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91 - 100 of 139 results for: all courses

LINGUIST 47N: Languages, Dialects, Speakers

Preference to freshmen. Variation and change in languages from around the world; language and thought; variation in sound patterns and grammatical structures; linguistic and social structures of variation; how languages differ from one another and how issues in linguistics connect to other social and cultural issues; the systematic study of language.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Anttila, A. (PI)

LINGUIST 54N: Social Bias and Earwitness Memory

As individuals, we would like to believe that we are free from biases and that we are somehow immune to acting on the social biases that we have been socialized to since birth. We would like to believe that we can report experiences accurately, recalling events as they truly happened. But, memory is faulty and stereotypes and social biases are pervasive. And, at a level beneath our own control, these biases slip in and influence our memory of events. Eyewitness memory, and the inaccuracy and unreliability of eyewitnesses, is a perfect example of this. But, what about the things we hear? Speech carries a great deal of information; packets of co-varying cues we have been raised to recognize categorically, informing us about a talker¿s race, accent, emotion, and gender. We have, through our ears, information about events that occur. And, we have in our minds, stereotyped expectations about how various groups of people behave and what various groups of people might say. In this course, we more »
As individuals, we would like to believe that we are free from biases and that we are somehow immune to acting on the social biases that we have been socialized to since birth. We would like to believe that we can report experiences accurately, recalling events as they truly happened. But, memory is faulty and stereotypes and social biases are pervasive. And, at a level beneath our own control, these biases slip in and influence our memory of events. Eyewitness memory, and the inaccuracy and unreliability of eyewitnesses, is a perfect example of this. But, what about the things we hear? Speech carries a great deal of information; packets of co-varying cues we have been raised to recognize categorically, informing us about a talker¿s race, accent, emotion, and gender. We have, through our ears, information about events that occur. And, we have in our minds, stereotyped expectations about how various groups of people behave and what various groups of people might say. In this course, we will explore how these two types of information (e.g., the percept of what is actually heard vs. our stereotypes about who is likely to have said what) clash together and influence ¿earwitness memory¿. We will read and critique journal articles, blogs, and popular science articles, think about the reliability of memory for auditory events, and we will work together to develop three well-designed thought experiments that address questions at the heart of this issue. Along the way, we will learn a bit about the acoustics of speech, social variation in speech, speech perception and spoken word recognition, memory, and experimental design and analysis. Students in this course should be committed to reading the assignments, sharing their ideas about the readings (without concern for ¿being right¿), and think creatively about ways we can explore the idea of earwitness memory together. While this is a one-quarter course, my goal is to pursue our thought experiments collaboratively, with any interested students in subsequent quarters.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Sumner, M. (PI)

MATH 83N: Proofs and Modern Mathematics

How do mathematicians think? Why are the mathematical facts learned in school true? In this course students will explore higher-level mathematical thinking and will gain familiarity with a crucial aspect of mathematics: achieving certainty via mathematical proofs, a creative activity of figuring out what should be true and why. This course is ideal for students who would like to learn about the reasoning underlying mathematical results, but at a pace and level of abstraction not as intense as Math 61CM/DM, as a consequence benefiting from additional opportunity to explore the reasoning. Familiarity with one-variable calculus is strongly recommended at least at the AB level of AP Calculus since a significant part of the seminar develops develops some of the main results in that material systematically from a small list of axioms. We also address linear algebra from the viewpoint of a mathematician, illuminating notions such as fields and abstract vector spaces. This seminar may be paired with Math 51; though that course is not a pre- or co-requisite.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR

MATSCI 81N: Bioengineering Materials to Heal the Body

Preference to freshmen. Real-world examples of materials developed for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine therapies. How scientists and engineers design new materials for surgeons to use in replacing body parts such as damaged heart or spinal cord tissue. How cells interact with implanted materials. Students identify a clinically important disease or injury that requires a better material, proposed research approaches to the problem, and debate possible engineering solutions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

