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481 - 490 of 579 results for: all courses

PHIL 176A: Classical Seminar: Origins of Political Thought (CLASSHIS 133, CLASSHIS 333, PHIL 276A, POLISCI 330A)

Political philosophy in classical antiquity, focusing on canonical works of Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, and Cicero. Historical background. Topics include: political obligation, citizenship, and leadership; origins and development of democracy; and law, civic strife, and constitutional change.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2013 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 180: Metaphysics (PHIL 280)

The course will be devoted to an exploration of the mereological structure of material objects, and the related notions of 'part', 'whole' and 'constitution'. For instance, an ordinary physical object is susceptible to an analysis in terms of material parts and a structure such that the material constitute that object in virtue of having a certain structure. Among other things, we will consider questions of identity, both at a time and through time, of material objects from this perspective. We will consider both the antecedents for this kind of analysis in Plato and Aristotle and contemporary developments in the mereological analysis of objects. Prerequisite: Philosophy 80 (or consent of instructor).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 181B: Philosophy of Language: Contemporary Debates (PHIL 281B)

This course builds on the material of 181/281, focusing on debates and developments in the pragmatics of conversation, the semantics/pragmatics distinction, the contextuality of meaning, the nature of truth and its connection to meaning, and the workings of particular linguistic constructions of special philosophical relevance. Students who have not taken 181/281 should seek the instructor's advice as to whether they have sufficient background.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Crimmins, M. (PI)

PHIL 182: Truth (PHIL 282)

Focus on the nature of truth; specifically, ongoing debates between so-called correspondence theorists and deflationists. The former generally think truth amounts to some kind of structural isomorphism between the world and our representations of it (like the relationship between a subway map and the subway route itself). Deflationists think the nature of truth is exhausted by something as trifling as the equivalence between affirming something and affirming that it's true: e.g., it's true that Modest Mouse is God's gift to indie rock if and only if Modest Mouse IS God's gift to indie rock. Related issues include the possibility of truth-value "gaps" (claims that are neither true nor false), degrees of truth, relativism and realism about arbitrary subject matters, the semantic paradoxes (like the Liar), the role of truth in the theory of meaning, and the value of true belief. Most readings were written after 1980. Previous courses in philosophy of language and/or metaphysics very strongly encouraged. Phil 80 a must.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 184: Theory of Knowledge (PHIL 284)

What is knowledge? How are beliefs justified? Contemporary theories evaluated against central problems: the regress argument, Gettier problem, and skeptical paradox.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 185: Memory

Structure, content, functional role, and epistemic authority of human memories. Sources include philosophical and psychological literature from different schools and historical periods.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 186: Philosophy of Mind (PHIL 286)

(Graduate students register for 286.) Debates concerning the nature of mental states, their relation to physical states of the human body, how they acquire their content, how people come to know about them in themselves and others, and the roles they play in the explanation of human conduct.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 193C: Film & Philosophy (COMPLIT 154A, FRENCH 154, ITALIAN 154, PHIL 293C)

Issues of freedom, morality, faith, knowledge, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Twelve Monkeys (Gilliam), Ordet (Dreyer), The Dark Knight (Nolan), Vicky Cristina Barcelona (Allen), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 194E: Beauty and Other Forms of Value

The nature and importance of beauty and of our capacity to discern it and respond to it, as discussed by philosophers and artists from various traditions and historical periods. Attempts to think out the relations between beauty and ethical values (such as goodness) on the one hand and cognitive values (such as truth) on the other. Fulfills capstone seminar requirement for the Philosophy and Literature tracks.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 194H: Explanation and Justification

We will discuss the nature of epistemic justification¿in particular, whether it's "internal" or "external" and how, if at all, justification can explain belief. Assignments include a term paper + an oral presentation
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Malmgren, A. (PI)
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