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71 - 80 of 126 results for: all courses

FILMSTUD 107N: Documentary Film: Telling it Like it Is?

Documentary films have become a "lingua franca," thanks to ubiquitous streaming services and our devotion to screen time. Offering compelling stories, intriguing "characters," and a lingering resonance, they often function as a Rorschach test that elicits divergent responses. This course decodes the narrative technique, point of view, authorship, and aesthetic approach of nonfiction films that explore scintillating and provocative subject matter. The student develops "visual literacy" skills as we interrogate the inferred relationship between documentary, objectivity, and "truth." In this seminar-style class, we peel back the veneer of the films we watch, examining both form and content.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Krawitz, J. (PI)

FILMSTUD 211N: Childish Enthusiasms and Perishable Manias

This course has a simple premise: Effective scholarship need not suck the joy from the world. G. K. Chesterton once wrote that 'it is the duty of every poet, and even of every critic, to dance in respectful imitation of the child.' What could it mean to do scholarship that respects a child's playful and exploratory engagement with the world? Such questions will be filtered through such 'unserious' media as amusement parks, comics, cartoons, musicals, and kidlit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Bukatman, S. (PI)

GEOLSCI 38N: The Worst Journey in the World: The Science, Literature, and History of Polar Exploration (EARTHSYS 38N, ESS 38N)

This course examines the motivations and experiences of polar explorers under the harshest conditions on Earth, as well as the chronicles of their explorations and hardships, dating to the 1500s for the Arctic and the 1700s for the Antarctic. Materials include The Worst Journey in the World by Aspley Cherry-Garrard who in 1911 participated in a midwinter Antarctic sledging trip to recover emperor penguin eggs. Optional field trip into the high Sierra in March.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci

GEOPHYS 54N: The Space Mission to Europa

Jupiter's icy moon Europa is a leading candidate in the search for life in our solar system outside of Earth. NASA's upcoming Europa Clipper mission would investigate the habitability of the moon using a suite of nine geophysical instruments. In this course, we will use the mission as a central text around which to explore the intersection of science, engineering, management, economics, culture, and politics involved in any modern big science enterprise.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

GERMAN 57N: Nietzsche and the Search for Meaning

Many of us have heard his declarations of the death of God, the arrival of the Superman, and the need to live beyond good and evil. But what, beyond such sound bites, did Nietzsche actually teach? How can his writings be understood in the context of their own time? And what significance might they hold for us today?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Smith, M. (PI)

GLOBAL 150N: Climate Change and Mental Health (PSYC 150N)

The impact of climate change is far-reaching, extending beyond immediate and imminent ecological effects and into a range of human experiences, including physical and mental disease. This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to consider the interaction of climate change and mental health. Beginning with historical associations of nature and human well-being, we will use a variety of texts¿some historic, some literary, some scientific¿to explore the effects of nature on the human mind. Similarly, we will look at how human psychology influences our reactions to climate change, from grief, to climate change denialism, to action. The seminar has a significant out-of-doors component, including local ecosystem exploration, an applied study of ¿nature therapy,¿ and field trips to sites where clinical work on the interaction of nature and mental health can be observed first-hand. This year we are fortunate to have received a Global Studies Course Innovation Award to support our field-trips, as well as the visit of several guests nationally known for their work in the areas of climate change and mental health.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Mason, D. (PI)

HISTORY 41N: Visible Bodies: Black Female Authors and the Politics of Publishing in 20th-Century Southern Africa

Where are the African female writers of the twentieth century? This Introductory Seminar addresses the critical problem of the marginalization of black female authors within established canons of twentieth-century African literature. We will explore, analyse and interrogate the reasons why, and the ways in which, women-authored bodies of work from this period continues to be lost, misplaced, forgotten, and ignored by a male-dominated and largely European/white publishing industry in the context of colonialism and apartheid. nnStudents will be introduced to key twentieth-century female authors from Southern Africa, some of them published (e.g. Bessie Head, Miriam Tlali) but many more unpublished or out-of-print (Victoria Swaartbooi, Regina Twala). The class will look at the challenges these female authors faced in publishing, including how they navigated a hostile publishing industry and a lack of funding and intellectual support for black writers, especially female writers. We will als more »
Where are the African female writers of the twentieth century? This Introductory Seminar addresses the critical problem of the marginalization of black female authors within established canons of twentieth-century African literature. We will explore, analyse and interrogate the reasons why, and the ways in which, women-authored bodies of work from this period continues to be lost, misplaced, forgotten, and ignored by a male-dominated and largely European/white publishing industry in the context of colonialism and apartheid. nnStudents will be introduced to key twentieth-century female authors from Southern Africa, some of them published (e.g. Bessie Head, Miriam Tlali) but many more unpublished or out-of-print (Victoria Swaartbooi, Regina Twala). The class will look at the challenges these female authors faced in publishing, including how they navigated a hostile publishing industry and a lack of funding and intellectual support for black writers, especially female writers. We will also examine the strategies these writers used to mitigate their apparent marginality, including looking at how women self-published, how they used newspapers as publication venues and how many sought international publishing networks outside of the African continent. nnA key component of this course will be to engage with present-day literary-historical projects which showcase these hitherto marginalized bodies of work. Stanford¿s CESTA is home to a new digital humanities project entitled ¿Visible Bodies¿, led by myself. My goal is to create a critical digital archive displaying the key bodies of work of unpublished and out-of-print twentieth-century African female writers. One assessment for this Intro Seminar will invite students to submit proposals for any aspect of this digital archive-in-progress, including web design, curation methodology, ethical considerations, social media strategy. The point of the assessment is to link the theoretical and the practical: once we have understood the key issues at play in the marginalization of black twentieth-century African female authors, how can we develop concrete strategies to ameliorate this?nnStudents will use Zoom, Slack and Canvas. Students will also be introduced to Notion, a collaborative data and knowledge-management application used by the Visible Bodies digital literary archive. You can expect a roughly 50/50 division between synchronous and asynchronous learning.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

HISTORY 42N: The Missing Link

This course explores the history of evolutionary science, focusing upon debates surrounding the evolutionary place of human beings in the natural world, by examining the history of the idea of a "missing link," an intermediate form between humans and apes. We will consider famous hoaxes such as the Piltdown Man, and films and stories such as King Kong and Planet of the Apes, as well as serious scientific work such as that of Eugène Dubois, the paleoanthropologist and geologist who discovered Homo erectus (first called Java Man and then Pithecanthropus erectus) and first developed the notion of a missing link. We will take an interest not only in scientific aspects of missing-link theories but in their accompanying political, social and cultural implications. And we'll watch some classic monster films.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 63N: The Feminist Critique: The History and Politics of Gender Equality (AMSTUD 63N, CSRE 63N, FEMGEN 63N)

This course explores the long history of ideas about gender and equality. Each week we read, dissect, compare, and critique a set of primary historical documents (political and literary) from around the world, moving from the 15th century to the present. We tease out changing arguments about education, the body, sexuality, violence, labor, politics, and the very meaning of gender, and we place feminist critics within national and global political contexts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

HISTORY 116N: Howard Zinn and the Quest for Historical Truth (EDUC 116N)

With more than two million copies in print, Howard Zinn's A People's History is a cultural icon. We will use Zinn's book to probe how we determine what was true in the past. A People's History will be our point of departure, but our journey will visit a variety of historical trouble spots: debates about whether the US was founded as a Christian nation, Holocaust denial, and the "Birther" controversy of President Obama.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Wineburg, S. (PI)
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