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AMSTUD 63N: The Feminist Critique: The History and Politics of Gender Equality (CSRE 63N, FEMGEN 63N, HISTORY 63N)

This course explores the long history of ideas about gender and equality. Each week we read, dissect, compare, and critique a set of primary historical documents (political and literary) from around the world, moving from the 15th century to the present. We tease out changing arguments about education, the body, sexuality, violence, labor, politics, and the very meaning of gender, and we place feminist critics within national and global political contexts.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

ANTHRO 182N: Smoke and Mirrors in Global Health

A few years ago, health experts began calling out tobacco as engendering a global health crisis, categorizing the cigarette as the world's greatest weapon of mass destruction. A "global health crisis"? What merits that title if not tobacco use? A hundred million people were killed by tobacco in the 20th century, and ten times that number ¿ a billion people ¿ are predicted to die prematurely from exposure to cigarette smoke over the next hundred years. How has tobacconcome to be labeled a global health crisis over the last decade and what has been the political response? From whence does activism and ongoing complacency regarding tobacco arise? How are they created in different cultural contexts?nnThis course aims to provide students conceptual tools to tackle two specific thought projects: (1) to understand how institutional actors compete to define a situation in the world today as a problem of global health, and (2) to understand the sociocultural means by which something highly dangerous to health such as the cigarette is made both politically contentious and inert. On both fronts, special attention will be given to the ways global health activism and complacency unfold in the U.S. and China.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ARCHLGY 43N: The Archaeological Imagination (CLASSICS 43N)

More than excavating ancient sites and managing collections of old things, Archaeology is a way of experiencing the world: imagining past lives through ruins and remains; telling the story of a prehistoric village through the remains of the site and its artifacts; dealing with the return of childhood memories; designing a museum for a community. The archaeological imagination is a creative capacity mobilized when we experience traces and vestiges of the past, when we gather, classify, conserve and restore, when we work with such remains to deliver stories, reconstructions, accounts, explanations, or whatever. This class will explore such a wide archaeological perspective in novels, poetry, fantasy literature, the arts, movies, online gaming, and through some key debates in contemporary archaeology about human origins, the spread of urban life, the rise and fall of ancient empires.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Shanks, M. (PI)

ARCHLGY 60N: Digging for Answers: 5 Big Questions of Our Time

The aim in this course is to explore the archaeological evidence for long-term change with regard to 5 major questions of our time: Where do we come from? Has inequality increased? Have we become more violent? Why do we have so much stuff? What is the relationship between humans and climate change? You will be introduced to recent publications for class debate, and will also be introduced to the ways in which archaeologists use evidence in order to explore the 5 themes. We will go to Stanford¿s archaeological collections so that you can have hands-on experience of artifacts and will be able to problem solve using data from the instructor¿s own excavations. We will also visit labs (archaeological and genomic for example), local museums and local archaeological excavations.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Hodder, I. (PI)

BIO 6N: Ocean Conservation: Pathways to Solutions

We will learn how to design pathways to solutions by integrating social sciences and governance into our case studies. We will address both conventional (fisheries management, reducing the impacts of global shipping, marine protected areas) and emerging research and management approaches (marine spatial planning, dynamic ocean management, environmental DNA). Oceans are facing long-term challenges, like overfishing and pollution that we know how to solve, and emerging challenges, like climate change and ocean plastics, for which solutions are more elusive. Ultimately to achieve long-term sustainability, solutions have to work for both people and the planet. These puzzles offer challenging complex systems problems that will require our best interdisciplinary thinking to solve.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Crowder, L. (PI)

CHEM 29N: Chemistry in the Kitchen

This course examines the chemistry relevant to food and drink preparation, both in homes and in restaurants, which makes what we consume more pleasurable. Good cooking is more often considered an art rather than a science, but a small bit of understanding goes a long way to make the preparation and consumption of food and drink more enjoyable. The intention is to have demonstrations and tastings as a part of every class meeting. We will examine some rather familiar items in this course: eggs, dairy products, meats, breads, vegetables, pastries, and carbonated beverages. We shall playfully explore the chemistry that turns food into meals. A high-school chemistry background is assumed; bring to class a good appetite and a healthy curiosity.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Zare, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 10N: Odysseus Does Dublin: Joyce's Ulysses and Modernist Myth

Upon publication nearly a century ago, Ulyssesby the Irish writer James Joyce was met by many readers with bewilderment and disgust. The story of meanderings around Dublin's districts, both posh and seamy, by a modern Odysseus and Telemachus was banned as pornographic for more than a decade in both the US and UK. Nevertheless, the book rapidly gained recognition as a masterpiece and is now considered one of the most important works of world literature. This seminar will be devoted to a careful reading of the entire text within a number of frames, including classical Greek epic models and ideas about myth, as well as more immediate social, political, and artistic contexts. No previous familiarity with Joyce's work is assumed.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Martin, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 16N: Sappho: Erotic Poetess of Lesbos (FEMGEN 24N)

Preference to freshmen. Sappho's surviving fragments in English; traditions referring to or fantasizing about her disputed life. How her poetry and legend inspired women authors and male poets such as Swinburne, Baudelaire, and Pound. Paintings inspired by Sappho in ancient and modern times, and composers who put her poetry to music.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-CE, WAY-ED
Instructors: Peponi, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 43N: The Archaeological Imagination (ARCHLGY 43N)

More than excavating ancient sites and managing collections of old things, Archaeology is a way of experiencing the world: imagining past lives through ruins and remains; telling the story of a prehistoric village through the remains of the site and its artifacts; dealing with the return of childhood memories; designing a museum for a community. The archaeological imagination is a creative capacity mobilized when we experience traces and vestiges of the past, when we gather, classify, conserve and restore, when we work with such remains to deliver stories, reconstructions, accounts, explanations, or whatever. This class will explore such a wide archaeological perspective in novels, poetry, fantasy literature, the arts, movies, online gaming, and through some key debates in contemporary archaeology about human origins, the spread of urban life, the rise and fall of ancient empires.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Shanks, M. (PI)

COMPMED 81Q: Aardvarks to Zebras: The A to Z of Animal Anatomy

Preference to sophomores.Ever wonder what cats and narwhals have in common? Maybe you haven't, but despite their seemingly different lifestyles and habitats (i.e. sleeping on couches versus swimming in oceans), they are both mammals! In this seminar, students will gain an appreciation for basic mammalian anatomic and physiologic principles that span across multiple species while emphasizing key differences that render each species unique. Through student projects, we will explore evolutionary adaptations that have driven the success of a variety of species within the context of their natural environments. In addition to a weekly lecture, weekly laboratory sessions will reinforce anatomic principles through a combination of rodent cadaver dissection, organ and bone specimens, and use of virtual reality demonstrations. Furthermore, students will have the opportunity to visit Año Nuevo State Park to experience a guided viewing of northern elephant seals within their natural habitat. Students with a passion for science will gain a fundamental understanding of anatomy that is applicable to future careers in medicine, biomedical research, veterinary medicine, and ecology/conservation.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Casey, K. (PI)
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