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1 - 10 of 34 results for: all courses

AFRICAAM 80Q: Race and Gender in Silicon Valley (CS 80Q)

This course interrogates the social challenges of Silicon Valley, a place of privilege, privation, and precarity, and encourages students to perform their own ethnographical studies through writing, coding, engagement, digital culture, and social practice. We will learn about the importance of technology in shaping our critical understanding of social conditions in our community and the global economy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

APPPHYS 79Q: Energy Options for the 21st Century

Preference to sophomores.. Choices for meeting the future energy needs of the U.S. and the world. Basic physics of energy sources, technologies that might be employed, and related public policy issues. Trade-offs and societal impacts of different energy sources. Policy options for making rational choices for a sustainable world energy economy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fox, J. (PI)

CEE 31Q: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to sophomores. Drawing architecture provides a deeper understanding of the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CHEMENG 60Q: Environmental Regulation and Policy

Preference to sophomores. How environmental policy is formulated in the U.S. How and what type of scientific research is incorporated into decisions. How to determine acceptable risk, the public's right to know of chemical hazards, waste disposal and clean manufacturing, brownfield redevelopment, and new source review regulations. The proper use of science and engineering including media presentation and misrepresentation, public scientific and technical literacy, and emotional reactions. Alternative models to formulation of environmental policy. Political and economic forces, and stakeholder discussions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Libicki, S. (PI)

CHEMENG 90Q: Dare to Care: Compassionate Design

Imagine yourself with your abundant creativity, intellect, and passion, but your ability to move or speak is diminished. How would you face the world, how would you thrive at Stanford, how would you relay to people your ideas and creations? How would you share yourself and your ideas with the world? nThere are more than 50 million individuals in America with at least one disability, and in the current world of design, these differences are often overlooked. How do we as designers empower people of diverse physical abilities and provide them with means of self-expression?nnIn Compassionate Design, students from any prospective major are invited to explore the engineering design process by examining the needs of persons with disabilities. Through invited guests, students will have the opportunity to directly engage people with different types of disabilities as a foundation to design products that address problems of motion and mobility, vision, speech and hearing. For example, in class, more »
Imagine yourself with your abundant creativity, intellect, and passion, but your ability to move or speak is diminished. How would you face the world, how would you thrive at Stanford, how would you relay to people your ideas and creations? How would you share yourself and your ideas with the world? nThere are more than 50 million individuals in America with at least one disability, and in the current world of design, these differences are often overlooked. How do we as designers empower people of diverse physical abilities and provide them with means of self-expression?nnIn Compassionate Design, students from any prospective major are invited to explore the engineering design process by examining the needs of persons with disabilities. Through invited guests, students will have the opportunity to directly engage people with different types of disabilities as a foundation to design products that address problems of motion and mobility, vision, speech and hearing. For example, in class, students will interview people who are deaf, blind, have cerebral palsy, or other disabling conditions. Students will then be asked, using the design tools they have been exposed to as part of the seminar, to create a particular component or device that enhances the quality of life for that user or users with similar limitations.nnPresentation skills are taught and emphasized as students will convey their designs to the class and instructors. Students will complete this seminar with a compassionate view toward design for the disabled, they will acquire a set of design tools that they can use to empower themselves and others in whatever direction they choose to go, and they will have increased confidence and abilities in presenting in front of an audience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Moalli, J. (PI)

CHINA 20Q: Humanities Core: Dao, Virtue, and Nature -- Foundations of East Asian Thought (HUMCORE 20Q, JAPAN 20Q, KOREA 20Q)

This course explores the values and questions posed in the formative period of East Asian civilizations. Notions of a Dao ("Way") are common to Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism, but those systems of thought have radically different ideas about what that Dao is and how it might be realized in society and an individual's life. These systems of thought appeared first in China, and eventually spread to Korea and Japan. Each culture developed its own ways of reconciling the competing systems, but in each case the comprehensive structure of values and human ideals differs significantly from those that appeared elsewhere in the ancient world. The course examines East Asian ideas about self-cultivation, harmonious society, rulership, and the relation between human and nature with a view toward expanding our understanding of these issues in human history, and highlighting their legacies in Asian civilizations today. The course features selective readings in classics of Confucian, Daoist, and more »
This course explores the values and questions posed in the formative period of East Asian civilizations. Notions of a Dao ("Way") are common to Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism, but those systems of thought have radically different ideas about what that Dao is and how it might be realized in society and an individual's life. These systems of thought appeared first in China, and eventually spread to Korea and Japan. Each culture developed its own ways of reconciling the competing systems, but in each case the comprehensive structure of values and human ideals differs significantly from those that appeared elsewhere in the ancient world. The course examines East Asian ideas about self-cultivation, harmonious society, rulership, and the relation between human and nature with a view toward expanding our understanding of these issues in human history, and highlighting their legacies in Asian civilizations today. The course features selective readings in classics of Confucian, Daoist, and Buddhist texts that present the foundational tenets of Asian thought. N. B. This is the first of three courses in the Humanities Core, East Asian track. These courses show how history and ideas shape our world and future. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to the life of the mind.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Egan, R. (PI)

