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751 - 760 of 896 results for: all courses

PHIL 185: Theory of Understanding (PHIL 285)

This course will survey some of the ongoing work on understanding in philosophy and psychology. The questions considered will include: What exactly is understanding? How does understanding differ from knowledge of commonplace facts? What are the different forms understanding takes (e.g. scientific, social, historical, aesthetic, etc), and how are the different forms of understanding related? Is there such a thing as implicit understanding?
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 186: Philosophy of Mind (PHIL 286)

(Graduate students register for 286.) This is an advanced introduction to core topics in the philosophy of mind. Prerequisite: PHIL 80
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Taylor, K. (PI)

PHIL 193C: Film & Philosophy (COMPLIT 154A, ENGLISH 154F, FRENCH 154, ITALIAN 154, PHIL 293C)

Issues of authenticity, morality, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Blade Runner (Scott), Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), Fight Club (Fincher), La Jetée (Marker), Memento (Nolan), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 193D: Dante and Aristotle

Students will read all of Dante¿s Commedia alongside works by Aristotle and various ancient and medieval philosophers. Our aim will be to understand the way an Aristotelian worldview informs the Commedia. For instance, what is the role of pleasure in the ethical life? What is the highest good of the human being? All readings will be in translation.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2015 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PHIL 194H: Capstone Seminar: Self-knowledge and Consciousness

Capstone seminar for the major. What is it for a mental state to be introspectively accessible, which mental states fall in this category, how does the capacity for introspection yield (self-)knowledge, and what is the relationship between introspection and consciousness? This seminar explores these questions through in-class discussions, reading and writing.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 194L: Montaigne

Preference to Philosophy seniors. Philosophical and literary aspects of Montaigne's Essays including the nature of the self and self-fashioning, skepticism, fideism, and the nature of Montaigne's philosophical project. Montaigne's development of the essay as a literary genre.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PHIL 194P: Naming and Necessity

Saul Kripke's lectures on reference, modal metaphysics, and the mind/body problem.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2010 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 194S: Skepticism

Modern arguments for skepticism are hard to combat, but also curiously inert in ordinary life. We will look at a variety of contemporary attempts to come to terms with skepticism about the external world, each of which seeks to exploit the curious inertness of skeptical hypotheses.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2013 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 194W: Capstone Seminar: Literature and the Moral Imagination

Literature is often hailed for its ability to expand our moral horizons and to make us better, more empathetic people. But is literature actually able to do these things? If it is, is it unique in its power to do so? How can reading a work of creative fiction improve us in real life? Can reading literature ever make us worse? This course is an investigation into these and related questions, which special attention given to the ways that literature can (and cannot) engage the moral imagination. Readings will alternate between contemporary philosophical articles on the relation between literature, ethics, and the moral imagination, and classic and contemporary works of literature that engage the moral imagination in different ways. Some background in aesthetics, ethics, and/or the philosophy of literature is preferred, but not required. (This is a capstone seminar for philosophy majors and students pursuing the Philosophy & Literature concentration. Other students are welcome to enroll, but preference will be given to students in these groups.)
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 31N: Political Freedom: Rights, Justice, and Democracy in the Western Tradition

Freedom is one of our core values. Most people can agree that freedom is a good thing. Yet there is far less agreement about how to understand the concept itself and what kinds of political arrangements are best suited to protect and enhance freedom. Is freedom about being left alone? Undertaking action with others? Participating in governance? Does freedom require a limited state? An active and interventionist government? A robustly participatory political system? How is freedom connected to other political values, like justice and equality? This seminar will consider and evaluate some of the most controversial and challenging answers that have been given to these questions by canonical thinkers like John Locke, John Stuart Mill, and Karl Marx, as well as by more contemporary political and legal thinkers like Jeremy Waldron and Cass Sunstein. We will also examine how questions about the nature of freedom play out on college campuses and in the courts.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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