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1 - 10 of 28 results for: all courses

AFRICAAM 80Q: Race and Gender in Silicon Valley (CS 80Q)

Join us as we go behind the scenes of some of the big headlines about trouble in Silicon Valley. We'll start with the basic questions like who decides who gets to see themselves as "a computer person," and how do early childhood and educational experiences shape our perceptions of our relationship to technology? Then we'll see how those questions are fundamental to a wide variety of recent events from #metoo in tech companies, to the ways the under-representation of women and people of color in tech companies impacts the kinds of products that Silicon Valley brings to market. We'll see how data and the coming age of AI raise the stakes on these questions of identity and technology. How can we ensure that AI technology will help reduce bias in human decision-making in areas from marketing to criminal justice, rather than amplify it?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lee, C. (PI)

CEE 31Q: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to sophomores. Drawing architecture provides a deeper understanding of the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CHEMENG 60Q: Environmental Regulation and Policy

Preference to sophomores. How does government, politics and science affect environmental policy? We examine environmental policy including the precautionary principal, acceptable risks, mathematical models, and cost-effectiveness of regulation. You will learn how data is changing environmental regulation and how different administrations mold environmental policy in real-time. We examine the use of science and engineering, its media presentation and misrepresentation, and the effect of public scientific and technical literacy. You will learn how to participate in the process and effect change.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Libicki, S. (PI)

CHEMENG 90Q: Dare to Care: Compassionate Design

Imagine yourself with your abundant creativity, intellect, and passion, but your ability to move or speak is diminished. How would you face the world, how would you thrive at Stanford, how would you relay to people your ideas and creations? How would you share yourself and your ideas with the world? nThere are more than 50 million individuals in America with at least one disability, and in the current world of design, these differences are often overlooked. How do we as designers empower people of diverse physical abilities and provide them with means of self-expression?nnIn Compassionate Design, students from any prospective major are invited to explore the engineering design process by examining the needs of persons with disabilities. Through invited guests, students will have the opportunity to directly engage people with different types of disabilities as a foundation to design products that address problems of motion and mobility, vision, speech and hearing. For example, in class, students will interview people who are deaf, blind, have cerebral palsy, or other disabling conditions. Students will then be asked, using the design tools they have been exposed to as part of the seminar, to create a particular component or device that enhances the quality of life for that user or users with similar limitations.nnPresentation skills are taught and emphasized as students will convey their designs to the class and instructors. Students will complete this seminar with a compassionate view toward design for the disabled, they will acquire a set of design tools that they can use to empower themselves and others in whatever direction they choose to go, and they will have increased confidence and abilities in presenting in front of an audience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Moalli, J. (PI)

COMPMED 87Q: Laboratory Mouse in Biomedical Research

Preference to sophomores. This course focuses on the laboratory mouse, a widely used and important biomedical research model. We will explore the natural history and origin of the laboratory mouse; the ethics and regulations on the use of mice in research; the characteristics and nomenclature of commonly used mouse strains; the anatomy, physiology, and husbandry of laboratory mice; common mouse diseases and their effects on research; mouse coat color genetics and its relevance to human diseases; immunodeficient mouse models and their uses in biomedical research; and the technology for genetically engineering laboratory mice (e.g., transgenic mice). The laboratory component of the course uses live or dead mice to provide hands-on experience with mouse handling; necropsy; anesthesia and surgery; identification methods; and techniques commonly used in biomedical research. Enrollment limited to 14 students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Nagamine, C. (PI)

CS 80Q: Race and Gender in Silicon Valley (AFRICAAM 80Q)

Join us as we go behind the scenes of some of the big headlines about trouble in Silicon Valley. We'll start with the basic questions like who decides who gets to see themselves as "a computer person," and how do early childhood and educational experiences shape our perceptions of our relationship to technology? Then we'll see how those questions are fundamental to a wide variety of recent events from #metoo in tech companies, to the ways the under-representation of women and people of color in tech companies impacts the kinds of products that Silicon Valley brings to market. We'll see how data and the coming age of AI raise the stakes on these questions of identity and technology. How can we ensure that AI technology will help reduce bias in human decision-making in areas from marketing to criminal justice, rather than amplify it?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lee, C. (PI)

CSRE 47Q: Heartfulness: Mindfulness, Compassion, and Responsibility

We practice mindfulness as a way of enhancing well-being, interacting compassionately with others, and engaging in socially responsible actions as global citizens. Contemplation is integrated with social justice through embodied practice, experiential learning, and creative expression. Class activities and assignments include journaling, mindfulness practices, and expressive arts. We build a sense of community through appreciative intelligence, connected knowing, deep listening and storytelling.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 188Q: Imagining Women: Writers in Print and in Person (FEMGEN 188Q)

Gender roles, gender relations and sexual identity explored in contemporary literature and conversation with guest authors. Weekly meetings designated for book discussion and meeting with authors. Interest in writing and a curiosity about diverse women's lives would be helpful to students. Students will use such tools as close reading, research, analysis and imagination. Seminar requires strong voice of all participants. Oral presentations, discussion papers, final projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Miner, V. (PI)

ENGLISH 18Q: Writer's Salon

This course explores from a writer's perspective what it takes to craft a successful novel, short story collection, or book of poetry. You will read three prize-winning books from Bay Area authors, including Creative Writing instructors here at Stanford. Each author will visit our class to talk about their work and the writing process. From week to week, you will complete short writing exercises culminating in a longer story or series of poems that you share with class. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ekiss, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 19Q: I Bet You Think You're Funny: Humor Writing Workshop

Nothing is harder than being funny on purpose. We often associate humor with lightness, and sometimes that's appropriate, but humor is inextricably interlinked with pain and anger, and our funniest moments often spring from our deepest wounds. Humor can also allow us a platform for rage and indignation when other forms of rhetoric feel inadequate. This workshop will take students through the techniques and aesthetics of humor writing, in a variety of forms, and the main product of the quarter will be to submit for workshop a sustained piece of humor writing. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Porter, E. (PI)
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