2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

131 - 140 of 426 results for: all courses

CSRE 255D: Racial Identity in the American Imagination (AFRICAAM 255, AMSTUD 255D, HISTORY 255D, HISTORY 355D)

From Sally Hemings to Barack Obama, this course explores the ways that racial identity has been experienced, represented, and contested throughout American history. Engaging historical, legal, and literary texts and films, this course examines major historical transformations that have shaped our understanding of racial identity. This course also draws on other imaginative modes including autobiography, memoir, photography, and music to consider the ways that racial identity has been represented in American society. Most broadly, this course interrogates the problem of American identity and examines the interplay between racial identity and American identity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hobbs, A. (PI)

CSRE 260: California's Minority-Majority Cities (URBANST 169)

Historical development and the social, cultural, and political issues that characterize large cities and suburbs where communities of color make up majority populations. Case studies include cities in Los Angeles, Santa Clara, and Monterey counties. Comparisons to minority-majority cities elsewhere in the U.S. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: McKibben, C. (PI)

EARTHSYS 21: Peopling of the Globe: Changing Patterns of Land Use and Consumption Over the Last 50,000 Years (ANTHRO 18, HUMBIO 182)

Fossil, genetic and archaeological evidence suggest that modern humans began to disperse out of Africa about 50,000 years ago. Subsequently, humans have colonized every major landmass on earth. This class introduces students to the data and issues regarding human dispersal, migration and colonization of continents and islands around the world. We explore problems related to the timing and cause of colonizing events, and investigate questions about changing patterns of land use, demography and consumption. Students are introduced to critical relationships between prehistoric population changes and our contemporary environmental crisis.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EASTASN 256: 350 Years of America-China Relations (HISTORY 256, HISTORY 356)

The history of turbulent relations, military conflict, and cultural clashes between the U.S. and China, and the implications for the domestic lives of these increasingly interconnected countries. Diplomatic, political, social, cultural, and military themes from early contact to the recent past.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Chang, G. (PI)

ECON 1: Principles of Economics

This is an introductory course in economics. We will cover both microeconomics (investigating decisions by individuals and firms) and macroeconomics (examining the economy as a whole). The primary goal is to develop and then build on your understanding of the analytical tools and approaches used by economists. This will help you to interpret economic news and economic data at a much deeper level while also forming your own opinions on economic issues. The course will also provide a strong foundation for those of you who want to continue on with intermediate microeconomics and/or intermediate macroeconomics and possibly beyond. In Spring 2018-2019 Econ 1 will use all class time for team-based learning instead of lectures; class attendance will be mandatory, and enrollment will be limited to 120 students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 180: Honors Game Theory

Rigorous introduction to game theory and applications. Topics include solution concepts for static and dynamic games of complete and incomplete information, signaling games, repeated games, bargaining, and elements of cooperative game theory. Applications mainly from economics, but also political science, biology, and computer science. Prerequisites: Experience with abstract mathematics and willingness to work hard. No background in economics required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 110: Sociology of Education: The Social Organization of Schools (EDUC 310, SOC 132, SOC 332)

Seminar. Key sociological theories and empirical studies of the links between education and its role in modern society, focusing on frameworks that deal with sources of educational change, the organizational context of schooling, the impact of schooling on social stratification, and the relationships between the educational system and other social institutions such as families, neighborhoods, and the economy.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2013 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 112: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 212, SOC 129X, SOC 229X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 115N: How to Learn Mathematics

What is going on in mathematics education in the United States? Why do so many people hate and fear math? What contributes to the high levels of innumeracy in the general population? Why do girls and women opt out of math when they get a chance? In this seminar we will consider seminal research on math learning in K-12 classrooms, including a focus on equity. We will spend time investigating cases of teaching and learning, through watching videos and visiting schools. This seminar is for those who are interested in education, and who would like to learn about ways to help students (and maybe yourselves?) learn and enjoy mathematics. If you have had bad math experiences and would like to understand them ¿ and put them behind you ¿ this seminar will be particularly good for you. The final project for this class will involve developing a case of one or more math learners, investigating their journeys in the world of math.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 120C: Education and Society (EDUC 220C, SOC 130, SOC 230)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints