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251 - 260 of 267 results for: all courses

PSYC 135: Sleep and Dreams (PSYC 235)

Dr. William Dement created Sleep and Dreams in 1971, the world¿s first university undergraduate-level course on the science of sleep. Now as an emeritus professor, he continues to be actively involved in the course teaching many of the lectures and sometimes driving students to class in his golf cart! The course is designed to impart essential knowledge of the neuroscience of sleep and covers how sleep affects our daily lives. The course covers normal sleep and dreams, as well as common sleep disorders. Course content empowers students to make educated decisions concerning sleep and alertness for the rest of their lives and shapes students' attitudes about the importance of sleep. Students will keep track of their sleep patterns during the course. They will also participate in an outreach project to help improve awareness of the importance of sleep heath in our community. Undergraduates must enroll in PSYC 135, while graduate students should enroll in PSYC 235.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYCH 1: Introduction to Psychology

An introduction to the science of how people think, feel, and behave. We will explore such topics as intelligence, perception, memory, happiness, personality, culture, social influence, development, emotion, and mental illness. Students will learn about classic and cutting edge research, a range of methods, and discover how psychology informs our understanding of what it means to be human, addresses other fields, and offers solutions to important social problems. Psych 1 fulfills the SI Way, and, effective Autumn 2018, the SMA Way. For more information on PSYCH 1, visit http://psychone.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 9N: Reading the Brain: the Scientific, Ethical, and Legal Implications of Brain Imaging

It's hard to pick up a newspaper without seeing a story that involves brain imaging, from research on psychological disorders to its use for lie detection or "neuromarketing". The methods are indeed very powerful, but many of the claims seen in the press are results of overly strong interpretations. In this course, you will learn to evaluate claims based on brain imaging research. We will also explore the deeper ethical and philosophical issues that arise from our ability to peer into our own brains in action. The course will start by discussing how to understand and interpret the findings of brain imaging research. We will discuss how new statistical methods provide the ability to accurately predict thoughts and behaviors from brain images. We will explore how this research has the potential to change our concepts of the self, personal responsibility and free will. We will also discuss the ethics of brain imaging, such as how the ability to detect thoughts relates to personal privacy and mental illness. Finally, we will discuss the legal implications of these techniques, such as their use in lie detection or as evidence against legal culpability.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 16N: Amines and Affect

Preference to freshmen. How serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine influence people's emotional lives. This course is ideal for students that would like to get deeper exposure to cutting edge concepts and methods at the intersection of psychology and biology, and who plan to apply their knowledge to future research.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 30: Introduction to Perception

Behavioral and neural aspects of perception focusing on visual and auditory perception. Topics include: scientific methods for studying perception, anatomy and physiology of the visual and auditiory systems, color vision, depth perception, motion perception, stereopsis, visual recognition, pitch and loudness perception, speech perception, and reorganization of the visual system in the blind.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 50: Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience

Survey of topics relating brain activity to cognitive processes and behavior. The course begins with an overview of neurophysiology and techniques to measure brain activity. We then discuss perceptual and motor processes before investigating neural responses related to attention, memory, and cognitive control. The course concludes with a discussion of brain processes related to reward, decision making, and social cognition.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 120: Cellular Neuroscience: Cell Signaling and Behavior (BIO 153)

Neural interactions underlying behavior. Prerequisites: PSYCH 1 or basic biology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 121: Ion Transport and Intracellular Messengers (PSYCH 228)

(Graduate students register for 228.) Ion channels, carriers, ion pumps, and their regulation by intracellular messengers in a variety of cell types. Recommended: 120, introductory course in biology or human biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wine, J. (PI)

PSYCH 164: Brain decoding

Can we know what someone is thinking by examining their brain activity? Using knowledge of the human visual system and techniques from machine learning, recent work has shown impressive ability to decode what people are looking at from their brain activity as measured with functional imaging. The course will use a combination of lectures, primary literature readings, discussion and hands-on tutorials to understand this emerging technology from basic knowledge of the perceptual (primarily visual) and other cognitive systems (such as working memory) to tools and techniques used to decode brain activity.nPrerequisites: Either Psych 30 or Psych 50 or Consent of Instructor
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOMGEN 120N: Learning, Motivation & Addiction

How does the brain change when you remember information, pick up a skill or acquire a bad habit? How do pain, pleasure and traits like impulsivity and self-control sculpt who we are? We will example the principles of neuroplasticity and their significance for education, mood disorders, and legal and moral responsibility. Through relevant texts from the humanities, analysis of key neuroscientific experiments, and hands-on experimentation, students will build a multifaceted understanding of how the brain works.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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