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241 - 250 of 265 results for: all courses

PHYSICS 107: Intermediate Physics Laboratory II: Experimental Techniques and Data Analysis

Experiments on lasers, Gaussian optics, and atom-light interaction, with emphasis on data and error analysis techniques. Students describe a subset of experiments in scientific paper format. Prerequisites: completion of PHYSICS 40 or PHYSICS 60 series, and PHYSICS 70 and PHYSICS 105. Recommended pre- or corequisites: PHYSICS 120 and 130. WIM
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hollberg, L. (PI)

PHYSICS 108: Advanced Physics Laboratory: Project

Have you ever gotten to come up with a scientific question you'd like to explore, then worked with a small group to plan, design, build, and carry out an experiment to pursue this? Most projects pursued (drawn from condensed matter or particle physics) have never before been done in the class. This is an accelerated, guided "simulation" of real frontier experimental research. We provide substantial resources to help your team. Prerequisites PHYSICS 105, PHYSICS 107. PHYSICS 130 preferred.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 110: Advanced Mechanics (PHYSICS 210)

Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics. Principle of least action, Euler-Lagrange equations. Small oscillations and beyond. Symmetries, canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, action-angle variables. Introduction to classical field theory. Selected other topics, including nonlinear dynamical systems, attractors, chaotic motion. Undergraduates register for Physics 110 (4 units). Graduates register for Physics 210 (3 units). Prerequisites: MATH 131P or PHYSICS 111, and PHYSICS 112 or MATH elective 104 or higher. Recommended prerequisite: PHYSICS 130.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 120: Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism I

Vector analysis. Electrostatic fields, including boundary-value problems and multipole expansion. Dielectrics, static and variable magnetic fields, magnetic materials. Maxwell's equations. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 43 or PHYS 63; MATH 52 and MATH 53. Pre- or corequisite: PHYS 111, MATH 131P or MATH 173. Recommended corequisite: PHYS 112.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hogan, J. (PI)

PHYSICS 130: Quantum Mechanics I

The origins of quantum mechanics and wave mechanics. Schrödinger equation and solutions for one-dimensional systems. Commutation relations. Generalized uncertainty principle. Time-energy uncertainty principle. Separation of variables and solutions for three-dimensional systems; application to hydrogen atom. Spherically symmetric potentials and angular momentum eigenstates. Spin angular momentum. Addition of angular momentum. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 65 or PHYSICS 70 and PHYSICS 111 or MATH 131P or MATH 173. MATH 173 can be taken concurrently. Pre- or corequisites: PHYSICS 120.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYC 50Q: Brain Training: Hype or Help?

Focuses on primary literature to evaluate evidence supporting claims that concerted practice can lead to improvements in capacities such as working memory, speed of processing and IQ. Looks across lifespan from childhood and remediation of learning disabilities to elderly individuals and the potential for brain training to delay onset of dementia. Examines new research into brain training as treatment for psychiatric disorders, as well as neuroscience behind learning and memory. Considers ethical implications of these programs. Students participate in brain training and track and analyze progress.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYC 54N: Genes, Memes and Behavior

Examines how natural selection operates to shape successful genes in the gene pool, how cultural selection operates to shape successful "memes" in the pool of cultural ideas, and how selection by consequences operates to shape successful behaviors in our repertoires. Topics include cases in which selection produces undesirable consequences (e.g. genetic mutations, cultural problems, and aberrant behaviors in children). Emphasis on understanding the role of modern natural science in complex behaviors and why study of human life from an interdisciplinary perspective is important.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hall, S. (PI)

PSYC 83: Addictions in our World: From Physiology to Human Behavior

Addiction is a powerful brain-based behavioral disorder that interferes with many lives. The National Survey on Drug Use and Health has estimated 21.5 million Americans aged 12 and older are classified as having a substance use disorder, an extraordinary 8.1% of the population. The field of mental health is advancing the understanding of this disorder through research, education, innovation and policy guidance. This class aims to help students better understand the struggles of addiction in our world by discussing many components involved in the disease including: physiology, psychology, treatment options, and the societal implications of addiction.nnStudents will engage in thought-provoking between psychology, neuroscience, and society. They will develop the knowledge-base and framework to critically evaluate the science behind addiction and how to apply this knowledge to address the addiction epidemic in our world. As technology advances, many new types of addiction are emerging, cre more »
Addiction is a powerful brain-based behavioral disorder that interferes with many lives. The National Survey on Drug Use and Health has estimated 21.5 million Americans aged 12 and older are classified as having a substance use disorder, an extraordinary 8.1% of the population. The field of mental health is advancing the understanding of this disorder through research, education, innovation and policy guidance. This class aims to help students better understand the struggles of addiction in our world by discussing many components involved in the disease including: physiology, psychology, treatment options, and the societal implications of addiction.nnStudents will engage in thought-provoking between psychology, neuroscience, and society. They will develop the knowledge-base and framework to critically evaluate the science behind addiction and how to apply this knowledge to address the addiction epidemic in our world. As technology advances, many new types of addiction are emerging, creating an additional urgent need to discuss the implications this burgeoning problem. This highly interactive seminar aims to engage the students in critical thinking didactics, activities and discussions that shape their understanding of the complexity inherent to the issues surrounding addiction, and increase the student¿s ability to more critically assimilate and interrogate information.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 135: Sleep and Dreams (PSYC 235)

Dr. William Dement created Sleep and Dreams in 1971, the world¿s first university undergraduate-level course on the science of sleep. Now as an emeritus professor, he continues to be actively involved in the course teaching many of the lectures and sometimes driving students to class in his golf cart! The course is designed to impart essential knowledge of the neuroscience of sleep and covers how sleep affects our daily lives. The course covers normal sleep and dreams, as well as common sleep disorders. Course content empowers students to make educated decisions concerning sleep and alertness for the rest of their lives and shapes students' attitudes about the importance of sleep. Students will keep track of their sleep patterns during the course. They will also participate in an outreach project to help improve awareness of the importance of sleep heath in our community. Undergraduates must enroll in PSYC 135, while graduate students should enroll in PSYC 235.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYCH 1: Introduction to Psychology

An introduction to the science of how people think, feel, and behave. We will explore such topics as intelligence, perception, memory, happiness, personality, culture, social influence, development, emotion, and mental illness. Students will learn about classic and cutting edge research, a range of methods, and discover how psychology informs our understanding of what it means to be human, addresses other fields, and offers solutions to important social problems. Psych 1 fulfills the SI Way, and, effective Autumn 2018, the SMA Way. For more information on PSYCH 1, visit http://psychone.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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