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781 - 790 of 862 results for: all courses

RELIGST 273: Historicism and Its Problems: Ernst Troeltsch, the Study of Religion, and the Crisis of Historicism (RELIGST 373)

Examination of the early twentieth-century historian of religion, philosopher of culture, sociologist of religion, Christian theologian, and philosopher of history, Ernst Troeltsch, within the context of the late nineteenth-century "crisis of historicism," i.e., the historicization and relativization of religious, ethical, social, and political norms. Attention to seminal theorists of history (Herder, Kant, Ranke, Hegel, Nietzsche) in the post-Enlightenment German intellectual tradition and the attempts of Christian and Jewish thinkers in the Weimar era (Barth, Gogarten, Rosenzweig, L. Strauss) to "overcome" the crisis wrought by a radically historical approach to human culture.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2013 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

RELIGST 274: From Kant to Kierkegaard (RELIGST 374)

(Graduate students register for 374. Undergrads register for 274 for 5 units.) The philosophy of religion emerged from the European Enlightenment as a new genre of reflection on religion distinct from both dogmatic theology and rationalist dreams of a "natural" religion of reason. Neither beholden to pre-critical tradition, nor dismissive of what Thomas Nagel has termed "the religious attitude," this new, ostensibly secular, genre of religious thought sought to rethink the meaning of Christianity at a time of immense philosophical ferment. The main currents of religious thought in Germany from Kant's critical philosophy to Kierkegaard's revolt against Hegelianism. Emphasis on the theories of religion, the epistemological status of religious discourse, the role of history (especially the figure of Jesus), and the problem of alienation/reconciliation in seminal modern thinkers: Kant, Schleiermacher, Hegel, and Kierkegaard.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2014 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

RELIGST 290: Majors Seminar

Required of all majors and combined majors. The study of religion reflects upon itself. Representative modern and contemporary attempts to "theorize," and thereby understand, the phenomena of religion in anthropology, psychology, sociology, cultural studies, and philosophy. WIM.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Sockness, B. (PI)

SIMILE 91: Science In the Making an Integrated Learning Environment

SIMILE is a new residentially-based program organized around the question of when something we might call "science" identifiably began, what it became, and what it might become. While we may believe that science, technology and medicine represent some of the powerful tools we have for making a difference in the world, SIMILE challenges students to consider these as dynamic and changing fields of knowledge which must be understood in their historical, cultural and social contexts. Only then can we consider how new ideas, interpretations, technological artifacts and systems respond to societal needs within the limits of what is possible but also, importantly, in light of what might even become plausible.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2014 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SIMILE 92: Science in the Making Integrated Learning Environment

SIMILE is a new residentially-based program organized around the question of when something we might call "science" identifiably began, what it became, and what it might become. While we may believe that science, technology and medicine represent some of the powerful tools we have for making a difference in the world, SIMILE challenges students to consider these as dynamic and changing fields of knowledge which must be understood in their historical, cultural and social contexts. Only then can we consider how new ideas, interpretations, technological artifacts and systems respond to societal needs within the limits of what is possible but also, importantly, in light of what might even become plausible.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SINY 112: Outside In: Arts Organizations and the Changing Cultural Audience

Study the major disruptions in how audiences define, seek out, participate in, and share cultural experiences. Research¿based theory with practice, case studies and hands¿on assignments. Analyze newly emerging cultural consumers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Cohen, A. (PI)

SINY 116: Off the iPhone and Into the City: Creating a Photography Project

Learn components of photography projects and image making including content selection, intention, context, and audience. Talks by professional photographers; field trips to in the city. Two response papers about an exhibition, publication, or long-form web project during their time in New York.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jackson, D. (PI)

SINY 122: The Agile City

Examine the economic, cultural and environmental forces transforming the urban experience globally and understand how cities become agile to adapt to rapidly evolving urban challenges. This course would draw from case studies in New York and elsewhere, using guest experts and site visits or walking tours.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Russell, J. (PI)

SINY 124: New York and the Art World

In an influential essay of 1964 responding to the work of Andy Warhol and Jasper Johns, the philosopher Arthur Danto defined an "artworld" as "an atmosphere of artistic theory." More generally, the term art world has come to mean a social, cultural and economic network consisting of art professionals (artists, curators, collectors, gallerists/dealers, historians, educators and critics) and institutions (the media, museums, galleries, schools, auction houses and other markets, such as art fairs). Since the end of World War II and the migration of European artists associated with the School of Paris, New York has traditionally been considered the capital of the art world, a position it largely retains even as the contemporary art world is a global phenomenon. This course considers the definitions and practices associated with the New York art world through readings in history and theory and extensive on-the-ground engagement with its pivotal figures and sites. Field trips to museums, galleries and other cultural institutions showcase the wider implications and professional aspects of current art making, as well as the exhibition, distribution and reception of contemporary art. Some background in art history is helpful but not required.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SINY 136: Opera at the Met: Global Art in the World's Great Metropolis

This course allows students to discover the power and beauty of live opera through masterful performances at the Metropolitan Opera House.Often viewed as an elitist art, opera has strong roots in popular culture and politics. These issues will emerge over the course of the quarter, as we experience opera at the world's premiere opera house.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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