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171 - 180 of 267 results for: all courses

GEOPHYS 184: Journey to the Center of the Earth (GEOLSCI 107, GEOLSCI 207, GEOPHYS 274)

The interconnected set of dynamic systems that make up the Earth. Focus is on fundamental geophysical observations of the Earth and the laboratory experiments to understand and interpret them. What earthquakes, volcanoes, gravity, magnetic fields, and rocks reveal about the Earth's formation and evolution.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 190: Near-Surface Geophysics

Introduction to geophysical methods that can be used for imaging and characterizing groundwater systems; modeling and interpretation of the data. This Cardinal Class will be structured around solving a problem currently faced by a community in the Central Valley of California: How to select a site that can be used to recharge the groundwater? Where is there sand and gravel? clay? Where will the water go? We will review data from the area and develop a plan for the acquisition of geophysical data to image sediment texture in the subsurface. Data will be acquired during a weekend field trip to the community. Each week includes two hours of lectures; plus one 1.5-hour lab that involves acquisition of field data, or computer modeling/analysis of datanPre-requisite: CME 100 or Math 51, or co-registration in either.n(Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GS 55Q: The California Gold Rush: Geologic Background and Environmental Impact

Preference to sophomores. Topics include: geologic processes that led to the concentration of gold in the river gravels and rocks of the Mother Lode region of California; and environmental impact of the Gold Rush due to population increase, mining operations, and high concentrations of arsenic and mercury in sediments from hard rock mining and milling operations. Recommended: introductory geology.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 2A: Genetics, Evolution, and Ecology

Introduction to the principles of classical and modern genetics, evolutionary theory, and population biology. Topics: micro- and macro-evolution, population and molecular genetics, biodiversity, and ecology, emphasizing the genetics and ecology of the evolutionary process and applications to human populations. HUMBIO 2A and HUMBIO 2B are designed to be taken concurrently and exams for both sides may include material from joint module lectures. Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors in order to meet declaration deadlines. Please note Human Biology majors are required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 2B: Culture, Evolution, and Society

Introduction to the evolutionary study of human diversity. Hominid evolution, the origins of social complexity, social theory, population dynamics, the impact of disease on societies and the emergence of the modern world system, emphasizing the concept of culture and its influence on human differences. HUMBIO 2B, with HUMBIO 3B and HUMBIO 4B, satisfies the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement for students in Human Biology. HUMBIO 2A and HUMBIO 2B are designed to be taken concurrently and exams for both sides may include material from joint module lectures. Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors in order to meet declaration deadlines. Please note Human Biology majors are required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 3A: Cell and Developmental Biology

The principles of the biology of cells: principles of human developmental biology, biochemistry of energetics and metabolism, the nature of membranes and organelles, hormone action and signal transduction in normal and diseased states (diabetes, cancer, autoimmune diseases), drug discovery and immunology. HUMBIO 3A and HUMBIO 3B are designed to be taken concurrently and exams for both sides may include material from joint module lectures. Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors in order to meet declaration deadlines. Please note Human Biology majors are required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade. Prerequisite: college chemistry or completion of the HumBio Core on-line chemistry lecture series during the fall quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 4A: The Human Organism

Integrative Physiology: Neurobiology, endocrinology, and organ system function, control, and regulation. HUMBIO 4A and HUMBIO 4B are designed to be taken concurrently and exams for both sides may include material from joint module lectures. Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors in order to meet declaration deadlines. Please note Human Biology majors are required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 91Q: Neuroethology: The Neural Control of Behavior (BIO 32Q)

Preference to sophomores. Animal behavior offers insights about evolutionary adaptations and this seminar will discuss the origins of the study of animal behavior and its development to the present. How does the nervous system control behavior and how is it changed by behavior? We will analyze and discuss original research papers about the neural basis of behavior. The use and misuse of parallels between animal and human behavior. Possible field trip to observe animals in their natural habitat.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HUMBIO 113: The Human-Plant Connection

The intertwined biologies of humans and plants, particularly the ways in which people and plants have imposed selection pressures and ecological change on one another. Topics include evolution and basic plant structure; plant domestication; effects of agriculture on human health and physiology; plants in traditional and contemporary diets; and human influences on plant biology through genetic manipulation and environmental change. Class meetings center on journal articles. Final project includes written and multimedia presentations. Prerequisites: HumBio 2A or Bio 81 and Bio 82 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Preston, K. (PI)

HUMBIO 130: Human Nutrition (CHPR 130)

The study of food, and the nutrients and substances therein. Their action, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease. Emphasis is on the biological, chemical, and physiological processes by which humans ingest, digest, absorb, transport, utilize, and excrete food. Dietary composition and individual choices are discussed in relationship to the food supply, and to population and cultural, race, ethnic, religious, and social economic diversity. The relationships between nutrition and disease; ethnic diets; vegetarianism; nutritional deficiencies; nutritional supplementation; phytochemicals. HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 130. CHPR master's students must enroll for a letter grade. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Gardner, C. (PI)
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