems; modeling and interpretation of the data. This Cardinal Class will be structured around solving a problem currently faced by a community in the Central Valley of California: How to select a site that can be used to recharge the groundwater? Where is there sand and gravel? clay? Where will the water go? We will review data from the area and develop a plan for the acquisition of geophysical data to image sediment texture in the subsurface. Data will be acquired during a weekend field trip to the community. Each week includes two hours of lectures; plus one 1.5-hour lab that involves acquisition of field data, or computer modeling/analysis of datanPre-requisite: CME 100 or Math 51, or co-registration in either.n(Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 183: Programming and Algorithms for Natural Language Processing

Construction of computer programs for linguistic processes such as string search, morphological, syntactic, and semantic analysis and generation, and simple machine translation. Emphasis is on the algorithms that have proved most useful for solving such problems.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 114: Introduction to Scientific Computing (CME 108)

Introduction to Scientific Computing Numerical computation for mathematical, computational, physical sciences and engineering: error analysis, floating-point arithmetic, nonlinear equations, numerical solution of systems of algebraic equations, banded matrices, least squares, unconstrained optimization, polynomial interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, truncation error, numerical stability for time dependent problems and stiffness. Implementation of numerical methods in MATLAB programming assignments. Prerequisites: MATH 51, 52, 53; prior programming experience (MATLAB or other language at level of CS 106A or higher).
Terms: not given this year, last offered Summer 2019 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 81N: Bioengineering Materials to Heal the Body

Preference to freshmen. Real-world examples of materials developed for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine therapies. How scientists and engineers design new materials for surgeons to use in replacing body parts such as damaged heart or spinal cord tissue. How cells interact with implanted materials. Students identify a clinically important disease or injury that requires a better material, proposed research approaches to the problem, and debate possible engineering solutions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 142: Quantum Mechanics of Nanoscale Materials

Introduction to quantum mechanics and its application to the properties of materials. No prior background beyond a working knowledge of calculus and high school physics is presumed. Topics include: The Schrodinger equation and applications to understanding of the properties of quantum dots, semiconductor heterostructures, nanowires, and bulk solids. Tunneling processes and applications to nanoscale devices; the scanning tunneling microscope, and quantum cascade lasers. Simple models for the electronic properties and band structure of materials including semiconductors, insulators and metals and applications to semiconductor devices. Time-dependent perturbation theory and interaction of light with materials with applications to laser technology. Recommended: ENGR 50 or equivalent introductory materials science course. (Formerly 157)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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