ME 23N: Soft Robots for Humanity

While traditional robotic manipulators are constructed from rigid links and simple joints, a new generation of robotic devices are soft, using flexible, deformable materials. Students in this class will get hands-on experience building soft robots using various materials, actuators, and programming to create robots that perform different tasks. Through this process, students will gain an appreciation for the capabilities and limitations of bio-inspired systems, use design thinking to create novel robotic solutions, and gain practical interdisciplinary engineering skills.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Okamura, A. (PI)

MED 71N: Hormones in a Performance-Enhanced Society

(Formerly 117Q) Preference to first-year students. Explores how the availability of hormone therapy has affected various aspects of daily lives. Topics include the controversies concerning menopause and its treatment; use of hormones in athletics; cosmetic use of hormones to enhance growth, strength, and libido; use of hormones as anti-aging drugs; and how the hormone system has influenced our notions of gender. Includes the biochemistry and physiology of the human endocrine system; how hormones influence behavior, and how to read a scientific paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Hoffman, A. (PI)

MED 73N: Scientific Method and Bias

Offers an introduction to the scientific method and common biases in science. Examines theoretical considerations and practical examples where biases have led to erroneous conclusions, as well as scientific practices that can help identify, correct or prevent such biases. Additionally focuses on appropriate methods to interweave inductive and deductive approaches. Topics covered include: Popper¿s falsification and Kuhn¿s paradigm shift, revolution vs. evolution; determinism and uncertainty; probability, hypothesis testing, and Bayesian approaches; agnostic testing and big data; team science; peer review; replication; correlation and causation; bias in design, analysis, reporting and sponsorship of research; bias in the public perception of science, mass media and research; and bias in human history and everyday life. Provides students an understanding of how scientific knowledge has been and will be generated; the causes of bias in experimental design and in analytical approaches; and the interactions between deductive and inductive approaches in the generation of knowledge.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

MUSIC 11N: Harmonic Convergence: Music's Intersections with Science, Mathematics, History, and Literature

Topics include music and the brain; tuning and temperament; musical form; connections between music and mathematics; and readings in history and literature with strong musical elements. Readings include "The Power of Music" (Mannes), "Musicophilia" (Sacks), "From Music to Mathematics" (Roberts), "The Kreutzer Sonata" (Tolstoy), "A Clockwork Orange" and "Honey for the Bears" (Burgess). Compositions by Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Debussy, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Shostakovich, and others will be studied. Goals: increased understanding of music's relationship to other fields; improved writing skills. While ability to read music is not required, students with musical ability will be encouraged to perform relevant works in class.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Phillips, P. (PI)

MUSIC 14N: Women Making Music (FEMGEN 13N)

Preference to freshmen. Women's musical activities across times and cultures; how ideas about gender influence the creation, performance, and perception of music.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Hadlock, H. (PI)

MUSIC 31N: Behind the Big Drums: Exploring Taiko (ASNAMST 31N)

Preference to Freshman. Since 1992 generations of Stanford students have heard, seen, and felt the power of taiko, big Japanese drums, at Admit Weekend, NSO, or at Baccalaureate. This seminar provides students with the opportunity to get behind the big drums, literally and academically. In fact, taiko is a relative newcomer to the American music scene. The contemporary ensemble drumming form, or kumidaiko, developed in Japan in the 1950s. The first North American taiko groups emerged from the Japanese American community shortly after and coincided with increased Asian American activism. In the intervening years, taiko has spread rapidly into other communities, most surprisingly to the UK, Europe, Australia, and South America. What drives the power of these drums? In this course, we explore the musical, cultural, historical, and political perspectives of taiko through readings and discussion, by playing the drums, workshopping with taiko masters, and meeting members of the taiko community. With North American taiko as the focal point, we learn about Japanese music and Japanese American history, and explore relations between performance, cultural expression, community, and identity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
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