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FRENCH 246: Body over Mind (FRENCH 346, ITALIAN 346)

How does modern fiction, aided by modern philosophy, give the lie to Descartes' famous "I think therefore I am"? And how does writing convey the desire for a different, perhaps stronger, integration of mind and body? Does the body speak a particular truth that we must learn to hear, that the mind is not always connected to? How do modern metaphors for the mind-body connection shape our experience? These questions will be explored via the works of major French and Italian writers and thinkers, including Pirandello, Calvino, Camus, Houellebecq, Sartre, and Agamben.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FRENCH 247: Islam and the Western Imagination (COMPLIT 147S, CSRE 147S, FRENCH 347, HISTORY 230J)

With fear of Islamic terrorism running high and restrictive immigration policies at home, it is more urgent than ever to understand the complex and changing relations between Islam and the West, the West and Islam. Using France's history and culture as a main study case, along with other Western contexts, this course will look at the long history of Europe's interactions with the Muslim world, as well as the presence of Islam and Muslims in the West, from the 7th century to the present day. Uncovering the long and complex relationship between France and Islam, historical, literary and media sources will help us explore early Christian myths about Islam, the period of European coexistence, European colonialism in North Africa and the Middle East, the place of feminism in Western-Muslim relations, (post)colonial immigration and finally, a post-9/11 world order characterized by new forms of Islamophobia. In the context of the course, students will be exposed to primary sources including audiovisual materials, literature, manifestos, and theory. Readings will be in English (and optional readings in French for students who would prefer to read in French).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Marcus, E. (PI)

FRENCH 249: The Algerian Wars (CSRE 249, HISTORY 239G, JEWISHST 249)

From Algiers the White to Algiers the Red, Algiers, the Mecca of the Revolutionaries in the words of Amilcar Cabral, this course offers to study the Algerian Wars since the French conquest of Algeria (1830-) to the Algerian civil war of the 1990s. We will revisit the ways in which the war has been narrated in literature and cinema, popular culture, and political discourse. A special focus will be given to the Algerian War of Independence (1954-1962). The course considers the racial representations of the war in the media, the continuing legacies surrounding the conflict in France, Africa, and the United States, from Che Guevara to the Black Panthers. A key focus will be the transmission of collective memory through transnational lenses, and analyses of commemorative events and movies. nReadings from James Baldwin, Assia Djebar, Albert Camus, Frantz Fanon, Mouloud Feraoun. Movies include "The Battle of Algiers," "Days of Glory," and "Viva Laldjérie." nTaught in English.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FRENCH 252: Art and Power: From Royal Spectacle to Revolutionary Ritual (ARTHIST 252A)

From the Palace of Versailles to grand operas to Jacques-Louis David's portraits of revolutionary martyrs, rarely have the arts been so powerfully mobilized by the State as in early modern France. This course examines how the arts were used from Louis XIV to the Revolution in order to broadcast political authority across Europe. We will also consider the resistance to such attempts to elicit shock-and-awe through artistic patronage. By studying music, architecture, garden design, the visual arts, and theater together, students will gain a new perspective on works of art in their political contexts. But we will also examine the libelous pamphlets and satirical cartoons that turned the monarchy¿s grandeur against itself, ending the course with an examination of the new artistic regime of the French Revolution. The course will be taught in English with the option of French readings for departmental majors.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FRENCH 254: Was Deconstruction an Illusion?

A both systematic and historical presentation of "Deconstruction" as a philosophical and intellectual movement that dominated academic and general culture in many western societies during the final decades of the twentieth century, with special focus on the writings of Jacques Derrida and Paul de Man. Deconstruction's specific reception history obliges us to ask the question of whether the extremely high esteem that it enjoyed over two decades was intellectually justified – or the result of a misunderstanding. Participation through English translations is possible.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2014 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FRENCH 266: Food, Text, Music: A Multidisciplinary Lab on the Art of Feasting (FRENCH 166, FRENCH 366, MUSIC 133, MUSIC 333)