CHINA 154Q: Utopia/Dystopia in Chinese Literature and Culture

What has China been dreaming of? Since 2013, Chinese president Xi Jinping has been trying to popularize the idea of Chinese Dream as an expression of national and individual vision. But dreams of places better or worse have been abound in the land we know as China since at least Tao Yuanming described the mysterious Peach Blossom Spring in the 5th century. How many dreams have been dreamt since then? How have the visions and ideals expressed in these dreams changed in relation to the succession of imperial dynasties, the trauma of Western imperialism, the modernizing experiments, and today¿s rise of China as a major world power?nnThe science fiction writer and translator Ken Liu writes that ¿texts concerning dreams always say something about the dreamer, the dream interpreter, and the audience.¿ In this course, we will understand China and Chinese culture by investigating Chinese texts that dream, particularly those that dream about utopias and dystopias.We will consider indigenous uto more »
What has China been dreaming of? Since 2013, Chinese president Xi Jinping has been trying to popularize the idea of Chinese Dream as an expression of national and individual vision. But dreams of places better or worse have been abound in the land we know as China since at least Tao Yuanming described the mysterious Peach Blossom Spring in the 5th century. How many dreams have been dreamt since then? How have the visions and ideals expressed in these dreams changed in relation to the succession of imperial dynasties, the trauma of Western imperialism, the modernizing experiments, and today¿s rise of China as a major world power?nnThe science fiction writer and translator Ken Liu writes that ¿texts concerning dreams always say something about the dreamer, the dream interpreter, and the audience.¿ In this course, we will understand China and Chinese culture by investigating Chinese texts that dream, particularly those that dream about utopias and dystopias.We will consider indigenous utopian traditions, early modern speculative fiction written under the influence of modern ideologies ranging from nationalism, Social Darwinism to Marxism, as well as contemporary science fiction by writers such as the Hugo Award-winning Liu Cixin and Hao Jingfang. As we analyze the desires, hopes, and fears that manifest themselves in these Chinese alternative realities, we will also think about questions that concern all of us as human beings: who are we and how do we want to live with one another?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Zhou, C. (PI)

COMPLIT 31Q: Humanities Core: Middle East I -- Ancient (DLCL 31Q, HUMCORE 31Q)

This course tells the story of the cradle of civilization. We will start from the earliest human stories, and follow the path from Gligamesh to the Quran via Babylon, the Hebrew Bible, and ancient philosophy. We will read letters, myths, and religious texts in order to pose questions about how how different we are we now in Silicon Valley. What are our traditions? Our faiths? Our foundational stories, or myths? Should we connect ourselves in deep ways to the most ancient past of civilization, or seek to distance ourselves from those origins? N.B. This is the first of three courses in the Middle Eastern track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study Middle Eastern history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 37Q: Zionism and the Novel (JEWISHST 37Q)

At the end of the nineteenth century, Zionism emerged as a political movement to establish a national homeland for the Jews, eventually leading to the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. This seminar uses novels to explore the changes in Zionism, the roots of the conflict in the Middle East, and the potentials for the future. We will take a close look at novels by Israelis, both Jewish and Arab, in order to understand multiple perspectives, and we will also consider works by authors from the North America and from Europe. Note: This course must be taken for a letter grade to be eligible for WAYS credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Berman, R. (PI)

COMPMED 87Q: Laboratory Mouse in Biomedical Research

Preference to sophomores. Focus is on the laboratory mouse, a widely used and important research model. Topics include the ethics of animal use in research; the natural history, origin and husbandry of the mouse; characteristics of key mouse strains; its anatomy and physiology; common diseases and their effects on research; coat color genetics relative to human diseases; immunodeficient mouse models; and genetic engineering of mice. The laboratory includes necropsy, handling, introduction to anesthesia and surgery, identification methods, and common research techniques using live and dead mice. Enrollment limited to 14 students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Nagamine, C. (PI)
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