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AFRICAAM 20A: Jazz Theory (MUSIC 20A)

Introduces the language and sounds of jazz through listening, analysis, and compositional exercises. Students apply the fundamentals of music theory to the study of jazz. Prerequisite: 19 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Nadel, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 37: Chocolate Heads Performance Project: Dance & Intercultural Performance Creation (DANCE 30)

Students from diverse dance styles (ballet to hip-hop to contemporary) participate in the dance-making/remix process and collaborate with musicians, visual artists, designers and spoken word artists, to co-create a multidisciplinary finished production and installation. Students of all dance or athletic backgrounds are welcome to audition on Wednesday (9/26) and Monday (10/1) during class time. Visual artists, musicians and dancers may also contact the instructor for further information at ahayes1@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 45: Dance Improv StratLab: Freestyle Improvisation from Contemporary to Hip Hop & Beyond (DANCE 45)

This class is an arena for physical and artistic exploration to fire the imagination of dance improvisers, cultivate sensation and perception within and without studio practice and to promote interactive intelligence.nStudents will learn to harness and transform habitual movement patterns and dance trainings as resources for new ways of moving: expand their awareness of being a part of a bigger picture, while being attentive to everything all at once: and to use visual, aural and kinesthetic responses to convert those impulses into artistic material. Class will be accompanied by live and recorded music and include weekly jam sessions. Open to students from all dance, movement, athletic backgrounds and skill levels. Beginners welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 156: Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson (CSRE 156T, TAPS 156, TAPS 356)

This course purposefully and explicitly mixes theory and practice. Students will read and discuss the plays of August Wilson, the most celebrated and most produced contemporary American playwright, that comprise his 20th Century History Cycle. Class stages scenes from each of these plays, culminating in a final showcase of longer scenes from his work as a final project.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AMSTUD 48N: The American Songbook and Love Poetry (ENGLISH 48N)

A study of performances (Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra etc) of songs by classic American composers (Porter, Rogers and Hart, Cohen).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Fields, K. (PI)

AMSTUD 91A: ASIAN-AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY/W (ASNAMST 91A, CSRE 91D, ENGLISH 91A)

This is a dual purpose class: a writing workshop in which you will generate autobiographical vignettes/essays as well as a reading seminar featuring prose from a wide range of contemporary Asian-American writers. Some of the many questions we will consider are: What exactly is Asian-American memoir? Are there salient subjects and tropes that define the literature? And in what ways do our writerly interactions both resistant and assimilative with a predominantly non-Asian context in turn recreate that context? We'll be working/experimenting with various modes of telling, including personal essay, the epistolary form, verse, and even fictional scenarios. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lee, C. (PI)

AMSTUD 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B, CSRE 134, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AMSTUD 151F: Angelheaded Hipsters: Beat Writers of San Francisco and New York (ENGLISH 151F)

Reading of central writers of the Beat movement (Ginsberg, Kerouac, di Prima, Snyder, Whalen) as well as some related writers (Creeley, Gunn, Levertov). Issues explored include NY and SF, Buddhism and leftist politics, poetry and jazz. Some exposure to reading poems to jazz accompaniment. Examination of some of the writers and performers growing out of the Beats: Bob Dylan, rock music, especially from San Francisco, and jazz.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fields, K. (PI)

AMSTUD 176B: Documentary Fictions

More and more of the best American fiction, plays, and even comics are being created out of documentary practices such as in-depth interviewing, oral histories, and reporting. Novels like Dave Egger¿s What is the What, plays like Anna Deavere Smith's Twilight Los Angeles, and narrative journalism like Rebecca Skloot's The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, all act as both witnesses and translators of people's direct experience and push art into social activism in new ways. In this course students will examine the research methods, artistic craft, and ethics of these rich, genre-bending works and then create documentary fictions of their own. Readings will include works by Katherine Boo, G. B. Tran, and Charles Johnson, and author visits will include a master class with Rebecca Skloot. No prior creative writing or journalism experience required.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANES 72Q: The Art of Medical Diagnosis

The Art of Medical Diagnosis: Enhancing Observational Skills through the Study of Art is an interactive, multidisciplinary undergraduate course that explores various ways in which studying art increases critical observational skills vital for aspiring health care providers. Students will be introduced to the concept of `Visual Thinking Strategies¿ through classroom, art creation, and museum based activities. Students will apply these skills to both works of art and medical cases. Significant focus will be on engaging in group discussions where they will collaboratively use visual evidence to generate and defend hypothesis. Drawing and sketching from life will play a critical role in honing observational skills through weekly assignments, workshops, and a final project. The interactive nature of this course pivots students away from a typical lecture based course to a self-directed learning experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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