Students cook a collection of unfamiliar recipes each week while learning about the cultural milieus in which they originated. The course focuses on the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, a time of great banquets that brought together chefs, visual artists, poets, musicians, and dancers. Students read late-medieval cookbooks under the guidance of professional chefs, learn songs and poetry with the help of visiting performers, and delve into a burgeoning scholarly literature on food history and sensory experience. We will also study trade routes and food networks, the environmental impact of large-scale banquets, the science of food, and the politics of plenty. This course may count towards the Medieval component of the French major, and corresponds to DLCL 121, a course requirement for the Medieval Studies Minor. Students interested in applying for course must email both professors (mgalvez@stanford.edu, jrodin@stanford.edu) by 30 November with a statement of up to 350 words that includes: (a) reasons for wanting to take the class; (b) relevant background in cooking/medieval studies/etc.; (c) stated commitment to attend all ten course meetings; and (d) any dietary restrictions/preferences.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FRENCH 270: Les Misérables (FRENCH 370)

Les Misérables is a true monument to XIXth century France. Yet, though everyone has heard of it, few have actually read it. In this seminar, we will correct this by reading the whole tome and by discussing its relevance to both its historical context and our current world. A monstrous novel spanning about 1800 pages, Les Misérables also spans a whole century of political conflict, social strife, cultural transformations, a personal drama. During the course of the quarter, we will go slowly through the novel, by turning our attention during each session to a specific topic present in the reading for the day. Those topics will include, among others, religion, the role of women in society, romanticism, war, Paris in the XIXth century, revolution, and justice. Taught in French.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FRENCH 287: Sex, Gender, and Violence: French Women Writers Today (FEMGEN 187X, FEMGEN 287X, FEMGEN 387X, FRENCH 187, FRENCH 387)

Long before the 2017 #Metoo campaign, French women writers have explored through powerful fictions and autobiographies the different shades of economic, social, psychological, physical, or sexual violence that is exerted against, but also by and between, women. How does literature - the power of words - address, deconstruct or comfort power dynamics (during sex and between the sexes) that are usually silenced, taboo or unspeakable? Themes explored: sex and gender, sex and power, rape culture, sexual and moral taboos (incest, abortion, pornography, infanticide, lesbianism), the body as social stigma or source of meaning. Special attention given to narrative and descriptive strategies designed to avert, expose, deconstruct or account for specifically feminine experiences (rape, orgasm, pregnancy). Authors include Marie Darrieusecq, Christine Angot, Annie Ernaux, Marie NDiaye, Virginie Despentes, Leila Slimani, Ivan Jablonka along with feminist theory.nNOTE: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take FRENCH 187 or FEMGEN 187X for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Alduy, C. (PI)

GERMAN 75N: Famous Last Words

What would you say if you knew it would be the last thing you would ever say? Who would you want to hear your words? Would you want to inspire somebody? Terrify them? Shout your defiance or your love in their direction?nThis is a course about last words the final utterances left as legacies for the world in the face of revolution, war, betrayal, heartbreak, or that simplest of endings, death. We will look at a wide variety of last words, including last words codified as genres¿quotations, suicide notes, epitaphs, dying declarations, Japanese death poems, confessions, and the like as literary devices (last sentences, envois, punch lines, epilogues), and as forms of social or cultural practice (the making of heroes, idols, and martyrs in religious, political, and popular culture). We will look at fictional last words, real last words, last words spoken by heroes, gods, and ordinary people. And we will end the course, each of us, by writing out our own last words imagining what we each would write, if we had to sum up what mattered most to us, and if we wanted some small selection of signs to stand in, as it has for many of the authors we will read, for our life and the legacy of it.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Pao, L. (PI)

GERMAN 88: Germany in 5 Words (GERMAN 101)

This course explores German history, culture and politics by tracing five (largely untranslatable) words and exploring the debates they have engendered in Germany over the past 200 years. This course is intended as preparation for students wishing to spend a quarter at the Bing Overseas Studies campus in Berlin, but is open to everyone. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Daub, A. (PI)
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