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MUSIC 155: Intermedia Workshop (ARTSTUDI 239, MUSIC 255)

Students develop and produce intermedia works. Musical and visual approaches to the conceptualisation and shaping of time-based art. Exploration of sound and image relationship. Study of a wide spectrum of audiovisual practices including experimental animation, video art, dance, performance, non-narrative forms, interactive art and installation art. Focus on works that use music/sound and image as equal partners. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: consent of instructors, and one of FILMPROD 114, ARTSTUDI 131, 138, 167, 177, 179, or MUSIC 123, or equivalent. May be repeated for credit
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 185: Technologies of Musical Expression

Music is made and experienced through technology created for it. These technologies allow for expression but influence the result. This course will utilize special collections, acoustical tools, music-making apps, live musicians, and media both historical and modern to reflect on the ways people make music expressive. The course is designed around creative projects and hands on experiences with digital and analogue media, player pianos, archival manuscripts, and sound sculptures to stimulate discussion about the role of technology in our musical experiences. Projects can include performances using digital and analogue media, performance art, creating player piano rolls, or performance ethnographies, etc. WAYS credit for 3 units and grade only.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 220B: Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics, and Computational Music

The use of high-level programming language as a compositional aid in creating musical structures. Advanced study of sound synthesis techniques. Simulation of a reverberant space and control of the position of sound within the space. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/. Prerequisite: 220A.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 122: Historiography & Native American Oral Traditions and Narratives

This course is an introduction to Native American Literature in the United States in a (post) colonial, or decolonized context (in the last seventy years). The readings focus on the complex social and political influences that have shaped Native American literature in the last half of the twentieth century to the present. It is an introduction to nNative American fiction, poetry, drama, nonfiction and autobiography. It draws on the historical (literary sovereignty) and theoretical frameworks (American Indian Literary Nationalism) used by Native American writers in the United States; how trends in Native American writing build on and integrate traditional modes of Native American nstorytelling (oral tradition & the verbal arts). It takes a specific in - depth look at Native American oral tradition. Where the overarching aim of the course is to address the nquestion: How do you define Native American literature? Students will be required to provide their own definition from what they learn about Native American oral tradition and the challenges (historic and otherwise) inherent in a (post) colonial or decolonized world for Native Americans.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B, CSRE 134, EDUC 214)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

NATIVEAM 143A: American Indian Mythology, Legend, and Lore (AMSTUD 143M, ENGLISH 43A, ENGLISH 143A)

(English majors and others taking 5 units, register for 143A.) Readings from American Indian literatures, old and new. Stories, songs, and rituals from the 19th century, including the Navajo Night Chant. Tricksters and trickster stories; war, healing, and hunting songs; Aztec songs from the 16th century. Readings from modern poets and novelists including N. Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, and Leslie Marmon Silko, and the classic autobiography, "Black Elk Speaks."
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fields, K. (PI)

NATIVEAM 211: The California Missions: Art History and Reconciliation (ARTHIST 211, CSRE 111)

Sites of the spirit and devotion, sites of genocide, foreboding actors in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, the subject of fourth-grade school projects, the Spanish Missions of Alta California are complex sites of inquiry, their meanings and associations different for each visitor. This seminar examines the art and architecture of the California Missions built between 1769 and 1823. Constructed with local materials and decorated with reredos, paintings and sculptures from Mexico and Spain, the Missions are at once humble spaces and flagships of a belated global baroque. They were also the laboratories of indigenous artists and artisans. This course seeks to understand how Mission art was meant to function, how and why it was made, what its materials were, while asking what the larger role of art was in a global system of missions. Can the study of this art lead to the reconciliation of populations in North America and within the field of art history? The Missions require a specific reexamination of the relationship between European and colonial forms, not as objects of curiosity or diffusion but as viable and globally informed agents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kinew, S. (PI)

OBGYN 81Q: Perspectives on the Abortion Experience in Western Fiction

Explores the role of media in delivering abortion-related messages as well as the broader questions of how abortion and related issues are fundamentally integrated into the social fabric of US and global societies. Abortion remains one of the most controversial and polarizing challenges of our time. Yet, it has been a clinical, social, political, and cultural fact in a broad swath of societies for centuries. As is common for such lightning rod issues, the topic of abortion has featured prominently in novels and films. Each treatment provides a unique perspective on at least one aspect of abortion, whether it be clinical, social, political or cultural. How abortion is portrayed in novels and films provides the student of history, anthropology, and biology with insights into the author's or director's perspectives, and into societal attitudes and mores.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

OSPBER 17: Split Images: A Century of Cinema

20th-century German culture through film. The silent era, Weimar, and the instrumentalization of film in the Third Reich. The postwar era: ideological and aesthetic codes of DEFA, new German cinema, and post-Wende filmmaking including Run Lola Run and Goodbye Lenin. Aesthetic aspects of the films including image composition, camera and editing techniques, and relation between sound and image.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kramer, K. (PI)

OSPBER 60: Cityscape as History: Architecture and Urban Design in Berlin

Diversity of Berlin's architecture and urban design resulting from its historical background. Architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and his artistic ancestors. Role of the cultural exchange between Germany and the U.S. Changing nature of the city from the 19th century to the present.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Pabsch, M. (PI)
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